Communicating in the new age of the digital banker

first_img 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Clay McNaught Clay McNaught is Vice President at GMC Software Technology, North America. With an impressive history of experience in document management, customer communication management and business intelligence, McNaught offers extensive knowledge … Web: www.gmc.net Details Much has been written about how banking organizations large and small have been caught flat-footed in the face of the digital disruptions taking place in the financial industry. On the bright side, a recent Accenture study concludes that, “Forward-thinking banks are differentiating themselves through continuous innovation such as beginning the digital journey, developing convenient mobile banking solutions and connecting with entirely new customer segments. None of this was even a thought just five years ago. This is an industry that’s on the move.”One thing is clear—simply offering online banking options or the ability to embed a PDF of a statement into an email does not constitute a digital member communications strategy. Credit union members want (and expect) more. True digital bankers will have the capability to follow their customers along their financial and increasingly digital journey, developing new touch points and digital offerings along the way.Mobile has changed the landscapeMobile is driving this trend and desire for instant access to all services, not just account transactions. For example, the Accenture study cites mBank of Poland’s Quick Loan program that allows customers to request a loan online or on a mobile device and receive a response approving or declining the loan from mBank within 30 seconds. Differentiation will require innovative capabilities like Quick Loan, including:Mobile onboarding and account openingE-signature applications that align with customer communication management systemsSingle capture of member information that populates and updates all relevant systems, andThe creation of dynamic (versus static) communications for member statements and other communications, enabling the member to create custom views and engage with videos as well as interactive charts and graphs.All of this highlights the shift taking place in the credit union customer experience from a transaction-centric focus to a value-added focus.Moving beyond multichannel Today’s customers no longer have a mere preference for multichannel interaction with their credit union, it is an expectation. Moreover, beyond the expectation for multichannel, members really want an omnichannel experience—for example, allowing them to begin a transaction on their smartphone and pick up the interaction on their PC. Credit unions need to leverage the latest technologies for responsive design that deliver a seamless, consistent online experience regardless of the channel the customer happens to choose. Delivering anything less will undermine member loyalty.Mining data for a personalized experienceAccenture aptly observes that “…banks have a wealth of customer data to guide them in shaping the next generation of customer experiences.” However, another Accenture study notes that while a majority of customers would like their banking organization to proactively recommend products and services that match their financial needs, they see a disconnect between the traditional and digital experiences they receive.Putting a Customer Communications Management (CCM) strategy in place that enables business users to easily leverage customer data will support your credit union’s efforts to forge lasting, multi-layered relationships with members through highly personalized and targeted communications delivered over digital or print channels. Implementing a CCM strategy of this kind will reduce confusion and service calls, promote education and build loyalty. Costs are reduced by eliminating the need to develop separate communications packages.With a recent survey commissioned by GMC Software Technology showing that 72 percent of banking customers want to request the format in which they receive information from their bank, along with 48 percent of them feeling their bank doesn’t value them, it is critical for all banking organizations to have modern, responsive customer communications capabilities that make them a partner in their customers’ digital lives.Differentiation in today’s competitive environment is a question of what you do to meet member expectations, as well as how quickly you can do it. Communicating as a true digital banker with customers who move at the speed of light means finding solutions that make it easy to transform valuable member data into relevant, personalized digital communications.last_img read more

Shooting shift carries Wisconsin over Indiana, 69-58

first_imgWisconsin is a scary team when it shoots well. The Badgers are also a scary team when they shoot poorly. It’s just a different type of scary, one the Badgers can’t prefer.That polarization was on full force at the Kohl Center, defining the two halves of basketball between Wisconsin and Indiana Tuesday night. It wound up being strong enough in the Badgers’ favor during the second half to lead Wisconsin in its 69-58 victory over the Hoosiers.In doing so, it was another rendition displaying just how the Badgers (23-5, 10-5) win games at this point in the season. For Wisconsin, with an improved defense from the doldrums that garnered five losses in six games, winning games in February seems to depend almost directly on the Badgers’ shooting tendencies.Although it ended well for UW, it didn’t begin pretty. That ugly pole of horror was on display for the first 20 minutes as Wisconsin netted just 19 points — trailing Indiana’s 29 — on seven buckets for a first half rate of just 25.9 percent.The frustration could have prompted a furious Bo Ryan in the locker room, with his team down 10 to the unranked, struggling Hoosiers (15-12, 5-9).“The halftime talk had nothing to do with threats, violence, none of that,” Ryan said. “It was, ‘We know what we can do, we’ve just gotta do it.’”They did, and then some.With their most prevalent three-point shooter Ben Brust continuing to struggle in the first half, it was almost too perfect that his spark lit the fire under the lifeless Badgers.After missing all four attempts from beyond the arc in the first half, a trend of Brust bricks had swelled. Wisconsin’s sniper had made just one of his last 17 tries from distance over his last five halves of basketball.But then he made one.“I knew it was only a matter of time,” Brust said. “I knew it was going to start, so I was just like, ‘Can it just start now?’”Just 45 seconds after he hit the first one, Brust squared away and connected on another. Thoughts of that scoreless first half were far from the Kohl Center.No more than two-and-a-half minutes passed by before Brust hit his third triple of the second half. This one put Wisconsin up 41-38, a lead it would never surrender, largely because its shooting took off even stronger.“It was definitely good to get a couple to go down,” Brust said. “I think it ignited this team and just trickled down to everyone else … It just kind of got us going and opened things up.”Following Brust’s triad of triples, Wisconsin made six of its next nine shots, extending its lead to its highest point at 58-43, and just about everyone got involved.Sam Dekker and Bronson Koenig found a few layups before Josh Gasser and Traevon Jackson found three pointers. In sum, Wisconsin shot nearly 62 percent in the second half — going 13-for-21 from the field. After just a 1-for-10 performance from beyond the arc in the putrid first half, the Badgers made six of 11 threes in the final 20 minutes.When a team is clicking like the Badgers were in that second half, pressure was sure to increase for the visiting Hoosiers. An array of Badgers’ buckets can seemingly tighten the rim on the opposite end of the floor as Indiana tried to keep pace.Then as they rushed to get stops on the defensive end, Wisconsin’s end of the floor seemed a little more wide open each time. Their shooting percentage justly followed suit.“A lot of times you’re getting ready for one or two guys to be very good passers. Their whole team is,” Indiana coach Tom Crean said. “The bottom line is: They got some good looks because we were in rotation a little bit.“They got hot. The basket started looking pretty big for them.”Coupled with a defense that didn’t allow a single 30-point half — which they did twice when in losing fashion during the January game in Bloomington, Ind. — Wisconsin’s hot shooting now seems good enough to take them wherever they please.“When the ball goes through the hoop, it makes a lot of things easier,” Dekker said. “People think it’s some crazy magic that happened, but no. We made shots and made some plays … we just ran our plays and it worked.”last_img read more