Perú declares state of emergency to fight drug trafficking

first_imgBy Dialogo September 15, 2014 The President of Perú declared a 60-day state of emergency Sept. 11 in the Amazonian districts of Mariscal Ramón Castilla and Yavari, in the Loreto Region, to allow security forces to increase their efforts to fight drug trafficking. Security forces are focusing on fighting drug trafficking in regions bordering Colombia and Brazil. The state of emergency allows security forces to conduct searches without warrants and prohibits public gatherings. The National Police and the military are cooperating to “effectively combat illegal drug trafficking” in the districts that are home to about 28,000, the Executive branch of the government said in a prepared statement said. The state of the emergency is declared in the Executive Order 057-2014-PCM. Peruvian security forces recently destroyed numerous drug laboratories in Mariscal Ramón Castilla and Yavari, where authorities plan to eradicate 3,500 hectares of coca, the main ingredient used to produce cocaine. Perú is the world’s leading cocaine-producing country, according to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC). In 2012, criminal organizations cultivated more than 60,000 hectares of coca crops in Perú, according to the UNODC’s annual report, “Perú: Cocaine Cultivation Monitoring 2012.” Perú is home to 13-coca growing regions, with 60,400 hectares which are used for coca cultivation, according to the report. Peruvian, Colombian and Brazilian police have noticed in spike in narco-trafficking – specifically in shipments of drugs and precursor chemicals – along the countries’ borders. Drug trafficking groups process about 200 tons of cocaine in Perú’s Apurimac, Ene and Mantaro River Valleys (VRAEM) annually, Peruvian security analyst Rubén Vargas told La República. Drug traffickers transport about 90 percent of that cocaine through the air, he said. The cocaine is then transported throughout the world, with shipments headed to Central America, North America, Brazil, Mexico, Europe and Asia. In recent months, Peruvian security forces dismantled 37 clandestine drug trafficking air strips in early September. Security forces blasted massive holes in the runways to prevent them from being used. Local residents build the secret airstrips and charge drug traffickers a fee, to use them, according to Peruvian police. Peruvian authorities must remain vigilant in their efforts to dismantle drug trafficking air strips, Deputy Defense Minister Iván Vega said: “We might destroy the runways, but locals financed by drug traffickers will come to put them together again so the flights continue.” From January 1 through August 31 2014, Peruvian authorities destroyed 12,721 hectares of coca plants, according to Peru’s National Commission for a Drug-Free Life (DEVIDA). Their goal is to eradicate 30,000 hectares of the crop in 2014. Ninety-three percent of coca crops in Peru are used to produce the drug, according to DEVIDA. In 2013, Peruvian security forces authorities eradicated more than 23,947 hectares which were used for coca cultivation, a significant increase from the 14,234 hectares security forces destroyed in 2012.last_img read more

Venue for Tipp league quarter final to be decided today

first_imgThe Premier County booked their place in the final 8 with a 2-27 to 2-15 win over Cork in Semple Stadium yesterday. The venue for the clash with the Banner will be decided by the toss of a coin and confirmed by the GAA’s CCCC this afternoon.Speaking to Tipp FM following his side’s win over the Rebels, Tipp Manager Michael Ryan says they are already looking forward to the match against their neighbours.last_img

Foster’s Fairplay: Athlete Representative concerns

first_img The general secretary, laughable as his reaction was, definitely does not suggest that there is. This, in the best interest of Jamaica’s youth who choose sports as their pathway to a better life, cannot be allowed to continue. How can an athlete, who has already been to the highest level, bringing honour to country and self with a scintillating performance, be guided in the way he is now being steered? As a winner at the recent Beijing trials, should he not be asked to occupy a legitimate stage on the professional circuit, honing skills and getting sharp for the stern tests in the Bird’s Nest? Instead, what is being heard is “no races planned”. All that is scheduled is training, training, training. The suggestion of saving him from long flights (to Europe) falls on its face, with the Pan Am Games and all that it offers a four-hour aircraft flight away. Come on people, track and field supporters are among the brightest. Certainly, they are not fools. The plot thickens, when it is considered that the AR, blessed with stewardship over this athlete, was herself a most talented participant in the same event. Do not take Foster’s Fairplay’s word. Check the year 1993. Then, she won the USA collegiate title and, days later, the national crown as well. It made her the world leader of those entered for the event at the World Championships in Stuttgart that year. Her coach at the time, prescribed “no races in the interim”. This columnist, new to the sport then, was her agent. She entered Stuttgart, unexposed to any of the Americans and Russians who were to be her opponents there. Her performance at the big show was dismal. Jamaica’s head coach expressed his opinion to this columnist, there in a radio station coverage, in words unprintable. Efforts to contact her were not successful. Is this where arguably Jamaica’s greatest young talent is being led? – For feedback, email: [email protected] Foster’s Fairplay recently ignored a self-generated story. The reason: it was seen as more important to ease pressures on an alleged guilty party. As a follower of truth, this columnist was later to regret the decision. The said matter was broadcast elsewhere with much of what was involved, denied public knowledge. This was simply because the commentator was restricted in his knowledge of the matter. Having said all that, there is deep concern with how some of the country’s most talented athletes are being handled. Should it not be within the scope of the Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association (JAAA) to have some controlling oversight, concerning who comes out and says, “I am his or her agent”? Is such a declaration, despite having registered as an athlete representative (AR), enough to satisfy that the charges are being properly managed? UNSOLICITED ADVICE THIS CAN’T CONTINUE Some time ago, this columnist gave some free and unsolicited advice to the parents of an extremely gifted local high-school athlete. They were urged to seek someone with the requisite experience and expertise to see to the affairs of their son. There was no compulsion to follow that counsel, but things do not seem to be working out as planned. This has led to a halt to his season, in which so many opportunities for top-class exposure were on offer. Pity the unfortunate and uninformed parents wanting the best, but now other thoughts must arise. In a recent interview with the general secretary of the JAAA, Garth Gayle, a question, in the present context, was posed. The high-school principal was requested to “speak to any attempts to guide athletes on agent choices or is that not a concern of your association?” The query to Mr Gayle was against the background that “younger and unexposed ones (athletes) are entering that arena”. The need for “a fulsome response” was mentioned. This journalist will spare both readers and the administrator himself the nature of the reply. Suffice to say, it was embarrassing, not the least of which, to this columnist. Foster’s Fairplay is making the case for a closer look at who is given the privilege of being AR to Jamaica’s best talents. This assumes that there currently is any level of scrutiny by the governing body, which seems doubtful.last_img read more