In-form internationals head to Wales

first_img Three in-form internationals will represent England Golf in the team event at the Welsh ladies’ open stroke play championship at Southerndown from Friday to Sunday, 1-3 May. Gemma Clews (Delamere Forest) and Inci Mehmet (Royal Mid Surrey) both tied fourth in last weekend’s Helen Holm Scottish open stroke play. The third member of the team, Sophie Lamb (Clitheroe), shared eighth place. Clews, 20, helped England into second place in the Nations Cup event at the Helen Holm. She has also recently won the Delamere Comboy scratch at her own club and had top five finishes in The Leveret, at Formby Ladies’, and the Hampshire Rose at North Hants. Lamb, 17, and Clews, have both been selected for the England v Spain international at Burnham & Berrow on May 9 and 10. It will be the first time that mixed teams have played in this fixture. Mehmet, 18, (image © Leaderboard Photography) was joint runner-up in the Hampshire Rose and was the third best amateur at the recent Roehampton Gold Cup. The team event will be played across all three rounds of the Welsh championship, with the best two scores counting in each. For the first time this year the championship is being played over three days, instead of two. The field will be cut to the top 50 and ties for Sunday’s final round. 29 Apr 2015 In-form internationals head to Wales last_img read more

Darren achieves English golf’s first DEAFinitely Inclusive Mark

first_img27 Sep 2016 Darren achieves English golf’s first DEAFinitely Inclusive Mark Lincolnshire PGA professional Darren Game has achieved golf’s first DEAFinitely Inclusive Mark in England. DEAFinitely Inclusive is UK Deaf Sports’ programme to provide deaf and hard of hearing people with information about clubs and facilities so they can be confident of receiving a fun and friendly sporting experience. The DEAFinitely Inclusive Mark is a quality assurance mark that deaf and hard of hearing people will receive a good service, including: • Coaches trained in deaf awareness • Clear details of how to contact the club by text or email • Support and expertise on how to develop as a player coach or volunteer Game, who teaches at his indoor Bourne Golf Centre and his Lincolnshire Junior Academy at Toft Golf Club, said: “Golf is a great sport for deaf and disabled people, whether it’s developing your own skills and etiquette or playing as part of a team. “Making the game accessible to all within the local community is a passion of mine and obtaining the DEAFinitely Inclusive Mark will open up the game to more people.” Becoming DEAFinitely Inclusive was a key aim for Game as he continued to develop his skills and make his existing coaching and playing opportunities more inclusive of deaf and hard of hearing people. He is a keen advocate that golf can be a game for all and has worked hard to develop links in his local area. These include Willoughby School where pupils with a range of impairments have benefitted from being involved in golf. Two of the pupils are continuing their golf at Toft, where Game has a junior development role. Jamie Blair, Disability Manager for England Golf commented: “It is really pleasing to see a coach and a facility make a strong commitment to including deaf participants in their golfing activity. “England Golf will continue to encourage more facilities to adopt the Mark and engage with their local deaf networks in partnership with UK Deaf Sport and England Deaf Golf.” Clive Breedon, National Participation Officer from UK Deaf Sport commented: “UK Deaf Sport are very pleased to accredit Bourne Golf Centre and their work with The Lincolnshire Junior Golf Academy as DEAFinitely Inclusive. Darren is keen to make golf accessible to people who are deaf or hard of hearing so we look forward to supporting him to do so.”last_img read more

Mentoring One Child at a Time, Over Time

first_img“Justin changed my life,” D.J. said about his mentor, who is the most important male role model in his world. “I don’t think I would be here without him.”January is National Mentoring Month. Groups like Big Brothers Big Sisters of Monmouth & Middlesex Counties are hoping to bring attention to use the moment to recruit more “big siblings,” especially men, to make a positive difference in a young person’s life.“Everyone has had a mentor in life,” said Marybeth Bull, a resident of Fair Haven who is also director of development at Big Brothers Big Sisters of Monmouth & Middlesex Counties (BBBS). “Whether it was a family member, or a boss, somebody in their life who has been there for them and showed them the way and been a positive person in their life.”You don’t need special skills. “You just have to be willing to share time with a child that needs a positive person in their life,” Bull said.Adults 19 years or older who can commit to spend four to six hours a month for at least a year, are great candidates for the volunteer position, she said.“To be a friend, spend time, be an ear for them, be a shoulder for them,” she said. “To point them in the right direction.”Headquartered in Asbury Park, BBBS currently serves 700 children in its program across Monmouth and Middlesex counties.“Littles” – who range in age from 6 to 15 years old – usually join the program at school and may be referred by guidance counselors and other social organizations. They are often from single parent households. The BBBS typically provides girls with a female mentor and boys with a male mentor. Bull said a woman can be a Big Sister to a young boy in certain circumstances, because there are many more female mentors than males. The program has an acute need for men to volunteer as Big Brothers for the large number of boys on the waiting list.Mentors undergo in-depth interviews. Screened applicants are matched with Littles based on similar interests, hobbies, and personal traits. “We’re not going to match a kid who wants to go to the library with someone who wants to play basketball,” Bull said.Although some duos may not immediately hit it off, Bull said matches are usually successful. “We have a wonderful length of our matches,” she said. “An average of 3 ½ years more than the national averages. And a lot of people stay in touch for a lifetime.”Training and case managers who check in regularly and monthly group activities with other Bigs and Littles, help a new mentor break the ice. “We let them know they’re not alone,” said Bull.Bull said the program stresses the duo should participate in low cost, simple activities, such as a trip to the park or shooting hoops. “It’s about building a friendship,” she said. “The child needs special one-to-one attention.”In addition to the traditional community-based programs, BBBS has other programs including one at Monmouth University that pairs college student mentors with Asbury Park high school students, similar to a peer-to-peer mentoring relationship.Bull finds many of the Littles in the program never thought about college but after meeting with the college students and touring the university, they “start to really see themselves in that environment.”She cites a Little Brother who not only went on to attend Monmouth University, but is now a Big Brother in the program.In addition, a program focused on a workplace environment, like Monmouth Medical Center and New Jersey Natural Gas, matches employees at all levels – from IT techs to senior vice presidents – with Littles.“The kids get a sense of a lot of different opportunities,” Bull said.Mentoring allows volunteers a chance to “see life through a child’s eyes again,” said Bull, who has been with BBBS for 15 years. “I’ve gotten to see how it makes such a difference in an impressionable child. How this person can impart their wisdom and help with everything from homework to life skills. D.J. and his Big Brother Justin Brown celebrate D.J.’s induction to the National Honor Society last year. Photo: BBBS“From Day One, it felt so natural, the first time we hung out,” said Justin Brown, 35, who became a Big Brother to D.J. in 2010. “He has such a wide-open personality.” (At the BBBS request, D.J.’s last name is being withheld to protect his privacy.)As a teacher, previously at Lakewood High School and now at Neptune High School, Brown said he sees a lot of kids “missing that strong role model.”In those early days, when D.J. was in 7th grade, he and Brown would go for pizza or take a trip to the beach.D.J. was an active Boy Scout – he is now working on his Eagle Scout project – so they found a common interest in the outdoors. “We did a lot of outdoor stuff – hiking, kayaking,” said Brown, who was also a Boy Scout. “It was all the things I like to do.”“D.J. comes from a good family,” Brown said, and credits D.J.’s grandmother for being very involved in his life. With an older sister who went to college, it was always expected that D.J. would go on for a degree. “His grandmother was pushing him not to let outside forces take him down the wrong road.”As a Big Brother, Brown said, “I think I gave him a big-picture perspective.”“It’s been just a good feeling, just to be there, to see him grow so much,” said Brown. “It’s been a positive influence in my life, too.“As a teacher you develop bonds with students, but with D.J., I really feel he’s part of my family.“He’s just my little brother,” said Brown, “he’s been part of my life.”So much so that two years ago D.J. served as a groomsman in Brown’s wedding.“D.J. will be part of my life forever.”For D.J., who will turn 18 soon, much of his high school senior year has been spent getting ready for college. He has already been accepted to a host of schools, including NJIT, University of Delaware, Drexel University, SUNY Alfred and Monmouth University, and is waiting on decisions from a few more. He plans to study medical engineering.Both men agree college was always in D.J.’s plans.“My grades were spot on – A’s and B’s,” D.J. said. “It was the internal stuff” that he feels he needed from his Big Brother.“I live in a family full of girls,” said D.J. “I have 10 half sisters.”Over the years, D.J. consulted with Brown about everything from homework and colleges to social pressures and girls.“He’s got the girl thing covered,” D.J. said.As mentors go, D.J. thinks his match was perfect. “We share nearly everything in common. He likes everything I love to do,” said D.J. “He’s actually a brother to me.”And now D.J. looks forward to his new role: as “big brother” to Brown’s 5-month old son River. So too will be a special person in his life – his “Big Brother” Justin Brown, a 35- year-old high school teacher who volunteers his time through Big Brothers Big Sisters. By Judy O’Gorman AlvarezWhen high school senior D.J. accepts his diploma at Long Branch High School graduation this June, his family will be proudly watching. “If you think about one child at a time,” she said, and then “if you look at the big picture, it changes lives for generations.”last_img read more

‘A good day for insurance policy holders’ – Doherty welcomes passage of bill

first_imgPearse Doherty TD has welcomed the passage of Sinn Féin’s Consumer Insurance Contracts Bill through the Dáil.This legislation, which would reform insurance contracts, passed Report and Final Stages in the Dáil on Wednesday.“This is a good day for insurance policyholders, for consumers and businesses,” Deputy Doherty said yesterday. “Rip-off insurance costs are squeezing incomes and closing down businesses across the State. People are wondering how their premiums can go up every year even though they haven’t even made a claim.”He explained: “Our Consumer Insurance Contracts Bill, which passed Report and Final Stages of the Dáil today, will tilt the balance in favour of the consumer. By increasing transparency and strengthening the hand of the policyholder before, during and after the terms of their insurance contract.“This Bill will require companies to inform the customer of the past 3 years of premiums paid and claims received for all non-life insurance contracts. This would increase transparency and strengthen our hands when we look for a better deal each year.“Any company that cancels a policy would have to pay the customer the outstanding balance of the premium paid and make it easier for the customer to withdraw from a contract. “It would also require a company to inform customers of any claim made against their policy, allowing them to submit their own evidence and informing them of the cost of any claim against their policy that has been settled.“The legislation would also make it harder for an insurer to wriggle out of paying valid claims on grounds that have nothing to do with the accident or loss incurred by the policyholder.“In short, this would bring huge benefits to policyholders.”The legislation will now go the Seanad and Deputy Doherty expects it to become law before the end of the year.“Sinn Féin want to take on the insurance industry and ending the rip-off. By stamping out fraud, protecting consumers, banning dual pricing and bringing down premiums. The passage of this Bill today is a part of that work.” ‘A good day for insurance policy holders’ – Doherty welcomes passage of bill was last modified: November 14th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Depending on Source, Stem Cells Can Kill or Heal

first_img(Visited 10 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Stem cells continue to show promise for dramatic healings, but reporters don’t always clarify what lived or died to produce the cells.  Adult stem cells inhabit all living humans; embryonic or fetal stem cells require a human death.Adult Stem Cell NewsCord blood awakens boy:  Parents of a boy with pediatric cerebral palsy are glad they froze samples of his cord blood when he was born. At age 2-1/2, he had a cardiac arrest with severe brain damage that left him in a persistent vegetative state. Now, Science Daily reported, after the first successful treatment with stem cells from his autologous cord blood, the boy has awakened. He can move and speak simple sentences.Mesenchymal stem cells and ALS:  It’s an odd reversal of ethics to put human stem cells in rats, but Medical Xpress reported progress against amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) by injecting engineered human mesenchymal stem cells into the furry rodents, causing them to produce growth factors that delay onset of the disease.  The article pointed to a benefit of adult stem cells: “By using adult mesenchymal stem cells, the technique avoided the danger of tumor that can arise with the transplant of embryonic stem cells and related ‘do-anything’ cells.”Blood stem cells and cancer:  Science Daily reported on significant improvements in survival for cancer patients with lymphomas, leukemias and other blood cancers, thanks to adult blood stem cells from donors and the patients themselves.  “The significant improvements we saw across all patient and disease populations should offer patients hope and, among physicians, reinforce the role of blood stem cell transplants as a curative option for life-threatening blood cancers and other diseases.”Embryonic and Fetal Stem Cell NewshESC and blindness:  New Scientist reported a rare success with human embryonic stem cells.  Implanted into the retina, a man with a form of macular degeneration went from 20/400 (legally blind) to 20/40 (sighted) over time.  Results have not yet been published.Fetal stem cells and stroke:  New Scientist reported modest improvement in stroke victims injected with stem cells in a new clinical trial.  The article only mentioned where the cells came from in passing.  The researcher “thinks that the fetal neural stem cells injected into the volunteers’ brains may stifle inflammation and catalyse the formation of new blood supplies to stroke-damaged tissue.”Cloner trouble:  The embryonic stem cell success at University of Oregon (see 5/17/13) has come under fire for two things: a rush to publication, and sloppy errors.  New Scientist and Nature reported the controversy.  So far, it appears none of the errors affected the experimental results.  Mitalipov admitted the mistakes but defends his work.How This Translates to PolicyProtecting the right to kill:  In the wake of the Mitalipov success, Nature‘s editors urged the journal’s scientific members to take ownership of the stem cell debate, lest public fears stifle progress.  The editors acknowledged, “It is true that the research faces ethical controversy on three fronts: egg donation, embryo destruction and cloning.”  They also acknowledged that induced pluripotent stem cells appear so far to work just as well as hESC without the ethical problems: “crucially they do not require egg recruitment, embryo destruction or cloning.”  Yet the editors seemed more concerned about preventing a public outcry against the destruction of human embryos.  Without proof, they said, “Whatever the outcome of those investigations, there are some clinical applications for which cloned stem cells could be the best option.”  The prior week, though, Nature editors urged scientists to accept more social responsibility for risky new technologies.Why stop at embryos?  In an article entitled “Alzheimer’s disease, the soft target of the euthanasia debate,” Medical Xpress aired the views of Megan-Jane Johnstone (Deakin University) about euthanasia.  Johnstone sees a softening of public attitudes about euthanasia with so many elderly declining into dementia.  “The proposal to allow euthanasia as a morally warranted option in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias is neither simple nor straightforward,” she said. “Anything less than an honest, transparent and accountable debate, which has been lacking to date, would be an assault on the integrity of all—both those for and against the euthanasia proposal—who are trying in their own ways to care for those who are confronting the hard-nosed reality of their inevitable mortality.”Why stop at euthanasia?  New Scientist provoked controversy with this eye-catching headline: “Is extinction really such a bad thing?”  Consultant Shaoni Bhattacharya was not proposing it for humans or anything like that; she was just commenting on a new exhibit on extinction at London’s Natural History Museum.     “A thoughtful exhibition at London’s Natural History Museum explores the benefits of extinction, and the possibility of humanity eradicating itself.”  The world view is both Darwinian and Malthusian:Survival is tough, and in a masterful stroke, the exhibition drives this home with a retro video game. In the species extinction game, the player must manoeuvre a Pac-Man-like creature around a world beset with creeping ice ages, fiery volcanoes and relentless winds, all the while competing with other animated species to snaffle sparse food supplies. A genius touch is the availability of “adaptation” tokens, which allow your creature to evolve traits to help it survive longer in its hostile world.The museum portrays extinction as a part of life.  “Extinction isn’t necessarily the end of the world, it could be just the beginning…,” one sign reads.  “In a thought-provoking section, the museum presents the concept of Homo extinctus – humans wiped out forever.”  Sweet dreams.The choice is clear.  Evolution is pro-death, creation is pro-life.  Evolution sees death as a good thing; creation sees it as a curse.  Evolution says “what’s the big deal?”; creation says humans, made in the image of God, are more precious than animals. Evolution sees millions of years of senseless struggle against elements just for the reward of passing on one’s genes in an endless cycle of meaninglessness that ends in a charred, dead world.  Creation sees death as an intruder, an enemy, that will be conquered in the new heavens and new earth, and has been conquered for those who accept Christ’s death and resurrection on their behalf.  Choose you this day.The sanctity of human life is the dividing issue for stem cell research, abortion and euthanasia.  It’s easy to see why evolutionists are so dismissive of the ethical qualms “religious people” worry about.  They only see cells and fetuses as clumps of matter, when in fact, a human embryo, even from the single-celled zygote, contains the entire genetic program for an adult human being.Evolutionists tend to be pragmatists.  If people are having abortions anyway, why not grab some of the stem cells?  (They fail to see how this legitimizes abortion and creates a market for it.)  If women are producing eggs anyway, why not harvest them?  (They fail to take seriously the potential abuses to women.)  If human blastocysts can’t produce adult clones (yet), why not harvest their stem cells?  If old people can’t communicate any more, why not help them die?  If everything competes for resources, why not let humans go extinct?  If humans are wrecking the planet, why not drastically cut their numbers? OK, evolutionist, set the example – you first.The New Scientist article on extinction shows that some evolutionists still think Malthus had the right idea: competition for scarce resources guarantees lots of death.  That notion that spurred Darwin to use the “struggle for existence” as a driver for natural selection has been debunked (7/02/09, 12/09/09 #3, 9/18/10) but it keeps returning.  In actuality, freedom lets human society blossom, but tyranny destroys it.  Need proof?  The 20th century.Evolutionists would not want to live in the world their world view is leading toward.  Those who love Christ need to keep the leaven of his teachings spreading through a lost world.  Keep the salt in the decaying meat.  Keep the light shining in the darkness.  All that is required for a brave new world to embrace death is for godly people to do nothing.  “I call heaven and earth as witnesses today against you, that I have set before you life and death, blessing and cursing; therefore choose life, that both you and your descendants may live” (Deuteronomy 30:19).last_img read more

Ambohot returns for Letran but still groping for form

first_imgLOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Go: Search for ‘perfect, honest man’ to lead PNP still on PLAY LIST 01:31Go: Search for ‘perfect, honest man’ to lead PNP still on00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics02:16Duque: It’s up to Palace to decide on Dengvaxia’s fate01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games MOST READ Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH “It’s a reason why I committed those miscues, because I’m so excited to play. But when I returned in the third quarter, I followed coach’s words and calmed myself and eventually, I got my confidence back and the shots got falling,” he said.Napa, though, is willing to treat Ambohot with kid gloves as he expects to have him in his peak form soon.“We’re not rushing him. We know that he’s a warrior. Even if he’s injured, he will play. Coming to the next game, maybe he’ll be 100-percent,” he said.For his part, Ambohot has faith in himself that he’ll be better for Letran’s all-important duel against San Beda next Friday.“I’ll do everything I can, I’ll do my best on what I have to do to be 100-percent. Coach told me that I should get my game back and I need to have my confidence again so that’s what I will do this coming week,” he said.ADVERTISEMENT Jeo Ambohot. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netJeo Ambohot is just glad to be back on the hardcourt for Letran.Playing for the first time since fracturing his right wrist on August 15 in Letran’s game against San Sebastian, the 6-foot-6 center’s entry was a welcome boost for the Knights as they continue their Final Four hunt. ADVERTISEMENT For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City “I’m so excited to play again,” said Ambohot, who gathered eight points, on a 2-of-3 shooting from three, three rebounds, three blocks, and a steal in his 18 minutes on the floor in his return. However, Letran failed to dent Lyceum’s armor and lost, 81-69, to drop to an even 8-8 card.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutCoach Jeff Napa said that it was evident that Ambohot still lacks the timing after a seven-week layoff “because he tires quickly.”That lack of rhythm showed when Ambohot committed three turnovers in the second quarter, something the sophomore big man attributed to his eagerness to get a piece of the action anew. Read Next Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president Ginebra nears finals, nips TNT in game 3 Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight LATEST STORIES View commentslast_img read more

Hit India hard from ball one: South African coach Fletcher to his boys

first_imgWary of an Indian backlash after their humiliating loss in the series opener, South African batting coach Duncan Fletcher on Friday asked his players to hit visiting team “hard” from ball one in tomorrow’s second cricket one-dayer here.South Africa had crushed India by a huge margin of 135 runs in the first one-dayer at Durban on Wednesday.But going by India’s performance in the tour so far, South Africa cannot afford to relax as Mahendra Singh Dhoni and company have made a strong comeback in the three-match Test series, drawing it after losing the first Test by an innings.”Just got to be very wary that this happened in the Test series. But I don’t think it will. There seems to be a very good attitude amongst this one-day squad. They seem to have learnt their lesson. It’s just important that they go in there and hit India hard from ball one again,” Fletcher told media on the eve of the second ODI of the five-match series.”And make sure they don’t get complacent. India are quite an experienced side. Although they’ve got young players, if but they are pretty experienced. You got to be wary this fact.They know how to play out of these situations. South Africa have to be careful,” added the former England coach.Fletcher, however, is not happy with the home team’s handling of the Power-plays.”I’ve always believed they haven’t really believed when they have taken it. If sides or captains want, there are a lot of possibilities on how to take them.advertisement”It’s just been a misinterpretation as how you play within the Power Play. Sometimes you’ve got to look at it as there are other advantages of taking it at a certain time,” he said.Talking about the changing face of the game in the wake of Twenty20 cricket, Fletcher said: “It (T20) had an influence right through cricket. The players are going to be more attacking, but 50 overs is a lot of cricket.”If sides think they can go out there and adopt a Twenty20 attitude from ball one, sure on a given day they might be successful, but not over a period of time. They got to be very wary that in 50 overs there will be periods when you have to be more patient.” .Fletcher also said that international teams should have the ability to adjust to different conditions and playing surfaces and was satisfied with the Proteas team on this front.”I believe South Africa matches everyone as far as one-day cricket is concerned. They haven’t been fooled by the wicket they bowled on. They won’t bowl on that wicket very often, but when they get on it they play very very well.”When they go to India the wickets may be a bit slower and a bit flatter, but they just have to get used to it. They have to adapt a bit quicker. Bowlers at the international level have got to do that. They’ve got the skill and the ability to do that,” he said.Fletcher made no bones about the fact that South Africa was missing Jacques Kallis but said the upcoming all-rounders are really bright.”Obviously they’re going to have a problem with the all-rounder. South Africa always had plenty of all-rounders which has given them depth. They’ve got into the area that without Jacques Kallis they might need a bit of depth but the backup batters are good enough. All it needs a little bit more experience I guess,” he said without taking any names.last_img read more

10 Marketing Stories You Need To Know Tonight

first_img10 Marketing Stories to Keep You in the Know – The folks at Search Engine Land have done an interesting experiment showing that Bing actually delivers better quality search results than Google.  Photo Credit: 1. Topics: 7. 26 Tips to Enhance Your Experience on LinkedIn  – Check out this article from Mashable to learn how the Web might look different in the future. Pioneers from the early days of the Web share their insights on the next big things to happen online. Originally published Jan 12, 2011 8:00:00 PM, updated March 21 2013 – Want to get better at using LinkedIn? Social Media Examiner has a new post that provides tips and tricks to make you a LinkedIn ninja. – In one of his newest posts, Seth Godin minds marketers of the crowded digital world in which we all live. What do all of these digital interruptions mean for us? 3. – How much should you spend on SEO? Lee Odden over at the Top Rank Blog breaks down how to think about investing in SEO. – Anchor text is one of those SEO terms that always gets mentioned. Search Engine Watch examines if link relevance can be just as important for SEO. 6 Web Pioneers on What the Internet Will Look Like in the Future Investing vs. Wasting Budget on SEO 6. 4. – Think social games aren’t big business? Think again. Techcrunch reports that social gaming will be a $1 billion business in 2011. 5.center_img Survey Says: Mobile Purchase Behavior Is on the Rise Lost in a Digital World What other stories from the past few days would you add to this list? – According to a new study, Marketing Pilgrim reports, 33 percent of consumers used their cell phone for shopping during the 2010 holiday season. This is an all-time high. 8. Social Gaming to Be A $1B Market in 2011; Virtual Goods to Bring in $653M – If you are looking for a branding fix, the folks over at Logo Design Love offer a new branding book that will make marketers’ hearts skip a beat. 9. 10. 38 Critical Books Every Blogger 
Needs to Read 2. Google vs. Bing: The Fallacy Of The Superior Search Engine – Not that you don’t already have enough to do, but the folks over at Copy Blogger have put together a list of 38 books ever blogger should read. Go warm up your book light. christopher.woo Is Link Relevance as Effective as Anchor Text? Inbound Marketing How Do You Brand Bad News? Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more