Do it again: Mighty Mouse defends belt vs Cejudo at UFC 227

first_imgMOST READ Mighty Mouse loves the practice of mixed martial arts, and he thrives on the discipline necessary to hone his skills. But that’s just about all Johnson cares about in the MMA game — and that’s basically why one of the greatest fighters in the sport’s history isn’t even headlining the show at UFC 227 on Saturday night in Staples Center.During 11 consecutive title defenses of increasing brilliance, Johnson has become arguably the most tactically well-rounded and creative fighter ever to step inside a cage. But when asked if he is the greatest mixed martial artist in the sport’s history, Johnson dismisses the question with an arched eyebrow and tries to turn the discussion back to video games, his true passion.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone still willing to coach Gilas but admits decision won’t be ‘simple yes or no’“That kind of thing is all about hype and what other people think,” Johnson said. “I don’t really worry about it.”The 5-foot-3 Johnson’s disinterest in his legacy has been underlined by his steady refusal to move back up in weight from the 125-pound flyweight class to the 135-pound bantamweight division, where he fought earlier in his career. While he has hinted there’s a dollar figure that could change his mind, Johnson would rather keep embarrassing the world’s top flyweights instead of chasing a superfight with bantamweight champ T.J. Dillashaw or former champ Cody Garbrandt, who will meet in the main event at UFC 227 in another rematch. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Judy Ann’s 1st project for 2020 is giving her a ‘stomachache’ Gov’t in no rush to rescue animals in Taal Dib quits after losing to Farmer in IBF super featherweight bout Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Palace OKs total deployment ban on Kuwait OFWs After winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folk LATEST STORIES “I don’t care,” Johnson said. “That’s not my goal. I’m just focused on Henry Cejudo.”Cejudo was knocked out by Johnson just 28 months ago in the first round of their much-hyped meeting, but the Olympic gold medalist freestyle wrestler is already back for another crack at the most unsolvable problem in MMA. Although Cejudo is only six months younger than Johnson, Cejudo started training in mixed martial arts in January 2013 — four months after Johnson won the UFC belt in his 19th professional fight.The reason for this rerun is twofold: Cejudo is a better, more experienced fighter now — and Johnson would rather grant a rematch to a flyweight than chase bigger bouts with bigger fighters.Nobody doubts Cejudo has improved in the two years since his loss to Johnson. He embarked on a worldwide quest to round out his game with trips to Brazil, Thailand and the Netherlands, and he has won his two fights in the interim against contenders Wilson Reis and Sergio Pettis.Yet even the Los Angeles-born Cejudo knows he’s a major underdog against Johnson in the UFC’s first show in three years at LA’s most prominent arena.ADVERTISEMENTcenter_img FILE – Demetrious Johnson (r) battles Wilson Reis (l) during their Flyweight Championship bout on UFC Fight Night at the Sprint Center on April 15, 2017 in Kansas City, Missouri. Jamie Squire/Getty Images/AFPLOS ANGELES — Demetrious Johnson has been the UFC flyweight champion for the entire existence of the weight class, becoming the longest-reigning champion in the promotion’s 25-year history. He has won 13 consecutive bouts and cleaned out the 125-pound division so thoroughly that previously trounced opponents are getting second chances.Yet any discussion about Johnson’s place in the mythical pound-for-pound rankings or the annals of UFC history ends quickly, due to Johnson’s insistence that he couldn’t care less.ADVERTISEMENT “Even my fans might not think I can win, but I use all of that as motivation,” said Cejudo, who ended up flattened by Johnson’s blizzard of strikes in their first bout. “I burn it for fuel. Somebody has to dethrone him. There has to be a new story line. The baton has to be passed, and it’s my time.”One flickering reason for optimism exists for Cejudo: Johnson is coming back from the longest layoff of his 11-year professional career. Thanks to an injury, Mighty Mouse hasn’t fought since last October, when he submitted Ray Borg.Johnson dutifully fulfilled his promotional responsibilities this week in Los Angeles and then ducked back to his hotel room to play video games on his laptop. Although cordial to most reporters, Johnson has been actively antagonistic toward the media in general for years, repeatedly complaining about instances of what he sees as inaccurate coverage.Yet Johnson also has complained about his paychecks relative to other UFC champions, apparently failing to see the connection between his level of fame and the public’s interest in paying to watch his fights. Johnson wants the prizes without playing the game, oddly enough for a relentless gamer who can get advertising and subscription revenue from his streaming exploits.Perhaps Johnson sees the contradiction, but it doesn’t change the way he approaches his sport or his real life. He fights for self-improvement, and for money to support his wife and soon-to-be three children — and not for anyone else’s approval.“I’m not going to go out and buy a Rolex (after a fight),” Johnson said. “I’m going to buy video games and a new computer. That’s just who I am.” ‘High crimes and misdemeanors’: Trump impeachment trial begins Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Peza offers relief to ecozone firms In fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ View commentslast_img read more

The Paris Massacre—What Next?

first_imgBefore midnight last Friday the world was alarmed by the massacre of over 123 people as a result of a spate of indiscriminate shootings and suicide bomb blasts in the center of France’s glittering capital, Paris.As people enjoyed a casual Friday evening witnessing a concert and having dinner and drinks in one of the world’s most beautiful cities, gunmen and women, who claimed to be Islamists, with deadly automatic weapons, stormed the Bataclan Theatre and neighboring cafes, shooting people at random. In the end, 123 people were counted dead and over 352 people wound, 99 of whom are in critical condition.As predicted by most political and security watchers, the Islamic State (IS), whose trademark is ruthless kidnapping, killing and indiscriminate destruction, immediately claimed responsibility for the massacre.How long can the world be expected to put up with this Islamic State which, since it declared itself a caliphate in June 2014 after acquiring huge tracts of land in Syria and Iraq, has been noted for barbarity, mass killings, abductions and beheadings?But before tackling this question, we must ask another: how did the Middle East become so terribly destabilized? Without claiming to be experts in international affairs, we can say without fear of contradiction that the root of the problem has been the shortsighted policies of some Western governments, notably the United States, which perennially and blindly backed some of the most oppressive Islamic regimes, such as Iran. The USA’s backing of the Shah of Iran for so long because of oil, led to the popular Iranian Revolution in 1979 and the invasion of the US embassy in November of that year, the taking over 60 hostages, leading to the fall of the Carter administration.The second major American mistake was President George W. Bush’s invasion of Iraq, against the better judgment of many other nations and tens of millions of his own fellow Americans. But no, GW had to invade Iraq, to avenge the alleged attempt by Saddam Hussein to kill young Bush’s father. And GW carried out his ruthless invasion under a false pretext, that Saddam had a stockpile of “weapons of mass destruction.”One of the most painful consequences of that invasion was what happened to the Christian churches in many parts of the Middle East, especially Iraq and Syria. These churches had existed since the time of Peter and the other early Christian fathers. Remember, Saul, who later became the eminent Apostle Paul, was, shortly following the crucifixion of Christ, on his way to Damascus, the Syrian capital, to kill Christians. Saul was suddenly struck down by a voice from Heaven asking the very serious question, “Saul, Saul, why persecuteth thou me?”The rest is history. Saul was led to a man named Ananias, who restored Saul’s sight, renamed him Paul – who went on to become the church’s greatest Apostle. Christians have had a presence in the Middle East ever since.Say what you may of Saddam Hussein, but though himself a Muslim, he was committed to religious tolerance and vigorously protected the Christians in Iraq. Today the Christians have been run out of Iraq, and Syria, by the Islamic State. Does this make George W. Bush look like the anti Christ? Only history will tell.Another problem that has caused the Middle East to be destabilized is America’s blind support of Israel and its ruthless atrocities inflicted upon the Palestinians. This is one of the primary causes of the hate and resentment Washington experiences throughout the Middle East and the Islamic world. Heaven knows when this will end, for America seems to believe that Israel can do no wrong. Washington has done nothing to stop the Israelis from occupying Palestinian land.Perhaps the most serious cause of instability in the Middle East is Syrian President Assad who, because of his lust for power, has effectively destroyed his country and caused his own people so much pain, distress and anguish. It is he more than anyone else that has given rise to the ruthless and bloodthirsty Islamic caliphate.Finally, we lay a lot of the blame for the power that IS now has at the feet of President Barrack Obama and his timid approach to the Syrian crisis. Surely the USA is the world’s most powerful nation and leader of the also powerful Western alliance. We firmly believe that Obama, backed his committed partners, Britain, France, Germany, the EU, could have nipped IS in the bud from its very beginning. But oh! The problem of indecisiveness and the terrible consequences it is now wreaking.How long will indecisiveness cause innocent people to suffer and die?France and all other European nations, the USA and Russia must mount a joint response to terrorism from wherever it comes. Evil can be defeated, and defeated it must be. But also, America and its allies MUST be more sincere and more proactive and decisive in their dealing with the Palestinian issue. There can be no real peace in the Middle East—or anywhere else—until the Palestinian problem is fully and decisively resolved.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more