Corby Hall holds open house

first_imgFor young men at Notre Dame considering a religious vocation, the doors at Corby Hall are always open. On Wednesday night at 8 p.m., Corby Night, hosted by Holy Cross priests, brothers and seminarians, took place at Corby Hall for those young men discerning the priesthood. It began with a candlelight service in the chapel of the hall and was followed by a social hour, in which the undergraduates could get to know one another and speak with the religious leaders. Fr. Jim Gallagher, director of the Office of Vocations, said he could relate to young men deciding whether or not a life in the priesthood was right for them. “For the longest time it was on my mind but I never talked to anybody about it,” Gallagher said. “The most important thing is to talk to somebody.” Students at the event ranged from Notre Dame undergraduates and those living at Old College, the University’s undergraduate seminary for the Congregation of the Holy Cross, to seminarians who had already completed their undergraduate degree.  Vincent Nguyen, a Notre Dame senior who currently lives in Moreau Seminary, said he recognized his vocation as early as freshman year. “It was the community life and prayer life that brought it all together,” Nguyen said. As a seminarian, Nguyen said he is still an active member of the Notre Dame community and is able to balance the religious aspects of his life with academics and social activities.  “I’ve had practice with the balancing since I lived in Old College for the first three years,” Nguyen said. “I’m still involved on campus.” In the past 10 to 15 years, vocations to the priesthood in America have increased, Gallgher said. At a Catholic university such as Notre Dame, those thinking about committing to life as a priest have many resources to help them in their discernment, he said. “The sort of guys who might be thinking about a vocation will go to Notre Dame,” he said. “At Notre Dame there are a lot of opportunities to deepen one’s faith life.” However, a calling to the priesthood is not met without certain difficulties, he said. “One of the biggest challenges is commitment,” Gallagher said. “For young people today it’s hard because there are so many things for them to commit to.” Gallagher said talking to one of the many priests and brothers on campus is a good way for young men to introduce themselves and discuss their vocation. “My job is not to convince them to join the seminary,” Gallagher said. “My job is to help them decide whether or not the seminary is right for them.”last_img read more

Vermont improves in traffic safety laws review

first_imgHighway safety advocates today released the 2011 Roadmap Report, the eighth annual report card grading all 50 states and the District of Columbia on their performance when it comes to adopting 15 basic traffic safety laws. This year the report’s publishers, Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety (Advocates), focused on the state budgetary impact of highway safety gaps. Vermont moved up to a grade of “yellow,” mostly for its addition of a text-messaging prohibition.”As states debate about keeping their treasuries solvent, lawmakers and governors in many states are blind to obvious legislative actions that will help with the budget crisis,” said Judith Lee Stone, president of Advocates. “The 2011 Roadmap To State Highway Safety Laws shows that adoption of effective state traffic safety laws saves lives and saves taxpayer dollars.”Among the 15 model laws Advocates evaluated in its 2011 Roadmap To State Highway Safety Laws are seat belt, booster seat and motorcycle helmet measures, in addition to restrictions and requirements for teen drivers, all-driver texting bans and tougher impaired driving laws.The federal government estimates that motor vehicle crashes cost society $230 billion every year. In 2009, nearly 34,000 people died in crashes throughout the nation and millions more were injured. This is equivalent to a “crash tax” of more than $800 for every person.”There are both obvious and hidden costs in the millions of deaths and injuries that occur on the nation’s roads every year. Motor vehicle costs are diverting and depleting our nation’s resources at an alarming rate,” said Ted Miller, Principal Research Scientist, Pacific Institute of Research and Evaluation. “The Medicaid bill for crashes alone is $8 billion per year. In addition, catastrophic injury patients pour onto the Medicaid rolls to pay their hospital bills. And once they convert to Medicaid, not only do we pay that hospital bill, we pay for all their health care.””Legislators can do more to save lives and prevent serious injuries by passing traffic safety laws than I can ever hope to save in a lifetime of treating patients in the emergency room. For example, Virginia should pass a primary enforcement seat belt law this year to save money from unnecessary Medicaid and other medical expenditures which are accelerating annually. It’s a matter of dollars and sense,” said Dr. Mark R. Sochor, an emergency physician and Associate Professor and Research Director, University of Virginia Department of Emergency Medicine.In this year’s report states were given one of three ratings based on how many of the 15 optimal laws they have: Green (Good); Yellow (Caution – state needs improvement); and Red (Danger – state falls dangerously behind). Placement in one of the three ratings was based solely on whether or not a state had adopted a law as defined in the report, and not on any evaluation of a state’s highway safety education or enforcement programs.In 2010, five states improved their rating from Yellow to Green, Delaware, Georgia, Kansas, Louisiana and Michigan. Two states upgraded from Red to Yellow, Vermont and Wyoming. In all, the District of Columbia and 15 states were rated in the highest rated category of green including New Jersey, Illinois, Oregon, Maryland, New York, Georgia, Delaware, Michigan, North Carolina, Tennessee, Washington, Kansas, Minnesota, California and Louisiana. The states with the worst rating of red are South Dakota, Arizona, North Dakota, Virginia, Nebraska, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. Explanations for assigning the best and worst ratings can be found at www.saferoads.org(link is external).”Having just participated in the most challenging budget session I’ve experienced in Illinois where we made extremely difficult decisions to get our finances back on track, I can tell you that it is a painful process. There aren’t many stones left unturned in the quest to save our state money,” said Illinois State Senate President John Cullerton (D-6th District, Chicago). “If we hadn’t already passed the great majority of laws rated in Advocates’ Roadmap Report, I would have recommended that we do so right away. States pay a steep price for not having these safety laws and it can add up to many millions of dollars in Medicaid and other health care costs.”In 2010, 13 states enacted one or more of Advocates’ recommended highway safety laws for a total of 22 new laws. No state enacted an all-rider motorcycle helmet law although there were 9 unsuccessful attempts to repeal existing laws. The new laws enacted in all state legislatures are:Primary Enforcement of Seat Belts: Georgia (eliminated pick-up truck exemption) and KansasBooster Seats (children ages 4 through 7): Colorado (upgraded to primary enforcement)Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL) for teen drivers: Alabama (passenger and cell phone restrictions), Georgia (cell phone restriction), Kentucky (cell phone restriction), Massachusetts (cell phone restriction), Michigan (nighttime and passenger restriction), Oklahoma (cell phone restriction), Vermont (cell phone restriction), and Washington (cell phone restriction)Impaired Driving: Wisconsin (mandatory BAC testing for drivers who survived)All-Driver Text Messaging Restriction: Delaware, Georgia, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Vermont, Washington, Wisconsin and WyomingThe 2010 report found that an additional 362 new laws need to be adopted in all states and D.C. to fully meet Advocates’ 15 legislative recommendations:19 states still need an optimal primary enforcement seat belt law;30 states still need an optimal all-rider motorcycle helmet law;23 states still need an optimal booster seat law;No state meets all the criteria of Advocates’ recommended GDL program;45 states and DC are missing one or more critical impaired driving laws; and,24 states still need an all-driver text messaging restriction.Addressing today’s National Press Club news conference was Marlene Case, who became a highway safety activist after her 17-year old son Andrew, was killed in a crash involving a teen driver in 2009. “We know that at ages 16 and 17, teens just don’t understand the consequences of reckless behavior,” said Case. “We want parents to hear our story and to join with us to urge lawmakers in Pennsylvania and other states to pass strong laws that limit the number of teen passengers with new drivers, strengthen seatbelt rules, and outlaw use of cell phones. We strongly support federal adoption of the Safe Teen and Novice Driver Uniform Protection Act (STANDUP) so every teen in every state is protected. It’s too late for Andrew, but it’s not too late for others. These laws don’t cost states any money and only require political leadership.”Bill Martin, Senior Vice President of Farmers Insurance and Insurance Co-Chair of Advocates’ Board of Directors said, “For insurers, the idea that preventing injury and saving lives actually also saves money is not new. But nothing the insurer does can fully bring their customer back from the emotional tragedy suffered by families and friends when car crashes take lives and inflict debilitating injuries.”Also participating in the news announcement was Dr. Grant Baldwin, Director of Unintentional Injury Prevention at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) who described a new system that will be available in February to map death rates and estimate costs associated with injury-related deaths at state and county levels.Electronic Press Kit and WebcastAn electronic press kit including the complete 2011 Roadmap to State Highway Safety Laws, speaker statements and a replay of today’s news conference webcast can be found at www.saferoads.org(link is external).Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety is a coalition of insurance, consumer, health, safety and law enforcement organizations that work together to advance state and federal highway and vehicle safety laws, programs and policies.SOURCE Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety WASHINGTON, Jan. 24, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ —last_img read more

Arsenal signing Pablo Mari raves about ‘incredible’ team-mate Gabriel Martinelli

first_img Tom OlverWednesday 5 Feb 2020 12:22 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link8.2kShares Arsenal signing Pablo Mari raves about ‘incredible’ team-mate Gabriel Martinelli Advertisement Comment Advertisementcenter_img Martinelli’s form has caught the attention of football icon Ronaldinho (Picture: Getty)Brazil great Ronaldinho has tipped Martinelli for big things in the future and compared the forward to his legendary former team-mate Ronaldo.‘We as Brazilians are very excited about him and his future. It is one thing to have the talent – but another at the age of 18 to have the confidence,’ he told The Mirror last month.‘He reminds me of Ronaldo his first season in Europe he scored 30 goals and people were thinking: “who is this 18 year old Brazilian kid?”‘He wanted the ball, he would run at players, there was no fear no matter what players or team he was playing against – and I see that similar attitude in Martinelli.‘He just wants to be on the ball and score goals. Ronaldo went on to be the best player in the world – and that can also be the aim of Martinelli.’MORE: Barcelona confirm transfer interest in Arsenal captain Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang Gabriel Martinelli is enjoying a phenomenal breakthrough season at Arsenal (Picture: Getty)Pablo Mari has backed Arsenal wonderkid Gabriel Martinelli to go on and ‘become a top player’ if he keeps working hard and makes the most of his ‘incredible talent’.Martinelli, 18, has burst onto the scene this season, scoring ten goals in 21 appearances, and his solo wonder strike away to arch-rivals Chelsea last month will long live in the memory of Arsenal fans.The youngster’s outstanding form has even caught the eye of the Brazil national team who are considering offering him a place in their squad for the 2020 Olympics.Mari knows Brazilian football well after a short spell with Flamengo and the defender had been admiring Martinelli’s performances from afar before his January move to the Emirates.ADVERTISEMENT Burnley 0-0 Arsenal: Mikel Arteta press conferenceTo view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video Play VideoLoaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 4:10FullscreenBurnley 0-0 Arsenal: Mikel Arteta press conferencehttps://metro.co.uk/video/burnley-0-0-arsenal-mikel-arteta-press-conference-2102370/This is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.The Spaniard believes Martinelli is a unique talent but has urged the teenager to keep his feet on the ground and not look too far into the future.AdvertisementAdvertisement‘Martinelli has shown he is a bit different to any other player in terms of his ability,’ Mari told Arsenal’s official website.‘He has great vision and there’s real talent there in terms of his dribbling and his ability to choose the right play.‘His decision-making is improving all the time.‘Martinelli still has a lot more to show but he has incredible talent and I think gradually he’ll keep developing and become a top player.’ Mari has tipped Martinelli for a big future (Picture: Getty)Mari added: ‘He has exploded on to the scene and is showing that he’s a great player with a lot of talent.‘Obviously he’s still very young, but he’s already had a taste of playing at the top level and he’s doing very well.‘I’ll say congratulations when I meet him, but now he just needs to keep it up and work hard because he’s really talented.’last_img read more

7 Diet Mistakes That Can Trigger Severe Headaches and Migraines

first_imgAlthough the exact cause of migraines is still unknown, experts agree that severe headaches can be provoked by the medicine you take, abrupt changes in your endocrine system, and lack of sleep among other reasons. Your eating habits also affect the way you feel. According to studies, about 10% of people suffer from migraines that are triggered by mistakes in their diet.We have made a list of the most common food products that can provoke migraine attacks.7. Aged cheeseCheese that goes through the aging process may be a migraine trigger for many people as it is high in tyramine. Tyramine comes from the amino acid, tyrosine and is usually formed in foods that are spoiled, pickled, aged, smoked, fermented, or marinated.Aged cheeses include: cheddar, feta, blue, brie, parmesan, gouda, gruyere, Swiss, and muenster.Fresh cheeses don’t include much tyramine and can be safe to eat even if you sometimes have migraine attacks. Fresh cheeses include: farmer, cottage, American, cream, and ricotta cheeses.Mozzarella may or may not be aged, so double-check the label before buying it.6. Citrus fruitsColorful illustration of citrus fruits and glasses full of juice in flat designSour fruits contain a lot of acid that can affect your blood’s pH level and increase your chances of having a migraine headache. Some studies show that about 11% of people with headaches have reported citrus fruits to be their migraine trigger.Besides that, these fruits contain tyramine and histamine that can also affect your health if you are intolerable to them.5. Cold foodsIf you are used to eating ice cream or gulping cold drinks quickly when you are over-heated from physical exercises or hot temperatures, you may get a cold-stimulus headache which usually lasts anywhere from 25-60 seconds to 1-2 minutes.4. GlutenGluten is a protein found in such grains such as wheat, rye, barley and triticale. These grains, as well as products made from them, may trigger migraines in gluten-intolerant people.3. Food additivesAdditional chemicals in foods usually have no nutritional value and can have negative effects on your health. So if you often have headaches, try to stay away from the following additives:Monosodium glutamate (MSG — E621) is a common meat tenderizer and flavor enhancer. This preservative is one of the main ingredients of Asian foods, soy sauce, processed foods, and canned vegetables. It can spark a migraine within 20 minutes of consuming it.Nitrates and nitrites are usually found in processed meats such as hot dogs, sausages, ham, pepperoni, bacon, as well as some heart medicines. When these additives get into your body, your blood vessels start swelling and it may cause a severe headache.Aspartame (APM) and sucralose (E955) are artificial sweeteners that can be found in diet soft drinks, sports drinks, sugar-free products, and even in children’s vitamins. If you are sensitive to these additives, you can get a migraine attack after taking them.Red and yellow food coloring is usually found in candy, ice cream, potato chips, sodas, crackers, jams, cereal bars and many other products. They are made of petroleum, the same ingredient used to make motor oil, which is certainly not good for your health.2. CaffeineExcessive consumption of caffeine may contribute to the onset of a headache. That’s why you should limit your caffeine intake to 200-300 milligrams (2-3 cups of coffee) a day. Note that caffeine can also be found in products like chocolate, cocoa, tea, Coca-Cola, and even some painkillers.1. Alcoholic drinksMost people know that red wine can cause migraines, but studies show that other alcoholic beverages like beer, sparkling wine, and some strong spirits can also make your head pound.There are two types of headaches provoked by alcoholic drinks. The first one is the typical headache that usually starts within a few hours (from 30 minutes to 3 hours). The other type is a delayed alcohol-induced headache (DAIH), or a hangover.How to hold off migrainesYour eating habits also play a great role in the status of your health. If you want to keep migraine attacks under control, try to follow these simple rules:Stay hydrated. Dehydration headaches may occur after extreme sweating or because of diarrhea and/or vomiting. They can appear along with symptoms such as dizziness, fatigue, and a fast heart rate. Don’t forget to drink at least 8 glasses of water a day to make sure your body is working properly.Don’t skip meals. Instead, you can eat mini meals 5-6 times a day. It will prevent you from getting a headache because you’re hungry.Take vitamins and minerals. Low intake of folic acid, magnesium, iron, copper, vitamins D, B2, B6, and B12 can lead to severe headaches. To maintain a balance of macro and micro-elements in your body, it’s better to buy an additional dietary supplement.Eat more fruits, vegetables, and legumes. They contain natural estrogens that neutralize the negative effects of the estrogen our body makes. It’s particularly helpful for women who suffer from migraines during their periods.Sourcelast_img read more