Bonnaroo Wants To Expand To Four Annual Events

first_imgDuring a speech in front of the Manchester Chamber of Commerce, AC Entertainment‘s vice president for community relations Jeff Cuellar discussed the property that Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival has been held on since its inception being used as a multi-purpose festival and special events site, with multiple events being held on the property each year.While Cuellar’s speech received an initial positive reaction with a standing ovation, there will be several major hurdles that need to be faced before this idea can come to fruition. While the Great Stage Farm has received million of dollars in infrastructure upgrades, there is still more work to be done, particularly in the area of water and sewage.Pearl Jam Brings Neil Young, Pink Floyd Covers To Bonnaroo Headlining SetAccording to The Tennessean, when looking at the current deal between the festival and the city, “Bonnaroo pays a flat $30,000 payment each year in addition to $3 on each ticket sold, which has pumped around $280,000 annually into Coffee County’s coffers. Bonnaroo also covers the cost of overtime pay for Coffee County and Manchester law enforcement and public safety officers.” Bonnaroo officials and controlling partner Live Nation will seek to have the structure of that deal changed moving forward, so some of that money goes towards future upgrades.Cuellar went on to say, ““Our grand vision for Great Stage Park is not yet complete, and there is still plenty of work to do to the site in order to create the kind of infrastructure overhaul to allow for a diversity of events to take place on the site….That’s right — Bonnaroo is just one of a series of annual events that we’d like to host at Great  Stage Park. It is not unreasonable to think that we could be hosting two, three, four events (at the Bonnaroo site) annually by 2020.”A study of the 2012 event showed that the festival generated $51 million in economic impact and $36 million in direct spending for the local Coffee County areas, especially Manchester, which boasts a year-round population of 10,000. And with more events, that brings in more tax dollars and spending for the community. We’ll see how this all pans out in the end.[via The Tennessean]last_img read more

House Of Yes To Host Benefit Concert For Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund

first_imgWith the absolute devastation and destruction left in Hurricane Harvey‘s path last week in Houston, TX and the surrounding areas, it has become all the more evident that people are in dire need of help. The House of Yes, in conjunction with Good Looks Collective, will host FVCK HARVEY: A Concert to Benefit the Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund tomorrow afternoon in Brooklyn, New York from 2PM-8PM (buy tickets here).Proceeds will go to Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund to support those in need, anyway necessary. Headlined by two-time Grammy winning producers Brasstracks and the funk bringing Jenaux, NYC will come together to dance in support of those in need. An entire lineup of NY natives including lo-fi hip-hop producer Birocratic, a groovy Gibbz on guitar, beautiful keys from Josh Jacobson, and shlomo type producer Yury to round out your afternoon. More information can be found here.last_img read more

Guardians of the sky

first_imgIt was 16 degrees on a January night, the cold made worse by the fatigue of working so many hours. Box after box, heavy with glass, had to pass through the basement window, into the snow-covered parking lot.But if the cold made for deep discomfort — and chattering teeth — it also proved a disaster-recovery ally after a water-main break flooded the Harvard College Observatory’s Plate Stacks, a unique historical treasure holding hundreds of thousands of glass plate negatives that serve as a record of skies around the world across more than a century.By the time the flooding was discovered, early on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, the lowest level of the three-story stacks had been flooded to three feet, immersing 61,000 of the negatives and derailing the Digital Access to a Sky Century at Harvard (DASCH) project, a decade-long scanning effort aimed at making the plates more accessible for study.The flood also soaked the custom-built digital scanner at the heart of the project. But the plates themselves were the main concern. With those in good repair, everything else would be OK.“This collection is unparalleled, in my opinion,” said Brenda Bernier, who is the James Needham Chief Conservator and head of Harvard Library’s Weissman Preservation Center and Collections Care. “It’s the depth and breadth of the data, it’s extraordinary. The scale — hundreds of thousands of one of the most vulnerable formats.”Prof. Josh Grindlay at the Center for Astrophysics with Lindsay Smith, assistant curator of the Harvard Astronomical Plate Collection and head of the DASCH project scanning staff. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerBernier credited the Harvard Library Collections Emergency Team and photograph conservators Erin Murphy and Elena Bulat with understanding that the chill could aid the rescue effort. With the plates stored in soaked paper sleeves, the biggest danger to the photographic emulsion was mold. Mold spots would mar a record that consists of thousands or even many tens of thousands of pinpoints of light. The best course, the team decided, was to get the plates into the sub-freezing air as quickly as possible.Since that night, the plates have been kept safely frozen and the mold at bay. They were transferred into refrigerated trailers, which are now stored with a North Andover company that specializes in document recovery. Early tests have suggested the photographic emulsion that coats one side of each plate will survive unaltered.Conservators are working with Jonathan Grindlay, the Robert Treat Paine Professor of Practical Astronomy, and others at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) to devise a process for restoring the plates. These will include extracting them from the paper sleeves, which have to be photographed because they include data critical to interpreting the images, and then cleaning them of silt and grime. The methods devised at the Weissman Preservation Center, Bernier said, will be taught to technicians at Polygon in North Andover, who will carry out the restoration work, which is expected to take a year and a half.Grindlay, who heads the DASCH project, and CfA director Charles Alcock expressed deep appreciation for both the tireless efforts of staff members and the expertise of the Harvard Library team.“People were cold and tired, but not one was dropped,” Alcock said. “I’m very encouraged so far — it’s not a good thing to go through, but the response has gotten us to a good place with respect to the flood.”Grindlay first imagined the scanning project in the 1980s, realizing that it would have to wait until computers were sophisticated enough to handle the enormous amount of data the plates contained, more than a petabyte.DASCH launched in 2004, with the first scans made in 2006. The project has covered about a third of the 525,000 plates, the first of which was shot in 1885 and the last in 1992. The data hold value for astronomers who are interested in changes in particular stellar objects, each of which was photographed between 500 and 3,000 times over the years. Findings have so far appeared in about 100 papers, Grindlay said.“There’s a tidal wave waiting to happen. There’s an enormous amount of data waiting for analysis.”Grindlay was at the CfA the night of the flood, having secured remote observation time on the Multiple Mirror Telescope on Mount Hopkins in Arizona. He and two grad students were collecting data about extreme variable stars they had identified through DASCH.Stacks of glass negatives of the sky taken around the world over a century, at the Center for Astrophysics. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerAt around 7 in the morning, Lindsay Smith, a senior curatorial technician, arrived at the plate stacks to calibrate the scanner for the day’s work. The building felt cold. When she descended the spiral staircase to the basement, she saw a couple of feet of water. Building manager Charles Hickey, who played a key role in the recovery effort, called the city of Cambridge to close the pipe. Workers later found that an eight-inch water main in the courtyard outside had ruptured 16 feet underground, sending muddy water though the soil and along the building’s foundation until it found a way in.Emails were sent out asking for help. Grad student Jane Huang was among the 17 responders who worked through the first night of the recovery and the 50 who worked in shifts over three days.“I knew my school needed help so I thought it would be good to pitch in,” Huang said.Edward Pickering, the Harvard College Observatory director who got the sky photography project going in the 1800s, was a bit paranoid that something would happen to the plates, Grindlay pointed out. He had the building specially made to hold up their weight — 170 tons — and oversaw the installation of sliding steel doors that could close rapidly in case of a fire.A new, faster scanner will arrive in May. It’s conceivable, Grindlay said, that the project could still end on time in 2018.“I hope we’ll be able to catch up.”last_img read more

Runners conquer 13.1 miles in Holy Half

first_imgWhether they were running to meet a personal goal, return to top physical condition, benefit local charities or spurred by other motivation, this year’s 1,300 Holy Half participants ensured the event’s continued success and recognition as a valued Notre Dame tradition. Low temperatures on Saturday posed the possibility of having to cancel the ninth-annual event, but by race time, runners received the go ahead from safety crews monitoring the event. Junior Connor Reider, running in his first Holy Half, commented favorably on the weather conditions at the start of the race. “When we started the race, the weather was beautiful. Once we were done, though, we were quickly reminded it was only 30 degrees outside,” Reider said. “The freezing wind combined with being soaked and not running around made a long warm shower even more appealing.” After volunteering for the event last year, Reider said he immediately added the event to his Notre Dame bucket list. While maintaining motivation often arose as a challenge throughout the training process and on race day, Reider said he held no regrets with his race experience. “I am definitely glad that I ran it and proud of my efforts. All my goals were met,” Reider said. “Plus, not everyone can say they have run a half-marathon.” Months of planning gave student programmers the assurance of successful race day operations. Junior Maria Murphy, lead programmer for the Holy Half, expressed complete satisfaction with the event. “The 2013 Holy Half was fantastic,” she said. “We had no major injuries, decent weather, lots of compliments on the course and overall experience, and a bunch of great volunteers who helped make the race a success. The race exceeded all of my expectations.” The official fundraising numbers have yet to be calculated, but Murphy estimated the event raised $35,000 for the Women’s Care Center and the Family Justice Center of St. Joseph’s County. Senior Ashley Markowski, director of the Student Union Board (SUB), echoed Murphy’s enthusiasm for the success of the event on race day. While responsibilities for Holy Half operations have shifted between groups during previous years, Markowski said SUB assumed command of programming and running the half marathon this year and into the future. “By placing the Holy Half under SUB, it gives it a permanent home under one organization,” she said. “This will hopefully make it more successful in future years as we will be able to make changes each year, based on the previous year’s experience.” Comments from community members and initial fundraising numbers for Saturday’s event certainly point towards future success for the Holy Half under its new leadership,” Murphy said. “In its nine years, the Holy Half Marathon has become a great Notre Dame tradition. I think the race has grown so much since its start because of the challenge the race itself presents to runners and the community-focused nature of the event,” Murphy said. “Runners can challenge themselves physically and, at the same time, help those in their community. The race is about so much more than running.”last_img read more

Corby Hall holds open house

first_imgFor young men at Notre Dame considering a religious vocation, the doors at Corby Hall are always open. On Wednesday night at 8 p.m., Corby Night, hosted by Holy Cross priests, brothers and seminarians, took place at Corby Hall for those young men discerning the priesthood. It began with a candlelight service in the chapel of the hall and was followed by a social hour, in which the undergraduates could get to know one another and speak with the religious leaders. Fr. Jim Gallagher, director of the Office of Vocations, said he could relate to young men deciding whether or not a life in the priesthood was right for them. “For the longest time it was on my mind but I never talked to anybody about it,” Gallagher said. “The most important thing is to talk to somebody.” Students at the event ranged from Notre Dame undergraduates and those living at Old College, the University’s undergraduate seminary for the Congregation of the Holy Cross, to seminarians who had already completed their undergraduate degree.  Vincent Nguyen, a Notre Dame senior who currently lives in Moreau Seminary, said he recognized his vocation as early as freshman year. “It was the community life and prayer life that brought it all together,” Nguyen said. As a seminarian, Nguyen said he is still an active member of the Notre Dame community and is able to balance the religious aspects of his life with academics and social activities.  “I’ve had practice with the balancing since I lived in Old College for the first three years,” Nguyen said. “I’m still involved on campus.” In the past 10 to 15 years, vocations to the priesthood in America have increased, Gallgher said. At a Catholic university such as Notre Dame, those thinking about committing to life as a priest have many resources to help them in their discernment, he said. “The sort of guys who might be thinking about a vocation will go to Notre Dame,” he said. “At Notre Dame there are a lot of opportunities to deepen one’s faith life.” However, a calling to the priesthood is not met without certain difficulties, he said. “One of the biggest challenges is commitment,” Gallagher said. “For young people today it’s hard because there are so many things for them to commit to.” Gallagher said talking to one of the many priests and brothers on campus is a good way for young men to introduce themselves and discuss their vocation. “My job is not to convince them to join the seminary,” Gallagher said. “My job is to help them decide whether or not the seminary is right for them.”last_img read more

Notre Dame Irish dance team to compete in All-Ireland Irish Dancing Championships

first_imgHaving Irish danced since she was a toddler, Notre Dame junior Addie Donaher said the adrenaline rush she gets walking out on stage is a sensation that has yet to waver in her career as a performer.“Being on stage is the reason that we all do it,” Donaher said. “You have those two minutes to get up on stage and show them, ‘I’ve been working for a whole year for these two minutes.’”As part of the Irish Echoes, Donaher — along with 7 other Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s students — will be competing this weekend in the All-Ireland Irish Dancing Championships. Photo courtesy of Hanna Dutler Members of the Irish Echoes, Notre Dame’s Irish dance group, compete in the All-Ireland Irish Dancing Championships every year.Fresh off their annual showcase last January, the Irish Echoes are a Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s Irish dance team consisting of roughly 70 members — the largest collegiate team in the nation, Donaher said.Members of the Ceili team — a subset of the Irish Echoes — were selected for the competition via tryout. The Ceili team is lead by juniors coach Hannah Dutler and assistant coach Emily Cline. Dutler and Cline are joined by seniors Caitlin O’Rourke, Rebecca Sidler, Kali Graziano and Lauren Tucker, juniors Donaher and Julia Forte and sophomores Kate Brown and Rachel Hughes.“I think everyone on the Ceili team has been dancing since they were three or four years old and has gone over to Ireland at least once or twice to compete,” Dutler said.The team flew out of Chicago on Tuesday night, landing in Dublin early Wednesday morning. After spending a day in the Irish capital, where they will get a chance to visit Notre Dame students currently studying abroad in Dublin, the women will be hopping on a bus to the competition’s host city, Killarney, a southwest Ireland town with around 14,000 residents.“Girls from all over the world come to compete, and then the competition that we’re in is a club Ceili competition,” Donaher said. “ … It’s like Irish clubs, [and] there’s a bunch of schools from the U.S.”With funding assistance from the Nanovic Institute and the Keough-Naughton Institute, the team has been able to travel to Ireland seven of the past 10 years for this competition and have found themselves atop the podium every time.“We have won the last seven years that we have competed, so hopefully we make it eight,” Dutler said.Dutler also noted that although the teams are strictly business backstage while preparing for their performances, the event gives many of the women the unique opportunity to reconnect with Irish dancers they trained with at past studios who may also be in Killarney for the week’s festivities.Whatever the outcome of Saturday’s competition, however, both Donaher and Dutler said they are thankful to the Irish Echoes for giving them a chance to form the friendships they have in their three years with the team, and for allowing them to continue their passion for Irish dance into their collegiate lives.“We’re all really close, and we all had that love for Irish dance that made us want to go to a school that had a team and keep doing it,” Donaher said. “We both danced competitively our whole lives, so it was such a big part of our life. And then coming to college you kind of expect that to stop. But here, it doesn’t really have to.”Tags: Irish dance, Irish Dance Team, irish echoeslast_img read more

Liaisons Among The Americas

first_imgBy Dialogo February 11, 2009 In 1997, a forward-thinking combatant commander conceptualized a plan to invite ‎partner-nation senior military officers — primarily colonels — to serve on his staff as ‎advisors, providing cultural expertise and coordination on military matters between their ‎countries and U.S. Southern Command.‎ One year later, Gen. Charles Wilhelm, then commander of the Southern Command, made ‎this vision a reality. Argentina and Uruguay were the first countries to send a senior ‎officer to work in the command, thus creating the Partner Nation Liaison Officer ‎program, or PNLO. The following year, Colombia and Ecuador also sent officers. Chile ‎began participating in the program in 2000, and Canada sent a liaison officer in 2007. ‎More than a decade later, the program still thrives.‎ ‎“The truth is that we have a small community within Southern Command and we share ‎our experiences,” said Chilean navy Capt. David Hardy, who along with his counterparts ‎from Uruguay, Peru, Colombia and Canada, form today’s PNLO program.‎ Their experience is invaluable as the command strengthens relationships with partner ‎nations. “The biggest benefit they bring is the experience of working in our region,” said ‎U.S. Air Force Col. Jose Sanchez, deputy director of country insight for the command. ‎ ‎“They were raised there, they know their militaries, they know how they think … and ‎they can give us feedback immediately.”‎ Peruvian army Col. César Alva is working on collaborative solutions to end terrorist ‎activities. “My main job is trying to collaborate in resolving narcoterrorism by means of ‎cooperation between Southern Command and the Peruvian armed forces,” he said. “I’m interested in maintaining a good cooperation program for 2009, and if possible, a five-‎year midterm plan where our objectives are clear … which are to end terrorism and ‎narcotrafficking.”‎ The liaison officer is a coveted position appointed by each country’s minister of defense. ‎The tour of duty ranges from one to two years, depending on the country’s agreement ‎with the command. Each officer usually receives a housing and transportation allowance ‎from their military. The officers usually have a good grasp of the English language and, ‎in many cases, speak more than two languages.‎ While the Southern Command benefits from the knowledge and experience of the liaison ‎officers, the program also gives officers and their families an opportunity to experience ‎U.S. culture.‎ ‎“My experience until now has been excellent. It’s the first time my family and I have ‎been in the United States,” Uruguayan army Col. Luis Lavista said. “There are some very ‎interesting and enjoyable things for people coming from South America to the United States, above all order, transportation, respect for the laws, and there’s a lot of security.”‎ The Miami-based command has been working to integrate liaison officers into more of its ‎activities, including conferences and regional exercises such as PANAMAX. Liaison ‎officers have also been visiting component commands, including U.S. Army South in San ‎Antonio; U.S. Navy South in Jacksonville, Fla.; and U.S. Marine Corp Forces South in ‎Miami, to learn more about U.S. military operations.‎ ‎“By taking them to the component commands, they see their roles and missions. And we ‎try to teach them how we interact with each other and how our components interact with ‎the headquarters,” Col. Sanchez said. “Once they get that view, they are able to better ‎understand the projects that would help us — and them. We have to remember that ‎interoperability is a big thing between our armed forces and our partner nations.”‎ With the command expected to move into a new facility in late 2010, current commander ‎Adm. Jim Stavridis has invited more countries to participate in the mutually beneficial ‎program.‎ The officers who have served in the program support increased participation. “We don’t ‎have to be [only] four [countries]. We should have liaison officers here from all ‎countries,” Col. Lavista said. If all countries were represented, he said, they would have ‎the ability to work better collectively.‎last_img read more

Partner Nation Air Forces Direct Aid to Mexico following Earthquake

first_imgBy Julieta Pelcastre/Diálogo September 29, 2017 Air forces from the System of Cooperation among the American Air Forces (SICOFAA, per its Spanish acronym), came to Mexico’s aid after a 7.1-magnitude earthquake on the Richter scale shook the country on September 19th, leaving hundreds of victims dead and thousands injured and affected. This new telluric movement occurred exactly 32 years after the earthquake that left thousands dead on September 19, 1985. “SICOFAA member nations quickly agreed to cancel the Cooperación V air exercise that was to be held in Chile from September 26th to October 7th,” Colonel Rodrigo Zapata, the director of the Colombian Air Force’s National Rescue and Special Operations Center, told Diálogo. “The countries that had expressed their commitment to participating in the exercise deployed their aid to Mexico.” The Colombian, Ecuadorean, Salvadoran, and U.S. air forces were the first to provide the specialized humanitarian technical assistance offered to the Mexican government and people to bolster their search and rescue work following the earthquake. Almost immediately, the Mexican Armed Forces deployed more than 11,000 soldiers to provide assistance. “This foreign assistance has meant a lot to Mexicans. Rest assured that we will be forever grateful,” Mexican Navy Admiral Vidal Francisco Soberón, Mexican Secretary of the Navy, stated on social media. Mexican Secretary of the Interior Miguel Ángel Osorio Chong said that “domestic and international cooperation has been essential for saving lives.” SICOFAA, through its many events and previous exercises, has helped to create a sense of unity, camaraderie, and mutual support among the air forces of the Americas, and you see that on display in the relief effort as many SICOFAA member countries have sent aid to Mexico,” U.S. Air Force Colonel Anthony G. Cook, the secretary general of SICOFAA, told Diálogo. SICOFAA is a voluntary, non-political organization devoted to promoting cooperation, unity, and interoperability among the 20 air forces of partner nations in the Americas. Outpouring of solidarity The earthquake caused damage in the states of Guerrero, Mexico, Morelos, and Puebla, as well as in the nation’s capital. Several parts of Mexico City were declared disaster zones less than two weeks after another huge earthquake had caused damage in the states of Chiapas and Oaxaca. “The first 72 hours are crucial in these kinds of tragedies. The levels of coordination and communication must facilitate a rapid and timely response to complete the mission,” Col. Zapata said. “Helping our allies when they are in need is one of the most important things we do as a nation,” added U.S. Air Force Captain Kyle Brackett of the 21st Airlift Squadron. “Two days after the earthquake, humanitarian aid from the United States arrived at Military Air Base No. 2 on board a C-17 [from the U.S. Air Force] in a great gesture of solidarity,” Adm. Soberón reported. “The airlift unit transported 33 tons of equipment and an elite Disaster Assistance Response Team (DART) from the Los Angeles County Fire Department.” The Colombian government also deployed aid. It sent a Colombian Air Force Boeing 727 Vulcan, a rescue team, a 10-ton load of humanitarian aid, and two canine teams to assist the Mexican authorities with their search-and-rescue duties. The day after the earthquake, the Salvadoran Air Force transported 25 elite rescuers from El Salvador’s Urban Search and Rescue Group in a C-47 turboprop plane. The delegation traveled with enough food, supplies, and provisions to be self-sufficient during their stay in Mexico. Ecuador sent an L-100-30 Hercules transport plane from the Ecuadorean Air Force. Its aid mission comprised 30 people with medical and communications equipment that helped in the planning, search with canines, and the breaking down, perforation, lifting, and removal of debris. The Costa Rican team arrived on a Beechcraft King Air F90 belonging to the Costa Rican National Police by pilots from the Aerial Surveillance Service of the Costa Rican Ministry of Public Safety. This group comprised experts on assessing the structural damage to buildings. Chile, Guatemala, Honduras, and Peru also sent their best rescuers to work with the Mexican authorities in their search-and-rescue efforts for people trapped under the rubble. Other nations from around the world, including Israel, Japan, and Spain, joined the international aid effort, sending contingents with tons of unconditional aid to the Aztec nation. The personnel in these foreign delegations were coordinated by Mexico’s Secretariat of the Navy, National Defense Secretariat, Federal Police, and Civil Defense authorities. Rescue missions were conducted 24 hours a day and they also assisted in assessing the damage caused by the quake. Coordination, synergy, and training “Even though the aid was dispatched to Mexico through various diplomatic communication channels, we always keep in communication and coordination with SICOFAA when this kind of international aid is provided,” Col. Zapata noted. “No nation is exempt from these unwanted disasters.” “It is important to note the synergy among our partner forces when responding jointly to a large-scale emergency and joining forces to benefit the nation affected, which, in this case, was Mexico,” Armando Rodríguez Luna, an expert on military and security issues with the Collective for the Analysis of Security with Democracy (CASEDE, per its Spanish acronym) in Mexico City, told Diálogo. “Because earthquakes are a constant in Mexico and in other countries in the Latin American region, this type of phenomenon must be given priority in the agendas of the Mexican Armed Forces and other armed forces in the region in order to jointly bolster our capabilities and develop new ones.” “This entire experience, plus the opportunity to participate in combined training exercises at the national and international levels, such as [SICOFAA’s] multilateral ‘Cooperación’ exercise, enriches our experience and expertise in the planning, control, and execution of operations in cases of natural disasters,” Col. Zapata concluded. “We will always be ready and willing to assist our partner nations.”last_img read more

Our 100 day AWS transformation

first_img This post is currently collecting data… Any business worth their salt has values, you see them in the HR handbook, new hire PowerPoints, sales presentations and on walls as you tour offices (remember doing that?!).It is hard for them not to be a cliché… Integrity! Honesty! I mean, shouldn’t you have those anyway?!When I joined Think|Stack I was presented with our values – Human Centered Design, Entrepreneurial Spirit, Passionate Rebels and Family Trust. I have to admit I did an internal eye roll. Over the years though, I have been excited to see myself and our team embody them, become empowered by them and continue to evolve them.In the spring we were presented with an opportunity to enter into a 100 day “Partner Transformation Program” (PTP) with our cloud vendor Amazon Web Services (AWS). The program gave us an opportunity to shine a spotlight on our cloud practice and make improvements through a consultant led program addressing architecture, delivery, finance, sales and marketing. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrcenter_img This is placeholder text continue reading »last_img read more