St. Edmunds Episcopal Church: A Video: The Power of Words!

first_img faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Faith Essays & Inspirations St. Edmunds Episcopal Church: A Video: The Power of Words! Published on Thursday, May 3, 2012 | 4:05 pm Subscribe Business News Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Make a comment Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena More Cool Stuff HerbeautyThese Lipsticks Are Designed To Make Your Teeth Appear Whiter!HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyYou Can’t Go Past Our Healthy Quick RecipesHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyCostume That Makes Actresses Beneath Practically UnrecognizableHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyStop Eating Read Meat (Before It’s Too Late)HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Most Influential Women In HistoryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty8 Easy Exotic Meals Anyone Can MakeHerbeautyHerbeauty Community Newscenter_img First Heatwave Expected Next Week EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Nice and inspiring words. This clip was embedded at the website of St. Edmunds Episcopal Church and the church hopes that it would instill hope amongst men.“Colors fade, temples crumble, empires fall, but wise words endure.”– Edward ThorndikeSt. Edmunds Episcopal Church, 1175 San Gabriel Boulevard, San Marino, (626) 793-9167 or visit www.saintedmunds.org. Community News 7 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Top of the News Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website last_img read more

‘Lime Sizzler’

first_imgYou can spot ‘Lime Sizzler’ firebush in a landscape from a mile away! Well, that may be a slight exaggeration, but the new ‘Lime Sizzler’ definitely grabs attention. Ever since firebush was declared a Texas Superstar winner 20 years ago, it has captured the fancy of gardeners, hummingbirds, butterflies and bees. Now with the addition of ‘Lime Sizzler,’ gardeners have gone gaga.Botanically speaking, ‘Lime Sizzler’ is known as Hamelia patens and is native everywhere from South Florida to the West Indies, Mexico and Central America. It was actually discovered at a nursery in South Texas, and the plant was then patented. It is so exotic and showy that it seems that the entire green industry wants it in its product line, including the Southern Living Plant Collection.The shocking green and yellow foliage would probably be enough to make gardeners desire the plant, but add the trumpet-shaped, red-orange flower so loved by pollinators, and it’s really more than a plant geek like me can stand. I’ll be honest, though — I have never met a firebush I didn’t like.’Lime Sizzler’ is more compact, in the 4-by-4-foot range. Across most of the country, it will be grown as an annual and, truthfully, it’s a most worthy value for your gardening dollar. The firebush, which is also called “hummingbird bush” and “scarlet bush,” is related to coffee, gardenia and the colorful ixora. Technically, it is a zones-9-to-11 plant, but will return most years in zone 8. Here in Savannah and the low country, it is a trooper. In the University of Georgia Coastal Botanical Gardens, ours are 4 to 6 feet and, indeed, have attained that shrubby look, even after dying to the ground. Our ‘Lime Sizzlers’ were planted late this spring from 1-gallon containers and are now 2 feet by 2 feet. Even at this size, I can spot them across the garden.In addition to the ‘Lime Sizzler,’ we grow the typical green form and several plants of the ‘Firefly’ variety. ‘Firefly’ firebush has smaller leaves and more yellow showing in the blossoms. We also grow the ‘Bahama’ firebush, Hamelia cuprea, that has glossy leaves and much larger flowers, almost reminiscent of an esperanza or tecoma, but more bell shaped.When the torrid temperatures of August arrive, many gardeners look for plants that are as tough as nails when it comes to heat and drought conditions. I am happy to say that the firebush fits the bill. Once established, it is very heat and drought tolerant and will grow in almost any well-drained soil.Even now you could consider planting two or three for a nice show. We are planting ‘Lime Sizzler’ in the cottage garden with the iridescent ‘Purple Flash’ ornamental pepper. Even though they are heat and drought tolerant, apply a good layer of mulch after planting. At the gardens, we also use the other firebush varieties in our Mediterranean garden, where we have them combined with the purple-on-purple Mexican bush sage, European fan palms and giant blue agave. You will find ‘Lime Sizzler’ so colorful that you may eventually want to try some in containers around the porch, patio or pool. I hope you will give not only ‘Lime Sizzler,’ but all firebush a try.Follow me on Twitter @CGBGgardenguru. For more information about the Coastal Botanical Gardens, go to www.coastalgeorgiabg.org/.last_img read more

Your credit card is changing: What you need to know

first_imgDid you get a replacement credit card in the mail recently? Are you confused as to why?You’re in good company. The U.S. is adopting a significant change in how credit card payments are processed in stores, which will have consumers inserting cards equipped with a special chip rather than swiping at the checkout counter, but many people are still in the dark.Nearly 3 in 5 of the 1,000 consumers surveyed by payments solutions company ACI Worldwide have not yet received a chipped card. Among those who already have their new card, only 32 percent said they understand the U.S. is moving to a new card processing system.To get up to speed, here are seven things you need to know about the transition to chipped technology.The U.S. is the last major country to transition its cards. The U.K. was the first to adopt the new payment system, known as the EMV standard. Developed by and named for Europay, MasterCard and Visa, EMV requires cards be outfitted with a chip that transmits a unique code for each transaction. The technology dramatically reduces the ability of thieves to use stolen credit card numbers in stores. continue reading » 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

China approves its first H5N1 vaccine

first_imgApr 3, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – China’s State Food and Drug Administration (SFDA) yesterday approved the country’s first prepandemic H5N1 influenza vaccine, an inactivated whole-virus product made by Sinovac, a Beijing-based biotechnology company.China’s approval of Sinovac’s Panflu vaccine marks the third H5N1 vaccine to win approval from national or international regulatory bodies. In April 2007, the US Food and Drug Administration approved a Sanofi Pasteur H5N1 vaccine. A month later, the European Union approved a mock-up pandemic flu vaccine made by Novartis (it is designed to speed vaccine production when a pandemic emerges and will not be manufactured until then).Sinovac said its vaccine is approved only to supply China’s national vaccine stockpile and will not be available for commercial sale, according to a company press release yesterday. In 2006 the company said it planned to produce 20 million doses of the vaccine over the next few years, according to a previous report. The latest information gave no production estimate.”This vaccine is reserved for emergencies in the country and we have to get instructions on how much to produce,” Liu Peicheng, Sinovac’s publicity supervisor, told Reuters today.Vaccine experts say there is no guarantee that vaccines based on current H5N1 strains will be effective if a pandemic H5N1 virus emerges, but they hope such vaccines will provide some protection and buy time while a vaccine specifically matched to the pandemic strain is developed.The Sinovac vaccine contains an inactivated Vietnam strain of H5N1 virus and an aluminum hydroxide (alum) adjuvant. A phase 1 study of the vaccine, published in a 2006 issue of The Lancet, induced potentially protective immune responses in 78% of volunteers after two 10-microgram (mcg) doses.In late December 2007, Sinovac in a press release reported preliminary phase 2 results for the vaccine. The trial included 402 adults (aged 18 to 60). Groups received two doses of 5, 10, or 15 mcg of the vaccine.Each dosage induced varying degrees of immune response, but the 10- and 15-mcg dosages reached standards set by the EMEA to indicate good results for seasonal flu vaccines. Sinovac said the trial did not show any serious adverse reactions among the volunteers.The researchers who conducted the phase 1 trial said a whole-virus vaccine offers a dose-sparing advantage, because 20% to 23% of the vaccine antigen is lost during the preparation of split-virus vaccines. However, Iain Stephenson, MD, of the Infectious Disease Unit at Leicester Royal Infirmary in Leicester, England, had said in a Lancet editorial that though whole-virus vaccines usually produce a better response than split or subunit counterparts, it is difficult for manufacturers to switch production methods. Also, he said whole-virus vaccines are linked to febrile reactions in children.Sinovac has also completed a phase 1 trial of a split-virus H5N1 vaccine, which was found to be safe for children, adults, and elderly people, according to its December 2007 press release.Peicheng said Sinovac is also conducting trials to see if its H5N1 vaccine yields cross-protection against other strains, including those from Indonesia, Turkey, and Anhui province in China, Reuters reported.China has reported three H5N1 cases so far this year, all of them fatal.Vietnam starts H5N1 vaccine trialIn other vaccine developments, Vietnamese researchers said today that clinical trials have begun for an H5N1 vaccine that the country is developing, according to a report from Reuters. The vaccine is based on a Vietnam strain of H5N1 virus.The vaccine is being tested in 11 volunteers, all of whom are researchers, the report said. They received their second dose of the vaccine today at the National Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology in Hanoi.Nguyen Tuyet Nga, an epidemiologist and virologist who is leading the trial, told Reuters that the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) have helped with the project, though no foreign pharmaceutical firms are involved in the study.Subjects in the trial are receiving two injections 28 days apart, with doses ranging from 3.75 to 45 mcg, Nga said. She also told Reuters that researchers would test the vaccine at a later date to see if it offers cross-protection against other H5N1 strains. The report did not say if the Vietnamese vaccine is a split- or whole-virus product or if it contains an adjuvant.Vietnam has reported five H5N1 cases this year, all of them fatal.See also:Sep 7, 2006, CIDRAP News story “Chinese report results for whole-virus H5N1 vaccine”Apr 2 Sinovac press releasehttp://www.sinovac.com/?optionid=754&auto_id=569Dec 24, 2007, Sinovac press releasehttp://www.sinovac.com/?optionid=754&auto_id=496Oct25 to Nov 2, 2007, CIDRAP News report “The pandemic vaccine puzzle: A seven-part series on the chances for immunizing the world against pandemic flu”last_img read more