Don’t just install tech, integrate it

first_img 48SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Tim Klatt As the Director of Retail Strategies for La Macchia Group, Tim Klatt brings over 15 years of experience in geographical market analysis, strategy development and large scale retail deployments for … Web: www.lamacchiagroup.com Details Credit unions are rooted in community and thrive on highly personal, relationship-driven service. These attributes are – and should remain – the core of a credit union’s mission. That increasingly means enabling technology with a purpose: creating high-touch, personalized relationships through smart technology integrations.According to Deloitte, today’s consumers expect their financial institutions to act and interact more like top technology brands. In an age where credit unions need to do all they can to avoid being “Rocket Mortgaged,” and consumers seek a fast, frictionless financial experience across various mediums, technology integration must be a top priority for credit unions of all sizes.If you’re not thinking about technology, you’re in the minority. In 2018, 78% of financial executives believed their work was going to change in the next five years because of new digital business trends. But investing in technology for your credit union is about more than “keeping up with the Joneses.” It is not simply installing screens blandly showcasing your most recent auto loan rate, or CD or using ITMs in your branches. To achieve the maximum return on investment, technology must serve a purpose. It must be integrated into your member’s journey, identifying, addressing and easing friction points for your members and acting as a seamless expression of your brand.So, what is the right kind of technology to focus on? There is no cookie-cutter, one-size-fits-all approach to technology integration for credit unions. It’s important to leverage community and demographic insights to determine what your members care about and use available technology to help you connect with them. How do you know when it’s time to consider an update? If you’ve found yourself or your team saying any of the following, it’s time:“My branch feels out-of-date and out-of-touch.”Technology integration enables you to create a customized, personalized environment that is adaptable, modern and experiential. It is not about digital display, it’s about digital engagement. Taking your brand digital means you can quickly and creatively deploy custom content that instantly rejuvenates your brand and your message. Where in the past, you invested in static signage and it was “one and done,” a one-time investment in technology integration unlocks a plethora of opportunities to engage with members through meaningful, timely and relevant content.“I don’t know what my members want and need.”No one expects you to be a mind-reader. A critical first step of technology integration is to conduct demographic and member research to discover what, if any, points of friction currently exist within a member’s user financial experience. We then determine how best to leverage technology to address those issues. This is not a guessing game; it’s rooted in data and actionable insights and should clearly demonstrate a return on investment.“I need to do more with less.”How members use branches is changing. As branches become a key place for conversation and consultation, technology can supplement existing staff to ensure that while your employees are guiding individuals and families through some of life’s bigger moments like mortgages and loans, your members can still quickly and efficiently carry out their day-to-day transactional needs in a way that provides a user-focused, individualized experience.The topic of technology is hot right now – in just about every industry. But it must be more than a “hot topic” – it must be an intentional, purpose-driven business investment. The ROI is clear. True technology integration will drive business growth, profitability and member engagement, and set your credit union up to evolve alongside its members.last_img read more

Now retired, Bolt excited about the next chapter

first_imgIT was not the fastest 400m of Usain Bolt’s career (his lifetime best will go down in history as 45.28, dating back to 2007) but it was a landmark circuit for the Jamaican who has illuminated track and field these past nine years with his superhuman talent and his stellar personality.Twenty-four hours after his final race ended in the anguish of a torn hamstring on the anchor leg of the 4x100m, the Jamaican phenomenon was back on the track in the London Stadium, soaking up the adoration on a fitting farewell lap of honour at the end of the final session at the IAAF World Championships London 2017.Before setting off at walking pace, the Lightning Bolt was presented with a framed piece of lane seven of the original track in the same arena, in which he won the second of his three Olympic 100m titles (in a Games record of 9.63) and 200m titles (in 19.32) in 2012, by IAAF president Sebastian Coe and London Mayor Sadiq Khan.The trackside clock flashed up the world record times Bolt set at the 2009 IAAF World Championships in Berlin, 9.58 and 19.19, and he halted both at the 200m start and 100m start for a moment’s contemplation.“I was saying goodbye to the fans and I was saying goodbye to my events also,” said the 30-year-old, whose bronze in the 100m final on day two took his men’s record World Championships medal haul to 14.“I was just saying goodbye to everything. I think I almost cried. It was close, but it didn’t come.”Asked about the reaction from the sell-out London crowd, Bolt enthused: “It was brilliant. The support has not changed. I expected it.“It’s really sad that I have to walk away now but the energy of the crowd is great. The fans really love me and I appreciate that.“I have no regrets about running this year. The fans asked me. They wanted to see me one more year.“I wanted to do it for my fans. Without them, I wouldn’t have done what I’ve done. They gave me the energy.“I don’t think one championship is going to change what I’ve done. I remember after losing the 100m final, someone said, ‘Don’t worry. Muhammad Ali lost his last fight’.“I’ve proved myself year in, year out. I think the fact that I didn’t win my last race doesn’t affect what I’ve done in the sport.”Bolt started his career hampered by injury and, sadly, has finished with an injury too. “I had treatment last night and treatment today,” he said, “and I’ll have it treated until I get an MRI scan to see if it’s as bad as I think it is. After pulling my hamstring, I’m worried about it.“I just came out and did my best. It didn’t play out to the book but everything happens for a reason. I don’t know why. It’s just championships.”As for the future, Bolt said: “The first thing I’m going to do is go out and have some fun – just to party. I need to go out and have a drink. I’ve had a stressful championships.”And, beyond that, might there be a change of heart and a return to the track? “No,” said Bolt, emphatically. “I think I’ve seen too many people return and come back into the sport and shame themselves. I won’t be one of those persons.“I would like to stay involved in athletics but I’m not sure what specifically I’ll be doing. My agent is talking to Mr Coe to figure out in what way I can help out the sport.“I’m excited about it. Track and field gave me everything I have.” (Sportsmax.com)last_img read more