A leap across the pond

first_imgMichael George ’15 says his passion is a personal one. Growing up in the Philippines, George lived a divided life — his parents’ employers would pay for him to go to a private American school, while his best friend took a Jeepney to the local school. George left the Philippines for Harvard, while his friend stayed behind — and that’s stayed with him.“As an American who grew up overseas in the developing world, it was eye-opening for me to move home and realize that, in one of the richest countries in world, 1 in 4 children live in poverty and that 1 out of 4 will remain there as adults,” he said.When George departs Harvard, he’ll head to England on a prestigious Marshall Scholarship to study comparative social policy at the University of Oxford and economic history at the London School of Economics.Anna Hagen ’15 will be nearby. Hagen, an English concentrator by way of Brooklyn, “fell in love with language as a kid.” Along with her study of literature, Hagen has immersed herself in theater at Harvard. After the Boston Marathon bombings, she produced Euripides’ “The Bacchae,” she said, “not only because I wanted to make sense of its frenzied chorus and long, poetic messenger speeches, but because I felt in need of the play’s strength and exuberance.”Under the direction of Professor Amy Hempel, Hagen is working on a book of short stories for her senior thesis; with her Marshall Scholarship she plans to pursue a master’s degree in contemporary English literature at the University of Cambridge and a secondary master’s degree in theater marking at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art.“I’m passionate about storytelling, and the Marshall means the chance to think about what stories I want to tell, and how best to tell them,” said Hagen. “I look forward to immersing myself in another culture and learning from a vibrant community of friends and scholars. I expect the next two years to be life-changing.”Up to 40 students are selected annually for Marshall Scholarships, which support young Americans in graduate studies in the United Kingdom.“I’m drawn to the U.K. not only because of the incredible academic opportunities, but also because the U.K. is at the forefront of innovative public policy,” said George. “Being there will allow me to see how I can apply these ideas elsewhere.”Both George and Hagen are still getting their heads around the honor.“I was racing out of Lowell dining hall to get to the Loeb Theater and to the last performance of ‘Three Sisters,’ the show I spent the semester directing, when I got the phone call,” recalled Hagen. “My heart was pounding. My legs felt like Jell-O. I couldn’t believe it. I gave the phone to a friend so I would know it was real. I still don’t quite believe it.”“When it finally hit me what the person on the other end of the line was saying, I was overwhelmed,” said George. “I could kind of feel the course of my life shifting beneath my feet.”last_img read more

Cannabis gummy bears could be banned under law reform

first_imgNewsHub 9 May 2019Family First Comment: Far more to worry about than just gummi bears.This shows just how naïve OR misleading the Greens are being around the real risks of cannabis products. #saynopetodopeGreen MP Chlöe Swarbrick has brushed off National’s concerns around cannabis-infused edibles, suggesting most types will likely be banned.National’s drug law reform spokesperson Paula Bennett said cannabis-infused edibles could be “dressed up so they’re appealing to young people and accidental use is of real concern”.Swarbrick wouldn’t confirm cannabis-infused gummy bears would definitely be banned, but said there was consensus among the Greens, Labour and New Zealand First that protecting children and displacing the black market were top priorities.“In line with all of those things, it’s pretty evident that we will be following what other jurisdictions have done in terms of banning or ensuring that we won’t have gummy bears.”Swarbrick said there’s no way with the Government’s “health-based approach” to drug reform that “we would be enabling products that could be argued as targeted towards children”.She said there will be “nothing to glorify the consumption of cannabis” – and actually, “quite the opposite because there will be public education campaigns about the harms”.Swarbrick wouldn’t confirm cannabis-infused gummy bears would definitely be banned, but said there was consensus among the Greens, Labour and New Zealand First that protecting children and displacing the black market were top priorities.“In line with all of those things, it’s pretty evident that we will be following what other jurisdictions have done in terms of banning or ensuring that we won’t have gummy bears.”Swarbrick said there’s no way with the Government’s “health-based approach” to drug reform that “we would be enabling products that could be argued as targeted towards children”.She said there will be “nothing to glorify the consumption of cannabis” – and actually, “quite the opposite because there will be public education campaigns about the harms”.Comparing cannabis-infused lollies to alcohol-soaked lollies, Bennett said: “You’re not going to get absolutely drunk off a couple of vodka-soaked lollies, but you can get absolutely wasted on a few concentrated marijuana [edibles].”READ MORE: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/politics/2019/05/cannabis-gummy-bears-could-be-banned-under-law-reform.htmllast_img read more

Men’s hockey: Badgers add Ryder Donovan to already strong 2019 recruitment class

first_imgThe University of Wisconsin men’s hockey team turned heads in the recruitment world this past week with the addition of Minnesota native Ryder Donovan to play for the Badgers next year.Donovan, a talented center from Duluth East High School, will join other forwards — Alex Turcotte, Cole Caufield and Owen Lindmark — in next season’s talented incoming freshman class. Donovan will also have the opportunity to play with returning players such as Sean Dhooghe and K’Andre Miller.Donovan signed his National Letter of Intent Monday after backing out of his original commitment to North Dakota last fall. After attending Coach Tony Granato’s hockey camp at UW in the summer of 2016, the two built a strong relationship that was enough for Donovan to commit to UW for his journey through college hockey.Men’s hockey: A look back at Mark Johnson’s legendary careerThousands of Wisconsin fans packed the Kohl Center last Saturday night as the University of Wisconsin’s men’s hockey team was Read…Granato was very excited and optimistic about Donovan’s play and how he would fit in with the Badgers next season.“[He has] lots of great potential to be a big impact player similar to the other players we’re are bringing in,” Granato said in a Wisconsin Hockey press release. “They’ll complement each other well.”He also called Donovan “an elite talent and a hard-working kid.”The six-foot-four, 185-pound centreman averaged two points a game last season. He notched 62 points in 31 games for Duluth East High School and captained the team to the third seed in Minnesota’s high school state championship, before losing to the No. 1 seeded Minnetonka.As this season’s playoffs approach, he has 12 goals and 25 assists in 23 games.Men’s hockey: Badger seek late season momentum to raise Big Ten tournament rankingWith only four games remaining, the University of Wisconsin Men’s hockey team’s (10-15-5, 6-9-5 Big Ten) 2018-19 regular season is Read…Donovan ranks 46th in the top 50 of North American skaters for the 2019 draft by NHL Central Scouting.He represented the U.S. on the Under-18 Select Team at the 2017 Hlinka Gretzky Cup, where he scored the game-winning goal in overtime against Finland to win the U.S. fifth place.Ryder brings the Badgers an impressive amount of speed and his stats show his excellent ability to finish at the net. His advanced hockey sense and vision allow him to benefit his teammates to a momentous extent. Overall Donovan’s game can complement the skills of other incoming freshmen and returning Badgers next season. This skill, along with the many more on his resume, will help him achieve his potential as an elite power forward for Wisconsin.Moving into the 2019-20 season, Granato and the Badgers can look forward to a player who is going to put forth his best effort and also play a major role for Wisconsin in the future.last_img read more