Neal “Fro” Evans To Replace Scotty Zwang As Drummer Of Dopapod

first_imgDopapod has just announced that original drummer Neal “Fro” Evans will be rejoining the band on a full-time basis, replacing current drummer Scotty Zwang. Zwang joined the band after Evans had to leave the band for personal reasons, and helped the group record 2014’s Never Odd Or Even, while touring with the group non-stop across the country the last few years.Evans will rejoin the group for their upcoming performances at the Resonance Music & Arts Festival, as well as the Catskill Chill Music Festival. We look forward to seeing Evans rejoin Dopapod and seeing where the group goes from here, and wish Zwang the best of luck in his future musical endeavors. Here is what the group had to say, via their Facebook page:Friends, Family, and Fans,As we step out of another incredible summer and look towards what is sure to be an exhilarating Fall Tour, there is news that we’d like to share. Neal “Fro” Evans is returning to Dopapod behind the drums. For those unaware or needing a refresher, Fro was our drummer for the years that the band was really shaping its sound and stepping into full stride. We came to a bit of a crossroads with Neal back in 2013 and he needed time away from the band for personal reasons while we wanted to continue playing and growing as a band. Having already been good friends with Scotty Zwang, when the time came to look for a replacement, he made for an incredible fit. Since that point in time, the band has experienced an incredible ride of musical, personal, and career-building growth. As we count our blessings for every moment that we’ve experienced while surrounded by a wonderfully supportive family of fans, we’ve also found ourselves recounting the original chemistry that undeniably forged the path that we’re grateful to be walking. That has landed us in the present moment of welcoming Neal back to the fold and him being more than happy rejoin. Scotty will surely be staying on the map with other exciting projects and will always be a part of our family. We wish him the best and encourage everyone to support his new endeavors. In our time playing together, Scotty has truly become one of our best friends and we cherish the time he spent in the band with us. Neal’s first shows back will be Resonance Music & Arts Festival & Catskill Chill Music Festival. See you all soon!Explore The New Catskill Chill Home With Aerial Drone Footage & Co-Founder Josh CohenThe group shared this video from Neal’s “GoFro” back in 2013:last_img read more

Long Island Blizzard May Dump Up to 36 Inches of Snow

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A blizzard is forecast to dump more than three feet of snow on Long Island with wind gusts up to 65 mph starting Monday, with the blowing snow potentially causing whiteout conditions.The National Weather Service issued a blizzard warning from 1 p.m. Monday to 12 a.m. Wednesday for Nassau and Suffolk counties, where 24 to 36 inches is possible, forecasters said. There is also a coastal flood watch in effect from 12 a.m. to 5 a.m. Tuesday.“Heaviest snow and strongest winds will occer overnight Monday into Tuesday,” meteorologists from the agency’s Upton office said in a statement, which added that the storm could be crippling, historic and life threatening. “Secondary and tertiary roads may become impassable. Strong winds may down power lines and tree limbs.”The same storm is expected to impact the Mid-West before blanketing parts of New England. It may be the biggest storm to hit the region since a blizzard dumped a record-breaking nearly three feet of snow on parts of LI two years ago.The blizzard warning means the heavy snowfall is likely to combine with sustained winds of 25 to 35 mph may reduce visibility to a quarter of a mile or less at times. The storm is likely to cancel flights, make driving dangerous and could impact Long Island Rail Road service.When the storm is expected to hit Monday afternoon, temperatures are forecast to be in the 20s with wind chill values in the teens. Those temps are predicted to hold through Tuesday, when it may drop down into the teens after sundown.Once the storm passes, Wednesday is forecast  to be sunny before a 30-percent chance of snow returns Thursday night. The weekend forecast includes sunny skies in the 30s for Friday and Saturday.last_img read more

Unique awards for Late Model, Deery drivers highlight Integra’s 10th season as IMCA sponsor

first_imgBoth the first and second place drivers in combined Late Model national and tour point standings receive $350 product certificates from the Coopersville, Mich., manufacturer. COOPERSVILLE, Mich. – Integra Racing Shocks continues a unique program of awards for Late Model and Deery Brothers Sumer Series drivers in 2019, its 10th season as an IMCA sponsor. IMCA Modified, IMCA Sunoco Stock Car, IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stock, Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMod and Smiley’s Racing Products Southern SportMod drivers also earn Integra awards based on regional or national point standings.  Information about the complete line of Integra shocks, springs and accessories is available at the www.integrashocksandsprings.com website, by calling 800 472-2464 and on Facebook. “Integra Racing Shocks has a long history of involvement with IMCA,” said Marketing Coordinator Anna Daugherty. “We are happy to continue that tradition in 2019 with awards for the competitors who support our products.”  Integra awards will be presented during the national banquet in November or mailed beginning the following week from the IMCA home office.center_img “It is always great to see the wide variety of drivers that Integra recognizes and this year it may be even more diverse with the expanded Late Model geography,” IMCA Marketing Director Kevin Yoder noted. “We are excited to get the season underway.” Certificates good for $350, $250 and $150 go to top three eligible drivers in each of the five re­gions for Modifieds, both Stock Car regions and both Hobby Stock regions, and to top three driv­ers in national Northern SportMod and Southern SportMod standings.  Drivers in all six divisions must compete with four Integra shocks and springs, display two Integra decals on their race car and return a sign-up form to the IMCA home office by Aug. 1 to be eligi­ble. Third and fourth place drivers in combined points each get $250 product certificates and fifth and sixth place drivers both earn $150 product certificates.last_img read more

Siphon Creek Fire Will Likely Burn Until Autumn

first_imgDOIG RIVER, B.C. – Though previous photographs of the massive plumes of smoke emanating from the Siphon Creek Fire are dramatic, it is from directly above that the charred 853 square kilometres that the true scale of the fire is made apparent.While driving to a media tour put on by the BC Wildfire Service, the only indication of trouble is a streak of haze visible in the distance from the Rose Prairie Road about 30 kilometres north of Fort St. John. The main camp to house the crew doing battle against the conflagration sits two kilometres down a nondescript dirt road surrounded by tall trees on either side. Entering a clearing, the camp sprawls across several acres of a pasture, with a radio mast, numerous trailers, and dozens of tents to house the firefighters and support staff.- Advertisement – The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The man in charge of not only the camp, but the entire firefighting operation is Incident Commander Rob Krause, a well-seasoned firefighter who is in his 35th season with the Forest Service. Krause greets the media with a wide smile below his impressive moustache.Siphon Creek Fire Incident Commander Rob Krause. Photo credit: Chris NewtonSiphon Creek Fire Incident Commander Rob Krause. Photo credit: Chris NewtonAfter giving a quick briefing of the situation, we don red Nomex coveralls and hop into his SUV for a quick drive to another field where the helicopters battling the flames are being staged. The haze of the wildfire’s smoke quickly surrounds us, the smell permeating the SUV’s cabin. Perched atop a hill in a field, one of nearly a dozen helicopters will soon take us 2,000 ft. into the air over the fire. White Rock Staging near the Siphon Creek Fire. Photo credit: Chris Newton White Rock Staging near the Siphon Creek Fire. Photo credit: Chris Newton White Rock Staging near the Siphon Creek Fire. Photo credit: Chris Newton White Rock Staging near the Siphon Creek Fire. Photo credit: Chris Newton White Rock Staging near the Siphon Creek Fire. Photo credit: Chris Newton White Rock Staging near the Siphon Creek Fire. Photo credit: Chris Newton Incident Commander Rob Krause confers with pilot Ben Giesbrecht in front of Giesbrecht's Eurocopter AS350 B2 prior to takeoff. Photo credit: Chris Newton Incident Commander Rob Krause confers with pilot Ben Giesbrecht in front of Giesbrecht’s Eurocopter AS350 B2 prior to takeoff. Photo credit: Chris Newton Ben Giesbrecht is a veteran helicopter pilot, and is both professional and personable as he gives us a pre-flight safety briefing of his Eurocopter AS350 B2. We board, the engines roar to life, and Geisbrecht powers the chopper into the air, banking steeply to starboard in a spiralling skyward corkscrew before heading north-east.Advertisement White Rock Staging as seen from the air. Photo credit: Chris NewtonWhite Rock Staging as seen from the air. Photo credit: Chris NewtonNot five minutes in the air, the source of the haze quickly becomes apparent: Thick plumes of smoke emanate from a controlled burnout operation on the fire’s western flank. Radio chatter between Giesbrecht and the other chopper pilots around us fills the feed coming through our headphones as we trail another helicopter bucketing the flare-up through the smoke. The atmosphere onboard is one of nervous excitement. These pilots are assisting no less than 40 firefighters less than 1,000 feet below us in a war against the flames. Wagner’s “Ride of the Valkyries” could be considered suiting background music for the spectacle of three other helicopters dodging in and out of the smoke, taking turns dropping large buckets of water onto the flare-up. One of several helicopters conducting bucketing operations on the Siphon Creek Fire on May 18th. Photo credit: Chris Newton One of several helicopters conducting bucketing operations on the Siphon Creek Fire on May 18th. Photo credit: Chris Newton One of several helicopters conducting bucketing operations on the Siphon Creek Fire on May 18th. Photo credit: Chris Newton One of several helicopters conducting bucketing operations on the Siphon Creek Fire on May 18th. Photo credit: Chris Newton One of several helicopters conducting bucketing operations on the Siphon Creek Fire on May 18th. Photo credit: Chris Newton One of several helicopters conducting bucketing operations on the Siphon Creek Fire on May 18th. Photo credit: Chris Newton One of several helicopters conducting bucketing operations on the Siphon Creek Fire on May 18th. Photo credit: Chris Newton One of several helicopters conducting bucketing operations on the Siphon Creek Fire on May 18th. Photo credit: Chris Newton We climb, heading towards the fire’s head further north-east. Krause explains that the fire activity is sitting primarily at Rank 2, with some areas burning at Rank 3 (for comparison, the Fort McMurray fire was mainly burning at Rank 5 as it encroached the city 3 weeks ago). This stands in stark contrast to just two days previous when the fire grew by nearly 20,000 hectares. The landscape is a patchwork of untouched stands of spruce forest in a sea of blackened sticks. According to Krause, this is a sign of the fire moving at incredible speed. Lines of brown trees are hypothesized by crews as signs of the fire burning fierce enough to consume all available oxygen which results in incomplete combustion, leaving the trees unburned but singed by the intense heat. The patchy appearance of burned and unburned forest within the Siphon Creek Fire perimeter. Photo credit: Chris Newton The patchy appearance of burned and unburned forest within the Siphon Creek Fire perimeter. Photo credit: Chris Newton The patchy appearance of burned and unburned forest within the Siphon Creek Fire perimeter. Photo credit: Chris Newton The patchy appearance of burned and unburned forest within the Siphon Creek Fire perimeter. Photo credit: Chris Newton The patchy appearance of burned and unburned forest within the Siphon Creek Fire perimeter. Photo credit: Chris Newton The patchy appearance of burned and unburned forest within the Siphon Creek Fire perimeter. Photo credit: Chris Newton The patchy appearance of burned and unburned forest within the Siphon Creek Fire perimeter. Photo credit: Chris Newton The patchy appearance of burned and unburned forest within the Siphon Creek Fire perimeter. Photo credit: Chris Newton The patchy appearance of burned and unburned forest within the Siphon Creek Fire perimeter. Photo credit: Chris Newton The patchy appearance of burned and unburned forest within the Siphon Creek Fire perimeter. Photo credit: Chris Newton Flying around the fire’s perimeter on the return journey, Krause tells us that the lack of intense fire activity below us is due to a shift in the wind from the north, which is pushing the fire back into areas already burned. Due to less rainfall in the past several years Krause says that the water table in the Peace Region is so low that though no large flames are visible, the fire is burning and will continue to burn underground at least until the fire snows fall in autumn. In extreme cases, the blanket of snow can cause a fire to become insulated from the intense cold of winter and reappear the next spring.Advertisement Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton We briefly follow another helicopter before peeling off to our southerly track. Geisbrecht and Krause both explain that the other chopper is surveying the fire’s jagged perimeter to establish places that fire guards could be built that will contain the fire while avoiding the numerous pipelines that traverse the terrain, denoted by strips of cleared trees. Crews are unable to use these as fire guards due to the possibility of rupturing them.We circle around for one more pass of the bucketing operations, albeit this time at a much higher altitude, before heading back toward “White Rock Staging”, one of many locations around the conflagration that serve as helipads. Our pilot’s skills are demonstrated during a sharp banking right turn as he swerves the craft to avoid a bird flying in our path. After a feather-soft landing, we return to base and finish the tour with Fire Information Officer Erin Catherall.Fire Information Officer Erin Catherall. Photo credit: Chris NewtonFire Information Officer Erin Catherall. Photo credit: Chris NewtonCatherall explains that the base, which can be set up in a little as 48 hours, can accommodate up to 300 personnel. The base will continue to operate for at least the next month as crews attempt to fully contain the fire within the perimeter. Krause says that monitoring the fire once it is fully contained will the focus of crews, not fully extinguishing it. A map of the Siphon Creek Fire from May 18th set up in the command post Briefing Tent. Photo credit: Chris Newton A map of the Siphon Creek Fire from May 18th set up in the command post Briefing Tent. Photo credit: Chris Newton The northern flank of the Siphon Creek Fire on May 18th, known as the head of the fire. Photo credit: Chris Newton The northern flank of the Siphon Creek Fire on May 18th, known as the head of the fire. Photo credit: Chris Newton The western flank of the Siphon Creek Fire where helicopter crews were conducting bucketing operations on May 18th. Photo credt: Chris Newton The western flank of the Siphon Creek Fire where helicopter crews were conducting bucketing operations on May 18th. Photo credt: Chris Newton As of Friday May 20th,  168 firefighters, 4 helicopters, and 11 pieces of heavy equipment are currently battling the fire on the BC side of the Alberta border. Today a new Ontario incident management team is taking over command on the Alberta side of the border, and is collaborating firefighting efforts with their colleagues from BC.Advertisementlast_img read more