Watch Bruce Hornsby Perform With The Roots On Last Night’s Fallon Episode

first_imgIn anticipation of the release for his newest album, Rehab Reunion, both Bruce Hornsby and his Noisemakers drummer Sonny Emory sat in with The Roots on house band duties throughout last night’s episode of The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon. Hornsby played the Appalachian Dulcimer, while Emory added to percussion on the washboard, as the full house band played segments of songs that appear on Rehab Reunion, which is due out this Friday, June 17th.Bruce Hornsby Offers Full Stream Of New Album, ‘Rehab Reunion’ [Listen]Fallon also brought along a co-host for the evening, former Late Night host Jay Leno. The two performed the opening dialogue together and traded jokes back and forth over the course of the show. Check out the entire show below, including a performance of the Hornsby classic “The Way It Is” at 29:30, as the show went in and out of the commercial break:last_img read more

Rose makes banking return at ABN Amro

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Ffion makes history thanks to Girls Golf Rocks

first_img Tags: Eaton Golf Club, Ffion Jones, Girls Golf Rocks Girls Golf really Rocks for Cheshire teenager Ffion Jones who is about to make history as the first female junior captain at her club.Ffion, who only started playing golf 14 months ago thanks to the Girls Golf Rocks campaign, will be the 2018 junior captain at Eaton Golf Club in Chester.The 17-year-old got into golf after her mum spotted an advert for Girls Golf Rocks, the recruitment campaign run by England Golf and the Golf Foundation which inspires more girls to take up the game.At first Ffion was reluctant to go along to the taster session at Eaton as she didn’t think she would know anyone. But when she arrived she found she knew several of the other girls and in her own words “golf was a lot better than I thought.”In fact, she enjoyed golf so much so that when her Gran offered to buy her a junior membership at Eaton for Christmas she jumped at the chance to join the club. She’s since been followed by her 11-year-old brother and the two of them can be found practising together at the club on most days.Over the last 12 months Ffion has lowered her handicap from 36 to 21.8 and was the most improved woman golfer of the year for 2017. She has also played for Eaton in matches against other local clubs, is currently playing in Eaton’s junior winter league and recently, along with her brother, their friend and one of the clubs pros, won a night golf competition where they were the only juniors playing.Ffion is studying for her A Levels at Christleton High School and then will take a gap year when she plans to work and play as much golf as possible to achieve her aim of getting her handicap down to single figures.She will also be carrying out her role as junior captain throughout 2018 and hopes that this will help her to get to know the other juniors better and encourage more girls to become members of Eaton Golf Club. She would especially like to see more girls playing in the winter junior league next year to redress the balance in the league which this year has three girls and 19 boys taking part.Eaton’s Head PGA Professional Bill Tye, commented: “I could tell from the start that Ffion was a talented ball player and she has excelled. She’s really, really keen, completely hooked on the game and we thought we would give her this honour.”Ffion’s mum Hilary Jones – who is not a golfer – said: “All the members and the staff at Eaton Golf Club have been really good to the juniors at Eaton and I’m really pleased that I signed Ffion up for Girls Golf Rocks. It’s also great for me to see Ffion and her younger brother enjoying an activity together, golf is good for them as a physical activity but it also teaches them other things such as honesty and respect “.Ffion herself says:  “I really wish my mum had signed me up for golf years ago, I enjoy it so much and am really excited to be Eaton’s first female junior captain.’Alison Lysons, England Golf Club Support Officer in Cheshire commented “It’s exciting to hear that someone coming through the Girls Golf Rocks programme has developed such a love for golf and is becoming her club’s first female junior captain. Eaton Golf Club has a great junior programme and Ffion’s experience will be invaluable in encouraging other young girls to take up the game of golf there”.Lauren Spray, Women and Girls’ Participation Manager at England Golf added: “It’s fantastic to see how quickly Ffion has progressed through the programme, attaining a handicap in such a short space of time and getting it down to 22 is fantastic to hear.“As part of Girls Golf Rocks we ask girls to become county ambassadors to inspire new girls who come into the programme. By being appointed junior captain Ffion will now be one of those vital role models to new girls coming into the programme and at Eaton. This is a fantastic success and we wish Ffion all the best with her A Levels and her year as junior captain!”For more information about Girls Golf Rocks click here For more information about junior golf at Eaton Golf Club contact Bill Tye at [email protected] center_img 17 Dec 2017 Ffion makes history thanks to Girls Golf Rocks last_img read more

Power to the People: Colts Neck Hires Firm to Help Reduce…

first_imgBy John BurtonCOLTS NECK – The township committee is hoping its recent move to hire an energy-consulting firm will result in savings on residents’ electric bills.The township committee voted to retain Gabel Associates of Highland Park during its Aug. 28 meeting. The firm will act as the township’s consultant to negotiate with energy providers to secure a lower rate than residents and businesses currently can get.Gabel, which has assisted hundreds of school districts with energy needs over the years, began working with municipalities about 18 months ago as a community energy aggregation consultant.So far, Gabel has completed projects for Toms River and Plumstead Township and has secured energy rates that are 14 and 11 percent lower than what users had been paying, according to Ken Esser, a senior associate for Gabel.The firm is currently working with a number of other municipalities.Assemblyman Declan O’Scanlon, R-Monmouth, is working as an independent consultant for Gabel.“For me, it’s an opportunity to see residents of my district and the people of New Jersey at-large save money, especially when there’s no risk,” he said. “I’m inclined to get involved to have that happen.”As a consultant for Gabel, O’Scanlon works with representatives from municipal governments, explaining the benefits of having Gabel pursue lower energy rates for the community.In Colts Neck, Mayor Michael Fitzgerald said the township committee received six responses to its request for proposals. Fitzgerald supported Gabel, “because they were successful in a couple of towns” already.What happens in such arrangements is that Gabel Associates, an energy and public utility consulting company, works with a municipality to find an energy provider with rates lower than those being offered by its present provider. In Colts Neck, Jersey Central Power and Light (JCP&L) will continue to deliver the power but the source of the power will be another company as negotiated by Gabel. Home and business owners will still receive their bills from JCP&L, but hopefully at a lower rate.The negotiation of such arrangements is permitted under the state’s Energy Aggregation Act, which the Legislation passed in 2003.According Esser, there is “no out-of-pocket expenses for the municipality in any way,” as his firm earns its fee by factoring it into the total per kilowatt-hour charge that will be paid for by the user. Users new electric rate will be at least 5 to 10 percent lower than currently and could be even lower.Gabel looks for providers to secure the lower rates for a fixed period, usually for one or two years. Customers are not required to opt in and can opt out at any time, Esser said.O’Scanlon said works for the company to educate municipal officials on community energy aggregation and advises Gabel on strategy and other business facets.“He’s really an important part of our team,” Esser said.O’Scanlon, along with his Assembly obligations, runs FSD Enterprises, LLC, in Red Bank, a consulting firm that assists municipalities negotiating with wireless communications providers.Under state law, O’Scanlon is permitted to work with municipalities within his district.“I go out of my way to avoid any potential accusation of conflict of interest,” said O’Scanlon, who is not paid by municipalities but acts as a paid representative of Gabel.Fitzgerald said he expects the average homeowner in his community who participates to see as much as a $200 saving annually on the electric bill.“Every year it seems we have to tell the residents here it’s going to cost them more in taxes,” Fitzgerald said. “If we find a way to save them $200 a year it makes the pain a little bit more tolerable.”There are no big ways to save taxpayers money; it’s up to officials to find as many little ways as possible to save and hope they curb costs cumulatively, O’Scanlon said.“You explore everything,” he said.Among the municipalities Gabel is now working with are Montgomery Township in Somerset County, Monroe, Lambertville and West Orange, Esser said.Colts Neck has been approached by six or seven communities looking for information about the township’s experiences, Fitzgerald said.last_img read more

Mentoring One Child at a Time, Over Time

first_img“Justin changed my life,” D.J. said about his mentor, who is the most important male role model in his world. “I don’t think I would be here without him.”January is National Mentoring Month. Groups like Big Brothers Big Sisters of Monmouth & Middlesex Counties are hoping to bring attention to use the moment to recruit more “big siblings,” especially men, to make a positive difference in a young person’s life.“Everyone has had a mentor in life,” said Marybeth Bull, a resident of Fair Haven who is also director of development at Big Brothers Big Sisters of Monmouth & Middlesex Counties (BBBS). “Whether it was a family member, or a boss, somebody in their life who has been there for them and showed them the way and been a positive person in their life.”You don’t need special skills. “You just have to be willing to share time with a child that needs a positive person in their life,” Bull said.Adults 19 years or older who can commit to spend four to six hours a month for at least a year, are great candidates for the volunteer position, she said.“To be a friend, spend time, be an ear for them, be a shoulder for them,” she said. “To point them in the right direction.”Headquartered in Asbury Park, BBBS currently serves 700 children in its program across Monmouth and Middlesex counties.“Littles” – who range in age from 6 to 15 years old – usually join the program at school and may be referred by guidance counselors and other social organizations. They are often from single parent households. The BBBS typically provides girls with a female mentor and boys with a male mentor. Bull said a woman can be a Big Sister to a young boy in certain circumstances, because there are many more female mentors than males. The program has an acute need for men to volunteer as Big Brothers for the large number of boys on the waiting list.Mentors undergo in-depth interviews. Screened applicants are matched with Littles based on similar interests, hobbies, and personal traits. “We’re not going to match a kid who wants to go to the library with someone who wants to play basketball,” Bull said.Although some duos may not immediately hit it off, Bull said matches are usually successful. “We have a wonderful length of our matches,” she said. “An average of 3 ½ years more than the national averages. And a lot of people stay in touch for a lifetime.”Training and case managers who check in regularly and monthly group activities with other Bigs and Littles, help a new mentor break the ice. “We let them know they’re not alone,” said Bull.Bull said the program stresses the duo should participate in low cost, simple activities, such as a trip to the park or shooting hoops. “It’s about building a friendship,” she said. “The child needs special one-to-one attention.”In addition to the traditional community-based programs, BBBS has other programs including one at Monmouth University that pairs college student mentors with Asbury Park high school students, similar to a peer-to-peer mentoring relationship.Bull finds many of the Littles in the program never thought about college but after meeting with the college students and touring the university, they “start to really see themselves in that environment.”She cites a Little Brother who not only went on to attend Monmouth University, but is now a Big Brother in the program.In addition, a program focused on a workplace environment, like Monmouth Medical Center and New Jersey Natural Gas, matches employees at all levels – from IT techs to senior vice presidents – with Littles.“The kids get a sense of a lot of different opportunities,” Bull said.Mentoring allows volunteers a chance to “see life through a child’s eyes again,” said Bull, who has been with BBBS for 15 years. “I’ve gotten to see how it makes such a difference in an impressionable child. How this person can impart their wisdom and help with everything from homework to life skills. D.J. and his Big Brother Justin Brown celebrate D.J.’s induction to the National Honor Society last year. Photo: BBBS“From Day One, it felt so natural, the first time we hung out,” said Justin Brown, 35, who became a Big Brother to D.J. in 2010. “He has such a wide-open personality.” (At the BBBS request, D.J.’s last name is being withheld to protect his privacy.)As a teacher, previously at Lakewood High School and now at Neptune High School, Brown said he sees a lot of kids “missing that strong role model.”In those early days, when D.J. was in 7th grade, he and Brown would go for pizza or take a trip to the beach.D.J. was an active Boy Scout – he is now working on his Eagle Scout project – so they found a common interest in the outdoors. “We did a lot of outdoor stuff – hiking, kayaking,” said Brown, who was also a Boy Scout. “It was all the things I like to do.”“D.J. comes from a good family,” Brown said, and credits D.J.’s grandmother for being very involved in his life. With an older sister who went to college, it was always expected that D.J. would go on for a degree. “His grandmother was pushing him not to let outside forces take him down the wrong road.”As a Big Brother, Brown said, “I think I gave him a big-picture perspective.”“It’s been just a good feeling, just to be there, to see him grow so much,” said Brown. “It’s been a positive influence in my life, too.“As a teacher you develop bonds with students, but with D.J., I really feel he’s part of my family.“He’s just my little brother,” said Brown, “he’s been part of my life.”So much so that two years ago D.J. served as a groomsman in Brown’s wedding.“D.J. will be part of my life forever.”For D.J., who will turn 18 soon, much of his high school senior year has been spent getting ready for college. He has already been accepted to a host of schools, including NJIT, University of Delaware, Drexel University, SUNY Alfred and Monmouth University, and is waiting on decisions from a few more. He plans to study medical engineering.Both men agree college was always in D.J.’s plans.“My grades were spot on – A’s and B’s,” D.J. said. “It was the internal stuff” that he feels he needed from his Big Brother.“I live in a family full of girls,” said D.J. “I have 10 half sisters.”Over the years, D.J. consulted with Brown about everything from homework and colleges to social pressures and girls.“He’s got the girl thing covered,” D.J. said.As mentors go, D.J. thinks his match was perfect. “We share nearly everything in common. He likes everything I love to do,” said D.J. “He’s actually a brother to me.”And now D.J. looks forward to his new role: as “big brother” to Brown’s 5-month old son River. So too will be a special person in his life – his “Big Brother” Justin Brown, a 35- year-old high school teacher who volunteers his time through Big Brothers Big Sisters. By Judy O’Gorman AlvarezWhen high school senior D.J. accepts his diploma at Long Branch High School graduation this June, his family will be proudly watching. “If you think about one child at a time,” she said, and then “if you look at the big picture, it changes lives for generations.”last_img read more