Siphon Creek Fire Will Likely Burn Until Autumn

first_imgDOIG RIVER, B.C. – Though previous photographs of the massive plumes of smoke emanating from the Siphon Creek Fire are dramatic, it is from directly above that the charred 853 square kilometres that the true scale of the fire is made apparent.While driving to a media tour put on by the BC Wildfire Service, the only indication of trouble is a streak of haze visible in the distance from the Rose Prairie Road about 30 kilometres north of Fort St. John. The main camp to house the crew doing battle against the conflagration sits two kilometres down a nondescript dirt road surrounded by tall trees on either side. Entering a clearing, the camp sprawls across several acres of a pasture, with a radio mast, numerous trailers, and dozens of tents to house the firefighters and support staff.- Advertisement – The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The man in charge of not only the camp, but the entire firefighting operation is Incident Commander Rob Krause, a well-seasoned firefighter who is in his 35th season with the Forest Service. Krause greets the media with a wide smile below his impressive moustache.Siphon Creek Fire Incident Commander Rob Krause. Photo credit: Chris NewtonSiphon Creek Fire Incident Commander Rob Krause. Photo credit: Chris NewtonAfter giving a quick briefing of the situation, we don red Nomex coveralls and hop into his SUV for a quick drive to another field where the helicopters battling the flames are being staged. The haze of the wildfire’s smoke quickly surrounds us, the smell permeating the SUV’s cabin. Perched atop a hill in a field, one of nearly a dozen helicopters will soon take us 2,000 ft. into the air over the fire. White Rock Staging near the Siphon Creek Fire. Photo credit: Chris Newton White Rock Staging near the Siphon Creek Fire. Photo credit: Chris Newton White Rock Staging near the Siphon Creek Fire. Photo credit: Chris Newton White Rock Staging near the Siphon Creek Fire. Photo credit: Chris Newton White Rock Staging near the Siphon Creek Fire. Photo credit: Chris Newton White Rock Staging near the Siphon Creek Fire. Photo credit: Chris Newton Incident Commander Rob Krause confers with pilot Ben Giesbrecht in front of Giesbrecht's Eurocopter AS350 B2 prior to takeoff. Photo credit: Chris Newton Incident Commander Rob Krause confers with pilot Ben Giesbrecht in front of Giesbrecht’s Eurocopter AS350 B2 prior to takeoff. Photo credit: Chris Newton Ben Giesbrecht is a veteran helicopter pilot, and is both professional and personable as he gives us a pre-flight safety briefing of his Eurocopter AS350 B2. We board, the engines roar to life, and Geisbrecht powers the chopper into the air, banking steeply to starboard in a spiralling skyward corkscrew before heading north-east.Advertisement White Rock Staging as seen from the air. Photo credit: Chris NewtonWhite Rock Staging as seen from the air. Photo credit: Chris NewtonNot five minutes in the air, the source of the haze quickly becomes apparent: Thick plumes of smoke emanate from a controlled burnout operation on the fire’s western flank. Radio chatter between Giesbrecht and the other chopper pilots around us fills the feed coming through our headphones as we trail another helicopter bucketing the flare-up through the smoke. The atmosphere onboard is one of nervous excitement. These pilots are assisting no less than 40 firefighters less than 1,000 feet below us in a war against the flames. Wagner’s “Ride of the Valkyries” could be considered suiting background music for the spectacle of three other helicopters dodging in and out of the smoke, taking turns dropping large buckets of water onto the flare-up. One of several helicopters conducting bucketing operations on the Siphon Creek Fire on May 18th. Photo credit: Chris Newton One of several helicopters conducting bucketing operations on the Siphon Creek Fire on May 18th. Photo credit: Chris Newton One of several helicopters conducting bucketing operations on the Siphon Creek Fire on May 18th. Photo credit: Chris Newton One of several helicopters conducting bucketing operations on the Siphon Creek Fire on May 18th. Photo credit: Chris Newton One of several helicopters conducting bucketing operations on the Siphon Creek Fire on May 18th. Photo credit: Chris Newton One of several helicopters conducting bucketing operations on the Siphon Creek Fire on May 18th. Photo credit: Chris Newton One of several helicopters conducting bucketing operations on the Siphon Creek Fire on May 18th. Photo credit: Chris Newton One of several helicopters conducting bucketing operations on the Siphon Creek Fire on May 18th. Photo credit: Chris Newton We climb, heading towards the fire’s head further north-east. Krause explains that the fire activity is sitting primarily at Rank 2, with some areas burning at Rank 3 (for comparison, the Fort McMurray fire was mainly burning at Rank 5 as it encroached the city 3 weeks ago). This stands in stark contrast to just two days previous when the fire grew by nearly 20,000 hectares. The landscape is a patchwork of untouched stands of spruce forest in a sea of blackened sticks. According to Krause, this is a sign of the fire moving at incredible speed. Lines of brown trees are hypothesized by crews as signs of the fire burning fierce enough to consume all available oxygen which results in incomplete combustion, leaving the trees unburned but singed by the intense heat. The patchy appearance of burned and unburned forest within the Siphon Creek Fire perimeter. Photo credit: Chris Newton The patchy appearance of burned and unburned forest within the Siphon Creek Fire perimeter. Photo credit: Chris Newton The patchy appearance of burned and unburned forest within the Siphon Creek Fire perimeter. Photo credit: Chris Newton The patchy appearance of burned and unburned forest within the Siphon Creek Fire perimeter. Photo credit: Chris Newton The patchy appearance of burned and unburned forest within the Siphon Creek Fire perimeter. Photo credit: Chris Newton The patchy appearance of burned and unburned forest within the Siphon Creek Fire perimeter. Photo credit: Chris Newton The patchy appearance of burned and unburned forest within the Siphon Creek Fire perimeter. Photo credit: Chris Newton The patchy appearance of burned and unburned forest within the Siphon Creek Fire perimeter. Photo credit: Chris Newton The patchy appearance of burned and unburned forest within the Siphon Creek Fire perimeter. Photo credit: Chris Newton The patchy appearance of burned and unburned forest within the Siphon Creek Fire perimeter. Photo credit: Chris Newton Flying around the fire’s perimeter on the return journey, Krause tells us that the lack of intense fire activity below us is due to a shift in the wind from the north, which is pushing the fire back into areas already burned. Due to less rainfall in the past several years Krause says that the water table in the Peace Region is so low that though no large flames are visible, the fire is burning and will continue to burn underground at least until the fire snows fall in autumn. In extreme cases, the blanket of snow can cause a fire to become insulated from the intense cold of winter and reappear the next spring.Advertisement Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton We briefly follow another helicopter before peeling off to our southerly track. Geisbrecht and Krause both explain that the other chopper is surveying the fire’s jagged perimeter to establish places that fire guards could be built that will contain the fire while avoiding the numerous pipelines that traverse the terrain, denoted by strips of cleared trees. Crews are unable to use these as fire guards due to the possibility of rupturing them.We circle around for one more pass of the bucketing operations, albeit this time at a much higher altitude, before heading back toward “White Rock Staging”, one of many locations around the conflagration that serve as helipads. Our pilot’s skills are demonstrated during a sharp banking right turn as he swerves the craft to avoid a bird flying in our path. After a feather-soft landing, we return to base and finish the tour with Fire Information Officer Erin Catherall.Fire Information Officer Erin Catherall. Photo credit: Chris NewtonFire Information Officer Erin Catherall. Photo credit: Chris NewtonCatherall explains that the base, which can be set up in a little as 48 hours, can accommodate up to 300 personnel. The base will continue to operate for at least the next month as crews attempt to fully contain the fire within the perimeter. Krause says that monitoring the fire once it is fully contained will the focus of crews, not fully extinguishing it. A map of the Siphon Creek Fire from May 18th set up in the command post Briefing Tent. Photo credit: Chris Newton A map of the Siphon Creek Fire from May 18th set up in the command post Briefing Tent. Photo credit: Chris Newton The northern flank of the Siphon Creek Fire on May 18th, known as the head of the fire. Photo credit: Chris Newton The northern flank of the Siphon Creek Fire on May 18th, known as the head of the fire. Photo credit: Chris Newton The western flank of the Siphon Creek Fire where helicopter crews were conducting bucketing operations on May 18th. Photo credt: Chris Newton The western flank of the Siphon Creek Fire where helicopter crews were conducting bucketing operations on May 18th. Photo credt: Chris Newton As of Friday May 20th,  168 firefighters, 4 helicopters, and 11 pieces of heavy equipment are currently battling the fire on the BC side of the Alberta border. Today a new Ontario incident management team is taking over command on the Alberta side of the border, and is collaborating firefighting efforts with their colleagues from BC.Advertisementlast_img read more

Manure management strategies

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Reducing manure volumes produced throughout the year is certainly worth considering when building a manure management plan. For example, what goes into your manure pit other than manure, urine and wash water? Additionally, it is important to note waste water can be from several sources, including:1. Leaking drinkers and water lines,2. Pigs wasting water when they drink; and,3. Rain water entering the pit.Leaking drinkers and water lines: One way to determine how many gallons go into the pit on a daily basis is to take a water meter reading when there are no pigs in the barn or no washing activities planned. Check the reading after a 24-hours. According to Adam Hocker’s 2014 Pork Congress presentation, Brenneman Pork in Iowa had records from 22 finishing barns that were leaking on average 4,000 gallons of water per week. That would be over 200,000 gallons of wasted water in a 2,400 head barn per year. Kevin Elder with the Ohio Department of Agriculture said, “Additional research has shown the diluted manure moves easier to subsurface tile. If manure has at least 4% solids and even better 8% solids it moves much less to drainage tile.” Pigs wasting water when they drinkResearch has shown there are differences in the amount of water wasted from drinkers of varying styles. As such, it is recommended to check the flow rate of your existing drinkers. Pigs only consume water at a given rate, dependent upon the size of pig, and higher flow rates lead to more wasted water. Research shows that water flow for a nursery should not exceed 45 seconds to fill a 16-ounce container. Comparatively, the flow rate for a grow finish should not exceed 30 seconds to fill a 16-ounce container. Water line pressure should be 20 psi; however, it is important to make sure you have adequate flow rates throughout the barn. If drinker height is adjustable be sure to adjust as pigs get bigger. In general, nipple height should be at pig shoulder level, or slightly above. Rain water entering the pitEvaluate outside landscaping (settling ground), especially around pump out ports to determine if surface water is entering the pit. There are barns that have pump-out ports that have separated, or cracked, from the pit walls and have allowed roof water to enter the pits. Be sure rainwater is diverted away from the building, and make any necessary repairs to pump-out ports. There should be no ponding water around the building after rainfall events. Developing an emergency planDevelop an emergency plan in the event field conditions do not allow for manure application when the pit is almost full. While options vary on location, below are several conditions to consider that might allow for you to partially pump down your pit:1. A neighbor with a dairy lagoon that is not full and would accept hog manure.2. A custom manure applicator with frac tanks or tankers for emergency storage.3. An older swine facility that is currently empty.4. A municipality sewage treatment plant that would take manure.5. Contact your local Soil and Water Conservation District Office to discuss local options: http://www.agri.ohio.gov/divs/SWC/SearchLocalSWCD.aspx6. Constructing emergency storage as a last resort (This has been done before and is cheaper than paying fines and having bad publicity), contact local SWCD or ODA-Division of Livestock Environmental Permitting.For additional information on best manure strategies, please visit https://ohleap.org/last_img read more

Joe Gibbs dedicates Daytona 500 victory to late son

first_imgPDEA chief backs Robredo in revealing ‘discoveries’ on drug war Grace Poe files bill to protect govt teachers from malicious accusations ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes DAYTONA BEACH, FL – FEBRUARY 17: Denny Hamlin, driver of the #11 FedEx Express Toyota, celebrates in victory lane with team owner Joe Gibbs after winning the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series 61st Annual Daytona 500 at Daytona International Speedway on February 17, 2019 in Daytona Beach, Florida. Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images/AFPDAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — Joe Gibbs closed his eyes during a tribute lap for his late son, while crew members raised a banner to honor the co-founder of Joe Gibbs Racing.J.D. Gibbs had been hand-picked by his father to run the organization, changed tires during the early seasons, had a brief stint as a driver, pushed for a pivotal switch to Toyota and discovered Denny Hamlin. He signed Hamlin to drive the No. 11, his number from his football days, and it is his name above the driver door on Hamlin’s car.ADVERTISEMENT SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte Women’s basketball teams honor cancer survivors Urgent reply from Philippine ‍football chief Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. J.D. Gibbs died last month following a long battle with a degenerative neurological disease and Hamlin dedicated this NASCAR season to Gibbs’ memory.When Hamlin crossed the finish line Sunday night to win his second Daytona 500 in four years, Joe Gibbs could not hold back what the moment meant to him. A Hall of Fame NFL coach with three Super Bowl victories ranked JGR’s third Daytona 500 win as top.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption charges“It’s the most emotional and the biggest win I’ve ever had in my life in anything” Gibbs said. “J.D. built our race team, was the guy that ran day to day operations for 27 years. He invested his occupational life in our race team. It was the most important night in my occupational life.“I know J.D. and everybody in my family was emotional.” LATEST STORIES Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town US judge bars Trump’s health insurance rule for immigrants MOST READ View comments Busch, now winless in 14 Daytona 500s, was initially openly disappointed in falling short.“He’s got two, I’ve got none, and that’s just the way it goes sometimes,” Busch said.But he reiterated the JGR and Toyota goal of working together to win the race and noted he didn’t have much of a shot at beating Hamlin because the field had been decimated by a flurry of late accidents.“Was trying to make sure one of us gets to victory lane, first and foremost,” Busch said. “There wasn’t enough cars out there running at the end. I don’t know how it would have played out.”Hamlin and Busch alternated as the leaders during the handful of late restarts, and the final rush to the checkered flag was a push to hold off Ford driver and reigning NASCAR champion Joey Logano. The Ford camp went 1-2-3 in both of Thursday’s qualifying races and was favored to win the Daytona 500.Logano, who started his career at JGR, settled for fourth and also took a moment to honor J.D. Gibbs.“I’m not a Gibbs driver but for what J.D. has done for my career is the reason why I’m sitting here today,” Logano said. “As bad as I want to win it, it is pretty cool to think that the first race after his passing, to see those guys one, two, three, it just says he’s up there watching and maybe gave (those) guys a little extra boost there at the end.”Hamlin last year suffered through his first winless season in the Cup Series and made a crew chief change during the offseason. When he won the 500 in 2016 it was his debut race with crew chief Mike Wheeler, and this victory came in his first race with Chris Gabehart.Hamlin’s first Daytona 500 victory was in a photo finish against Martin Truex Jr. and the celebration was a blur. This one, he said, he will enjoy.“I think I was so dumbfounded about everything that happened the first time with the photo finish and everything,” Hamlin said. “This one lets me soak it in a little bit more. I’m going to have a terrible hangover tomorrow, but I’m going to enjoy it the rest of my life.” Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Hamlin came to Daytona determined to honor his late car owner with a victory.He delivered a storybook tribute.Hamlin led JGR in a 1-2-3 sweep of the podium in overtime and was met in victory lane by the entire Gibbs family, including J.D.’s widow and four sons.“He meant a lot to me and it’s hard for me not getting choked up because I’ve been choked up about 100 times about it,” Hamlin said. “Just to have Melissa (Gibbs) and all the kids here, it’s just crazy.”Kyle Busch and Erik Jones finished second and third as JGR became the second team in NASCAR history to sweep the Daytona 500 podium. Hendrick Motorsports did it in 1997 with Jeff Gordon, Terry Labonte and Ricky Craven.ADVERTISEMENT Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krausslast_img read more