Leh avalanche: Two more bodies recovered, toll rises to seven

first_imgTwo more bodies were recovered, while three people remained missing on the second day of rescue operation in Leh’s avalanche-hit Khardung La Pass, located at an altitude of 18,380 ft.“After two days of rescue operations, seven bodies have been recovered. Three remain missing, for whom the rescue will resume at the first light on Sunday. The seven bodies are being airlifted to Zanskar on Sunday morning so that they can be handed over to their families,” deputy commissioner of Leh, Avny Lavasa, told The Hindu. The rescue was called off on Friday evening due to inclement weather and was resumed on Saturday morning. High-tech gadgets, including human detectors, and sniffer dogs were used to trace the civilians buried under snow, said an official.Five locals killed in the avalanche were working as porters with the Army. Two vehicles carrying 10 civilians were swept away and buried under the avalanche of approximately 20 ft depth and 800 m length which hit the Khardung La Top-South Pullu stretch on the world’s highest motorable road on Friday morning. The rescue is being jointly carried out by the State police, the Army and the State Disaster Response Force. It is likely to enter a difficult phase on Sunday as the meteorological department forecast more snow in Kashmir and Ladakh in the next three days and possibility of more avalanches in the upper reaches.Fresh avalanche warnings Divisional Commissioner, Kashmir, Baseer Ahmad Khan on Saturday issued avalanche warning for nine avalanche-prone districts of Kashmir division.“The warning has been issued for the avalanche-prone areas of district Anantnag, Kulgam, Budgam, Baramulla, Kupwara, Bandipora, Ganderbal, Kargil and Leh,” said Mr. Khan.People living in areas were advised “not to venture out to avoid the loss of lives”.“Deputy Commissioner are asked to take all the precautionary measures and to keep the SDRF, police and para-medical staff with ambulances in readiness to avert any untoward incident,” said Mr. Khan.last_img read more

HubSpot TV – Social Media & the Election

first_img Takeaway: Find out where you customers are hanging out and what technology they are using and target them there. Your inbound markeitng strategy is not about being on MySpace or Facebook or mobile – its about being where you can attract the most customers most effectively. Voters Watching Online Video More Engaged in the Election, Cisco/Compete Survey Finds – NYTimes was tracking peoples feelings – http://blog.clickz.com/081105-165141.html Like HubSpot TV? http://daveibsen.typepad.com/5_blogs_before_lunch/2008/10/mcdonalds-brings-back-the-mcrib-and-is-taking-it-mobile.html Mobile Promotion for a Sandwich Headlines – Twitter #voteReport had what people were seeing – How do you effectively launch a viral video campaign? Julie at www.laserexpedition.com Visits to Obama Site Nearly Double Those to McCain Site in September – Nielsen Online shows that visitors to the web site of Democrat Barack Obama have outpaced those to the site of Republican John McCain by a nearly 2-1 margin. The firm said that unique visitors to BarackObama.com totaled 7.9 million in September, while those to JohnMcCain.com were 4.2 million. Total video streams on JohnMcCain.com were 3.2 million, nearly triple the figure from August. Video streams on BarackObama.com also increase 60% to 2.0 million. HubSpot TV Episode #14 – November 7, 2008 It’s time for change. Dive into inbound marketing. Now (new president, bad economy) is the perfect time.   Subscribe in iTunes US Navy Issues Web 2.0 – Takeaway: This election changed how social media is used and people’s awareness of it. This will only increase it’s value and the number of people using it. Don’t be left behind. Takeaway: Does your company have a social media guideline? If not, coming up with one might not be a bad idea. Marketing Tip of the Week – Did all that Social Media work for Obama? (PDF) http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2008/11/04/us/politics/20081104_ELECTION_WORDTRAIN.html http://www.change.gov/newsroom/blog/ center_img Email List Hygiene – http://blog.compete.com/2008/11/04/election-day-obama-mccain-palin/ 33.5 Million people watched the Obamamercial – http://blog.compete.com/2008/10/31/presidential-election-online-video-viewing/ Forum Fodder Keep your email marketing lists clean! Put a program in place to manage your bounced addresses. http://www.xconomy.com/boston/2008/11/04/obama-voters-text-support-to-locamoda-display-in-times-square/ http://search.twitter.com/search?q=%23votereport Takeaway: People watching online video are more engaged. Start experimenting with online video to try and engage your customers. Mailbag Obama has a blog, will it continue? – Election Recap http://www.webinknow.com/2008/11/us-navy-issues-one-of-the-first-social-media-guidelines-in-the-government-sector.html http://www.nielsen-online.com/pr/pr_081031_2.pdf http://daveibsen.typepad.com/5_blogs_before_lunch/2008/10/obamamercial-pulls-in-335-million-viewers.html  Obama text-to-Times-Sq Jumbotron Experiment – The parrot is back! – @gboyle2011 requested that the parrot come back to the show Obama’s site had a 60% rise in traffic the week before the election, McCain’s had just 9% – http://success.hubspot.com/Customer-Discussion-Forum/forumid/97/postid/5349/view/topic Originally published Nov 9, 2008 1:58:00 PM, updated July 04 2013 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

HubSpot TV – Sharing the Love on Slideshare with Guest Marta Kagan

first_img What the Fk is Social Media? How to interact on Twitter: @ Intro Survey by B to B Magazine and the Association of Natinoal Advertisers ! Register here: Most looking to implement in the next year (1) blogging (2) mobile (more for BtoC) karenrubin Webinars are almost exclusively for B2B – 48% of B2B marketers said they were effective, only 6% of B2C said they were effective www.HubSpot.tv , 13 hours of video is upload to YouTube every minute : If you’ve been watching HubSpot TV for the past year, you’d be ahead of the curve! Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack More focus on demand generation – from 39% to 47% of people – also a drop-off of people saying brand building was the goal 3 out of 4 Americans use social technology – Forrester HubSpot TV 1 Year Anniversa Marta Kagan, @ Marketing Takeaway Closing Watch the Tweetup Promo Video: Download the free webinar JamonHolmgren asks, B to B marketers embracing social media at an increasing rate Microsoft and Yahoo sitting in a tree…K.I.S.S.I.N.G! “Providing accurate, useful information that informs in a non-self-promoting manner gains credibility,” mzkagan Managing Director of US for Espresso Originally published Aug 2, 2009 8:54:00 PM, updated July 04 2013 81% of BtoB marketers using LinkedIn, then Twitter, then Facebook (Twitter much higher for B2B, Facebook lower for B2B) 5 billion minutes spent on Facebook each day Blogging in a Flooded Market Shouldn’t Mean Failure Marketing Takeaway “Bing also surfaces only the top 5 results for many queries, meaning a higher concentration of clicks on those top results.” Webinar: How to Use Online Video for Inbound Marketing Defininga “tweet” for the uninitiated and explaining how to create an accountdoesn’t resonate with everyone. “Why would I want to do that?” is acommon reaction. However, demonstrating the power of Twitter as adiscovery engine for what is happening right now through our Search andTrends often awakens a sense of wonder which inevitably leads to a muchmore compelling question, “How do I get involved?” “thebig takeaway is that Bing will now power search on Yahoo! and Yahoo!’ssalesforce will sell the premium (non-self service) search advertisingfor Yahoo!/Bing” http://itunes.hubspot.tv/ You will want to optimize for Bing since it will have a reasonable % of market share , @ Social Media Defamation Lawsuit “Beyourself and blog about the things that excite and interest you(without sounding like a commercial, of course) and you’ll be fine,” Don’t panic! You have some time on this onebut be aware that it is going on and you will probably want to optimizefor it eventually. : Make sure you understand the engagement process for your customers. Marketing Takeaway #2 “Themore you can build relationships and trust with the online leaders inyour community, the more traffic you’ll get on your site, and the morepeople you’ll be able to convert to leads and sales,” ” Top 10 Things the Microsoft/Yahoo! Deal Changes for SEO Bingvalues “keyword use in subdomains and root domain names (Google lovesexact keyword matches, but Bing really likes any keyword placement inthe sub or root)” Headlines Forum Fodder: 57% of B2B marketers “using social media channels” compared with 15% two years ago : As a business, monitor and respond on Twitter, but think twice before blowing anything up. New Twitter homepage puts search at its heart ry Tweetup Marketing Takeaway Next Week: Bonafied Marketing Genius Doing it Right http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UKaJs4L290A UPDATED: Rounding up the buzz… Will one Chicago woman’s Tweet cost her $50,000? http://hstv1year.eventbrite.com “Rememberthat Yahoo! said full implementation may lag up to 24 months (2 years)behind regulatory approval (which itself could take months), so you’vegot some time.” mvolpe mzkagan Twitter Puts Search at Core of Homepage with AmandaBonnen: “@JessB123 You should just come anyway.  Who said sleeping in amoldy apartment is bad for you?  Horizon Realty thinks its ok.” Episode #51 – July 31st, 2009 HorizonRealty says she “maliciously and wrongfully published the false anddefamatory Tweet on Twitter, thereby allowing the Tweet to bedistributed throughout the world.”  (She has 20 followers.) “What can I add to the conversation that a better programmeror graphic designer or SEO professional hasn’t already covered?” 93% of social media users believe a company should have a presence in social media Social media use soars among b-to-b marketers : Don’t tweet anything you wouldn’t mind having on the front page of Google.com. – Publish something creative on Slideshare. Marketing Tip of the Week , and @ in your tweet. How do you get started with YouTube, video podcasting, live streaming, or viral videos. Marketing Takeaway to learn how to use online video to grow your business with inbound marketing. Episode Length: 23 minutes, 23 seconds Subscribe in iTunes:last_img read more

LinkedIn Releases Offical Share Button

first_imgToday, LinkedIn, the social network targeted towards business professionals, released its offical share button . The button allows LinkedIn users to easily share content they find interesting and relevant with their network. Publishers can find instructions for how to add the share button on the Marketing Takeaway With all easily implemented options for sharing content such as Facebook, Twitter, Digg, Delicious, etc. it probably isn’t going to be the ease of execution that determines how successful LinkedIn’s share button is.  At 85 million users and a new users joining every second the success of LinkedIn’s share button is going to fall in the hands of it’s users.   Once you have taken the time to create remarkable content make sure that you are doing everything you can to share it with your entire network.  Since your LinkedIn network may find your content relevant this is an excellent way allow them to help you spread your content beyond your immediate reach.  Head on over to LinkedIn to try out your share button today. Originally published Nov 30, 2010 3:00:00 PM, updated October 20 2016center_img Social Media Engagement Since those connected on LinkedIn most likely share business interests, it is very likely that the LinkedIn share button becomes a standard for business related content.   Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack portion of the LinkedIn site.  LinkedIn is offering three options to choose from: a vertical button with a share counter, a horizontal button with a share counter, and a horizontal button without a counter.  To add a button to your website or blog all you need to do is choose a button style and copy and paste a few lines of code.  publishers Topics:last_img read more

Inbound Marketing Vs The Yellow Pages [Cartoon]

first_imgWhen I talk with most marketers about how they generate leads and fill the top of their sales funnel, most say outbound marketing.However, in 2019, a lot of innovative and successful businesses are actually embracing the art of inbound marketing. But, what’s the difference between inbound and outbound? This post will walk you through it. First, we’ll talk about the more traditional outbound marketing strategies.Learn how to run more impactful, measurable marketing campaigns. What is Outbound Marketing?Outbound marketing is a traditional method of marketing seeking to obstruct potential customers. Outbound marketing includes activities such as trade shows, seminar series and cold calling. It is costly and the ROI is much lower than inbound marketing.Outbound marketing included trade shows, seminar series, email blasts to purchased lists, internal cold calling, outsourced telemarketing, and advertising. I call these methods “outbound marketing” because marketers push his or her message out far and wide hoping that it resonates with that needle in the haystack. I think outbound marketing techniques are getting less and less effective over time for two reasons.  First, your average human today is inundated with over 2000 outbound marketing interruptions per day and is figuring out more and more creative ways to block them out, including caller ID, spam filtering, Tivo, and Sirius satellite radio.  Second, the cost of coordination around learning about something new or shopping for something new using the internet (search engines, blogs, and social media) is now much lower than going to a seminar at the Marriott or flying to a trade show in Las Vegas. Transforming Your Marketing from Outbound to InboundRather than doing outbound marketing to the masses of people who are trying to block you out, I advocate doing inbound marketing where you help yourself “get found” by people already learning about and shopping in your industry.  In order to do this, you need to set your website up like a “hub” for your industry that attracts visitors naturally through search engines, blogging, and social media.  I believe most marketers today spend 90% of their efforts on outbound marketing and 10% on inbound marketing, and I advocate that those ratios flip.Outbound vs. Inbound MarketingOutbound marketing is when a marketer reaches out to people to see if they’re interested in a product. For example, this could include door-to-door sales or cold calling where a sales rep or marketer approaches someone without knowing if he or she is even a qualified lead. Inbound marketing is a strategy where you create content or social media tactics that spread brand awareness so people learn about you, might go to your website for information, and then purchase or show interest in your product.While some outbound strategies take lots of time and effort and may yield no leads, inbound strategies allow you to engage an audience of people that you can more easily qualify as a prospect of lead.The best analogy I can come up with is that traditional marketers looking to garner interest from new potential customers are like lions hunting in the jungle for elephants.  The elephants used to be in the jungle in the ’80s and ’90s when they learned their trade, but they don’t seem to be there anymore.  They have all migrated to the watering holes on the savannah (the internet).  So, rather than continuing to hunt in the jungle, I recommend setting up shop at the watering hole or turning your website into its own watering hole.Editor’s Note: A more detailed version of this article has been published here: “Inbound Marketing and the Next Phase of Marketing on the Web.”  This post specifically was originally published in 2010 but was updated in October 2019 for comprehensiveness.   Originally published Oct 30, 2019 3:05:00 PM, updated October 31 2019 Topics:center_img Switching to Inbound Marketing Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

Understanding the New Roles in Marketing

first_imgAnd as the role of marketing grows, it also continues to evolve. Today’s marketing department, for example, looks very different than it did even just a few short years ago. In fact, a collection of new roles has emerged, and they’re growing in importance within many marketing teams. Let’s examine what each of these roles consist of, and why you might want to consider adding them to your growing marketing team.New Marketing Roles of Growing ImportanceMarketing Operations / Pipeline SpecialistMarketing operations professionals are charged with monitoring, measuring, and analyzing the effectiveness of marketing initiatives as they relate to the overall company’s goals. Marketing operations staff work closely with Sales, and sometimes also have a sales operations counterpart. Together, they manage the relationship between Marketing and Sales to ensure that both sides are optimized to deliver (Marketing’s role) and work (Sales’ role) the highest quality leads, something HubSpot has grown fond of calling “SMarketing.” Marketing operations staff make projections about the quality of the sales and marketing pipeline and find efficiencies that will make the company work better as a whole.  Marketing operations would be a fit for anyone who has an analytical mind and is interested in marketing and sales strategy. Karen Rubin, a HubSpotter in a marketing operations role adds: “We focus on helping our marketers get the analytics they need, running monthly reports, and understanding why data and results are looking the way they do at any given point.” Customer Evangelist / Customer Experience ProfessionalsIn 2011, Forrester released a report called “The Rise of the Chief Customer Officer.” The report detailed a trend existing among B2B and B2C companies alike — hiring an individual to oversee customer communications and customer happiness. While the report focuses on a formal, executive-level role (“CCO”), we’ve seen this trend at all levels in companies.  Roles under this subset include community managers, customer experience designers, and customer communications officers. Skills and focus areas range, but the customer evangelist is essentially the internal voice of the customer within a company. Sometimes measured by Net Promoter Score surveys or user testing, their role aims to keep customer happiness and loyalty high by making customers’ experiences with the company easy and rewarding. Beyond being “the right thing to do,” creating a positive customer experience actually drives results. In fact, according to Nielsen’s April 2012 Global Trust in Advertising report, 92% of consumers worldwide trust recommendations from friends and family more than any form of advertising. In a socially driven market, the role of a customer evangelist becomes all the more critical.Inbound Marketing StrategistIt’s no news to us, but recent research from SiriusDecisions underscores the shift that B2B companies are making toward inbound marketing as a core strategy, and the need for more inbound marketing talent. “More than any other new approach, inbound marketing is rapidly becoming a standard part of the marketing mix,” writes Jay Gaines, who leads SiriusDecisions’ Demand Creation Strategies advisory service. Inbound marketing strategists must have a comprehensive mix of skills including search engine optimization, content strategy, and content mapping against a lead’s decision-making process. Gaines writes: “SiriusDecisions expects the inbound marketer to become a fixture in the majority of b-to-b marketing organizations in the next one to two years.”Lead Nurturing SpecialistAs most savvy marketers will tell you, attracting traffic and converting those visitors into leads is only half the battle. All too many potential customers get stuck in the middle of the marketing funnel, never continuing on to make an actual purchase. Professionals skilled in lead nurturing help marketing teams deliver highly tailored content to guide leads to a point of decision. And research shows that personalized marketing leads to more customer conversions than generalized communications.The lead nurturing role in an organization is steeped in customer and lead data. According to that same AMA/Duke University CMO Survey, “The ability to leverage information about customers in order to deliver and demonstrate value opens the door for marketers to fill the role as analysts and ‘data whisperers.'” Documentarian / VideographerTechnology has lowered the barriers to creating high-quality videos, making creation and distribution more affordable for companies of all sizes. As a result, video as a form of content is on the rise. It’s no surprise then, that 87% of online marketers use video content, according to Outbrain’s State of Content Marketing. Not to mention that Social Media Examiner reported earlier this year that 76% of marketers planned to increase their use of YouTube and video marketing, making it the top area marketers would invest in for 2012.As part of this investment in video as a content format, many companies are adding videographers to their marketing teams. We asked Chris Savage, co-founder and CEO of Wistia, a video hosting and analytics provider, what companies should look for when hiring video talent. “Adding the right videographer to your team can unlock an entire new channel of content for you,” said Savage. “The key is finding someone who has a mix of skills that complement your existing team. Besides just the basics of lighting, shooting, and editing, you really want someone who has a strong sense for what topics will be most successful on video.”Partnership / Co-Marketing ManagerCo-marketing is the practice of two, complementary companies collaborating on content or marketing initiatives. As a result, co-marketing brings fresh perspectives to your marketing initiatives and helps each company reach an audience that might not otherwise have found them. Dan Slagen, head of global marketing relations at HubSpot leads our co-marketing initiatives. Dan explains, “We partner with like-minded companies on projects that will help promote the marketing industry. For HubSpot, the value of working with partners such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Salesforce, and Google has been an array of thought leadership, brand alignment, and new business opportunities for all parties involved.”Changes to Existing RolesIn addition to the growing prominence of some newer roles, a number of existing marketing roles have begun to change and adapt as well. Here are some top trends we’ve noticed.Social Media as a Core SkillFive years ago, a marketing department might have hired a young graduate to head up its social media strategy. But according to the 2011 Webmarketing123 State of Digital Marketing report, with an average of 68% of marketers generated leads from social media sites, social media is no longer a specialization but rather a core marketing skill. As such, new marketing hires at every level should be expected to understand and contribute to social media strategies. Analytics as a Core SkillAs you may have noticed above, analytics and data are playing a big role in emerging marketing positions. In fact, the AMA/Duke CMO survey cites that spending on marketing analytics is expected to increase 60% by 2015. As marketing departments grow in size and marketing budgets increase, the ability to measure the effectiveness of marketing campaigns and channels will become more and more essential. Read more about how to cultivate a data-driven marketing team in this blog post.The Technology CMOIn a Gartner study, Vice President of Marketing Strategies Laura McLellan asserts, “By 2017, the CMO will spend more on IT than the CIO.” Her assertion is backed by survey data in which 90% of respondents said that the marketing department is either solely responsible or leads a cross-functional team that sets the strategy for technology purchasing decisions. Marketers have more and more say in the technology they use to do their jobs. Enough said.Media Relations: Less Pitch, More SupportAccording to the AMA/Duke University CMO survey, only 53% of companies are using marketing staff for traditional public relations activities, which is a significant step down from 65% in 2011. Talking with Laura Fitton, HubSpot’s inbound marketing evangelist, you’ll quickly learn that she prioritizes being helpful to journalists and bloggers over pitching to them. Even when it doesn’t result in a news story about HubSpot, Laura’s priority is to help journalists make connections and find data for their reports. In all of these developments and newly emerging roles, there are a few overarching trends: The importance of data, useful content, and relationships are on the rise. With these trends in mind, here are a few tips for interviewing today’s inbound marketer. And for those of you on the other side of the interview table, here’s how to get hired as an inbound marketer.What new roles have you added to your marketing team? What roles would you add if you had the capacity? Share with us in the comments.Image Credit: healthrx.com Marketing Jobs Originally published Nov 16, 2012 9:00:00 AM, updated October 20 2016 Topics:center_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack “Ch-ch-ch-ch-changes.” Could David Bowie’s 70s hit be a marketer’s theme song, or what?On a related — but arguably more serious — note, according to the 2012 CMO Survey by the American Marketing Association and Duke University, Marketing appears to be one of the early rebounders in the initial economic recovery. In terms of both department size and budget, Marketing is on the rise.Just take a look at how the size of business’ marketing departments has more than doubled — in fact, almost tripled — since August 2011 …last_img read more

30-Day Blog Challenge Tip #20: Talk to Sales and Support

first_img Hi 👋 What’s your name?First NameLast NameHi null, what’s your email address?Email AddressAnd your phone number?Phone NumberWhat is your company’s name and website?CompanyWebsiteHow many employees work there?1Does your company provide any of the following services?Web DesignOnline MarketingSEO/SEMAdvertising Agency ServicesYesNoGet Your Free Templates How to Write a Blog Post1. Understand your audience.Before you start to write your first blog post, have a clear understanding of your target audience. What do they want to know about? What will resonate with them? This is where creating your buyer personas comes in handy. Consider what you know about your buyer personas and their interests while you’re coming up with a topic for your blog post.For instance, if your readers are millennials looking to start their own business, you probably don’t need to provide them with information about getting started in social media — most of them already have that down. You might, however, want to give them information about how to adjust their approach to social media from a more casual, personal one to a more business-savvy, networking-focused approach. That kind of tweak is what separates you from blogging about generic stuff to the stuff your audience really wants (and needs) to hear.Don’t have buyer personas in place for your business? Here are a few resources to help you get started:Create Buyer Personas for Your Business [Free Template]Blog Post: How to Create Detailed Buyer Personas for Your BusinessMakeMyPersona.com [Free Tool] 2. Create your blog domain.Next, you’ll need a place to host this and every other blog post you write. This requires choosing a content management system (CMS) and a website domain hosting service.Sign Up With a Content Management SystemA CMS helps you create a website domain where you’ll actually publish your blog. The CMS platforms available for you to sign up for can manage domains, where you create your own website; and subdomains, where you create a webpage that connects with an existing website.HubSpot customers host their website content through HubSpot’s content management system. Another popular option is a self-hosted WordPress website on WP Engine. Whether they create a domain or a subdomain to start their blog, they’ll need to choose a web domain hosting service after choosing their CMS.This is true for every blogger seeking to start their own blog on their own website.Register a Domain or Subdomain With a Website HostYour own blog domain will look like this: www.yourblog.com. The name between the two periods is up to you, as long as this domain name doesn’t yet exist on the internet.Want to create a subdomain for your blog? If you already own a cooking business at www.yourcompany.com, you might create a blog that looks like this: blog.yourcompany.com. In other words, your blog’s subdomain will live in its own section of yourcompany.com.Some CMSs offer subdomains as a free service, where your blog lives on the CMS, rather than your business’s website. For example, it might look like “yourblog.contentmanagementsystem.com.” However, in order to create a subdomain that belongs to a company website, you’ll need to register this subdomain with a website host.Most website hosting services charge very little to host an original domain — in fact, website costs can be as inexpensive as $3 per month. Here are five popular web hosting services to choose from:GoDaddyHostGatorDreamHostBluehostiPage3. Customize your blog’s theme.Once you have your blog domain set up, customize the appearance of your blog to reflect the theme of the content you plan on creating.Are you writing about sustainability and the environment? Green might be a color to keep in mind when designing the look and feel of your blog, as green is often associated with sustainability.If you already manage a website, and are writing your first blog post for that website, it’s important that your blog is consistent with this existing website, both in appearance and subject matter. Two things to include right away are:Logo. This can be your name or your business’s logo, either one helping to remind your readers who or what is publishing this content. How heavily you want to brand this blog, in relation to your main brand, is up to you.”About” page. You might already have an “About” blurb describing yourself or your business. Your blog’s “About” section is an extension of this higher-level statement. Think of it as your blog’s mission statement, which serves to support your company’s goals.4. Identify your first blog post’s topic.Before you even write anything, you need to pick a topic for your blog post. The topic can be pretty general to start with. For example, if you’re a plumber, you might start out thinking you want to write about leaky faucets.Then, as you do your research, you can expand the topic to discuss how to fix a leaky faucet based on the various causes of a faucet leak.You might not want to jump right into a “how-to” article for your first blog post, though, and that’s okay. Perhaps you’d like to write about modern types of faucet setups, or tell one particular success story you had rescuing a faucet before it flooded someone’s house.If a plumber’s first how-to article is about how to fix a leaky faucet, for example, here are four other types of sample blog post ideas a plumber might start with, based on the five free blog templates we’ve offered to you:List-based Post: 5 ways to fix a leaky faucetCurated Collection Post: 10 faucet and sink brands you should look into todaySlideShare Presentation: 5 types of faucets that should replace your old one (with pictures)News post: New study shows X% of people don’t replace their faucet on timeFind more examples of blog posts at the end of this step-by-step guide.If you’re having trouble coming up with topic ideas, check out this blog post from my colleague Ginny Soskey. In this post, Soskey walks through a helpful process for turning one idea into many. Similar to the “leaky faucet” examples above, she suggests that you “iterate off old topics to come up with unique and compelling new topics.” This can be done by:Changing the topic scopeAdjusting the time frameChoosing a new audienceTaking a positive/negative approachIntroducing a new format5. Come up with a working title.Then you might come up with a few different working titles — in other words, iterations or different ways of approaching that topic to help you focus your writing. For example, you might decide to narrow your topic to “Tools for Fixing Leaky Faucets” or “Common Causes of Leaky Faucets.” A working title is specific and will guide your post so you can start writing.Let’s take a real post as an example: “How to Choose a Solid Topic for Your Next Blog Post.” Appropriate, right? The topic, in this case, was probably simply “blogging.” Then the working title may have been something like, “The Process for Selecting a Blog Post Topic.” And the final title ended up being “How to Choose a Solid Topic for Your Next Blog Post.”See that evolution from topic, to working title, to final title? Even though the working title may not end up being the final title (more on that in a moment), it still provides enough information so you can focus your blog post on something more specific than a generic, overwhelming topic.6. Write an intro (and make it captivating).We’ve written more specifically about writing captivating introductions in the post, “How to Write an Introduction,” but let’s review, shall we?First, grab the reader’s attention. If you lose the reader in the first few paragraphs — or even sentences — of the introduction, they will stop reading even before they’ve given your post a fair shake. You can do this in a number of ways: tell a story or a joke, be empathetic, or grip the reader with an interesting fact or statistic.Then describe the purpose of the post and explain how it will address a problem the reader may be having. This will give the reader a reason to keep reading and give them a connection to how it will help them improve their work/lives. Here’s an example of a post that we think does a good job of attracting a reader’s attention right away:7. Organize your content in an outline.Sometimes, blog posts can have an overwhelming amount of information — for the reader and the writer. The trick is to organize the info so readers are not intimidated by the length or amount of content. The organization can take multiple forms — sections, lists, tips, whatever’s most appropriate. But it must be organized!Let’s take a look at the post, “How to Use Snapchat: A Detailed Look Into HubSpot’s Snapchat Strategy.” There is a lot of content in this post, so we broke it into a few different sections using the following headers: How to Setup Your Snapchat Account, Snaps vs. Stories: What’s the Difference?, and How to Use Snapchat for Business. These sections are then separated into sub-sections that to go into more detail and also make the content easier to read.To complete this step, all you really need to do is outline your post. That way, before you start writing, you know which points you want to cover, and the best order in which to do it. To make things even easier, you can also download and use our free blog post templates, which are pre-organized for five of the most common blog post types. Just fill in the blanks!8. Write your blog post!The next step — but not the last — is actually writing the content. We couldn’t forget about that, of course.Now that you have your outline/template, you’re ready to fill in the blanks. Use your outline as a guide and be sure to expand on all of your points as needed. Write about what you already know, and if necessary, do additional research to gather more information, examples, and data to back up your points, providing proper attribution when incorporating external sources. Need help finding accurate and compelling data to use in your post? Check out this roundup of sources — from Pew Research to Google Trends.If you find you’re having trouble stringing sentences together, you’re not alone. Finding your “flow” can be really challenging for a lot of folks. Luckily, there are a ton of tools you can lean on to help you improve your writing. Here are a few to get you started:Power Thesaurus: Stuck on a word? Power Thesaurus is a crowdsourced tool that provides users with a ton of alternative word choices from a community of writers.ZenPen: If you’re having trouble staying focused, check out this distraction-free writing tool. ZenPen creates a minimalist “writing zone” that’s designed to help you get words down without having to fuss with formatting right away.Cliché Finder: Feeling like your writing might be coming off a little cheesy? Identify instances where you can be more specific using this handy cliché tool.For a complete list of tools for improving your writing skills, check out this post. And if you’re looking for more direction, the following resources are chock-full of valuable writing advice:The Marketer’s Pocket Guide to Writing Well [Free Ebook]How to Write Compelling Copy: 7 Tips for Writing Content That ConvertsHow to Write With Clarity: 9 Tips for Simplifying Your MessageThe Kurt Vonnegut Guide to Great Copywriting: 8 Rules That Apply to AnyoneYour Blog Posts Are Boring: 9 Tips for Making Your Writing More InterestingThe Beginner’s Guide to Starting a Successful Blog in 20199. Edit/proofread your post, and fix your formatting.You’re not quite done yet, but you’re close! The editing process is an important part of blogging — don’t overlook it. Ask a grammar-conscious co-worker to copy, edit, and proofread your post, and consider enlisting the help of The Ultimate Editing Checklist (or try using a free grammar checker, like the one developed by Grammarly). And if you’re looking to brush up on your own self-editing skills, turn to these helpful posts for some tips and tricks to get you started:Confessions of a HubSpot Editor: 11 Editing Tips From the TrenchesHow to Become a More Efficient Editor: 12 Ways to Speed Up the Editorial Process10 Simple Edits That’ll Instantly Improve Any Piece of WritingWhen you’re ready to check your formatting, keep the following advice in mind …Featured ImageMake sure you choose a visually appealing and relevant image for your post. As social networks treat content with images more prominently, visuals are now more responsible than ever for the success of your blog content in social media. In fact, it’s been shown that content with relevant images receives 94% more views than content without relevant images.For help selecting an image for your post, read “How to Select the Perfect Image for Your Next Blog Post” — and pay close attention to the section about copyright law.Visual AppearanceNo one likes an ugly blog post. And it’s not just pictures that make a post visually appealing — it’s the formatting and organization of the post, too.In a properly formatted and visually appealing blog post, you’ll notice that header and sub-headers are used to break up large blocks of text — and those headers are styled consistently. Here’s an example of what that looks like:Also, screenshots should always have a similar, defined border (see screenshot above for example) so they don’t appear as if they’re floating in space. And that style should stay consistent from post to post.Maintaining this consistency makes your content (and your brand) look more professional, and makes it easier on the eyes.Topics/TagsTags are specific, public-facing keywords that describe a post. They also allow readers to browse for more content in the same category on your blog. Refrain from adding a laundry list of tags to each post. Instead, put some thought into a tagging strategy. Think of tags as “topics” or “categories,” and choose 10-20 tags that represent all the main topics you want to cover on your blog. Then stick to those.10. Insert a call-to-action (CTA) at the end.At the end of every blog post, you should have a CTA that indicates what you want the reader to do next — subscribe to your blog, download an ebook, register for a webinar or event, read a related article, etc. Typically, you think about the CTA being beneficial for the marketer. Your visitors read your blog post, they click on the CTA, and eventually you generate a lead. But the CTA is also a valuable resource for the person reading your content — use your CTAs to offer more content similar to the subject of the post they just finished reading.In the blog post, “What to Post on Instagram: 18 Photo & Video Ideas to Spark Inspiration,” for instance, readers are given actionable ideas for creating valuable Instagram content. At the end of the post is a CTA referring readers to download a comprehensive guide on how to use Instagram for business:See how that’s a win-win for everyone? Readers who want to learn more have the opportunity to do so, and the business receives a lead they can nurture … who may even become a customer! Learn more about how to choose the right CTA for every blog post in this article. And check out this collection of clever CTAs to inspire your own efforts.11. Optimize for on-page SEO.After you finish writing, go back and optimize your post for search.Don’t obsess over how many keywords to include. If there are opportunities to incorporate keywords you’re targeting, and it won’t impact reader experience, do it. If you can make your URL shorter and more keyword-friendly, go for it. But don’t cram keywords or shoot for some arbitrary keyword density — Google’s smarter than that!Here’s a little reminder of what you can and should look for:Meta DescriptionMeta descriptions are the descriptions below the post’s page title on Google’s search results pages. They provide searchers with a short summary of the post before clicking into it. They are ideally between 150-160 characters and start with a verb, such as “Learn,” “Read,” or “Discover.” While meta descriptions no longer factor into Google’s keyword ranking algorithm, they do give searchers a snapshot of what they will get by reading the post and can help improve your clickthrough rate from search.Page Title and HeadersMost blogging software uses your post title as your page title, which is the most important on-page SEO element at your disposal. But if you’ve followed our formula so far, you should already have a working title that will naturally include keywords/phrases your target audience is interested in. Don’t over-complicate your title by trying to fit keywords where they don’t naturally belong. That said, if there are clear opportunities to add keywords you’re targeting to your post title and headers, feel free to take them. Also, try to keep your headlines short — ideally, under 65 characters — so they don’t get truncated in search engine results.Anchor TextAnchor text is the word or words that link to another page — either on your website or on another website. Carefully select which keywords you want to link to other pages on your site, because search engines take that into consideration when ranking your page for certain keywords.It’s also important to consider which pages you link to. Consider linking to pages that you want to rank well for that keyword. You could end up getting it to rank on Google’s first page of results instead of its second page, and that ain’t small potatoes.Mobile OptimizationWith mobile devices now accounting for nearly 2 out of every 3 minutes spent online, having a website that is responsive or designed for mobile has become more and more critical. In addition to making sure your website’s visitors (including your blog’s visitors) have the best experience possible, optimizing for mobile will score your website some SEO points.Back in 2015, Google made a change to its algorithm that now penalizes sites that aren’t mobile optimized. This month (May 2016), Google rolled out their second version of the mobile-friendly algorithm update — creating a sense of urgency for the folks that have yet to update their websites. To make sure your site is getting the maximum SEO benefit possible, check out this free guide: How to Make a Mobile-Friendly Website: SEO Tips for a Post-“Mobilegeddon” World.12. Pick a catchy title.Last but not least, it’s time to spruce up that working title of yours. Luckily, we have a simple formula for writing catchy titles that will grab the attention of your reader. Here’s what to consider:Start with your working title.As you start to edit your title, keep in mind that it’s important to keep the title accurate and clear.Then, work on making your title sexy — whether it’s through strong language, alliteration, or another literary tactic.If you can, optimize for SEO by sneaking some keywords in there (only if it’s natural, though!).Finally, see if you can shorten it at all. No one likes a long, overwhelming title — and remember, Google prefers 65 characters or fewer before it truncates it on its search engine results pages.If you’ve mastered the steps above, learn about some way to take your blog posts to the next level in this post. Want some real examples of blog posts? See what your first blog post can look like, below, based on the topic you choose and the audience you’re targeting.Blog Post ExamplesList-Based PostThought Leadership PostCurated Collection PostSlideshare PresentationNewsjacking PostInfographic PostHow-to Post Tell us a little about yourself below to gain access today: Free Templates: Originally published May 6, 2019 7:30:00 PM, updated October 25 2019 How to Write a Blog Postcenter_img Free Blog Post Templates 1. List-Based PostExample: 10 Fresh Ways to Get Better Results From Your Blog PostsList-based posts are sometimes called “listicles,” a mix of the words “list” and “article.” These are articles that deliver information in the form of a list. A listicle uses subheaders to break down the blog post into individual pieces, helping readers skim and digest your content more easily. According to ClearVoice, listicles are among the most shared types of content on social media across 14 industries.As you can see in the example from our blog, above, listicles can offer various tips and methods for solving a problem.2. Thought Leadership PostExample: What I Wish I Had Known Before Writing My First BookThought leadership blog posts allow you to indulge in your expertise on a particular subject matter and share firsthand knowledge with your readers. These pieces — which can be written in the first person, like the post by Joanna Penn, shown above — help you build trust with your audience so people take your blog seriously as you continue to write for it.3. Curated Collection PostExample: 8 Examples of Evolution in ActionCurated collections are a special type of listicle blog post (the first blog post example, described above). But rather than sharing tips or methods of doing something, this type of blog post shares a list of real examples that all have something in common, in order to prove a larger point. In the example post above, Listverse shares eight real examples of evolution in action among eight different animals — starting with the peppered moth.4. Slideshare PresentationExample: The HubSpot Culture CodeSlideshare is a presentation tool owned by the social network, LinkedIn, that helps publishers package a lot of information into easily shareable slides. Think of it like a PowerPoint, but for the web. With this in mind, Slideshare blog posts help you promote your Slideshare so that it can generate a steady stream of visitors.Unlike blogs, Slideshare decks don’t often rank well on search engines, so they need a platform for getting their message out there to the people who are looking for it. By embedding and summarizing your Slideshare on a blog post, you can share a great deal of information and give it a chance to rank on Google at the same time.Need some Slideshare ideas? In the example above, we turned our company’s “Culture Code” into a Slideshare presentation that anyone can look through and take lessons from, and promoted it through a blog post.5. Newsjacking PostExample: Ivy Goes Mobile With New App for Designers”Newsjacking” is a nickname for “hijacking” your blog to break important news related to your industry. Therefore, the newsjack post is a type of article whose sole purpose is to garner consumers’ attention and, while offering them timeless professional advice, also prove your blog to be a trusted resource for learning about the big things that happen in your industry.The newsjack example above was published by Houzz, a home decor merchant and interior design resource, about a new mobile app that launched just for interior designers. Houzz didn’t launch the app, but the news of its launching is no less important to Houzz’s audience.6. Infographic PostExample: The Key Benefits of Studying Online [Infographic]The infographic post serves a similar purpose as the Slideshare post — the fourth example, explained above — in that it conveys information for which plain blog copy might not be the best format. For example, when you’re looking to share a lot of statistical information (without boring or confusing your readers), building this data into a well-designed, even fun-looking infographic can help keep your readers engaged with your content. It also helps readers remember the information long after they leave your website.7. How-to PostExample: How to Write a Blog Post: A Step-by-Step GuideFor our last example, you need not look any further than the blog post you’re reading right now! How-to guides like this one help solve a problem for your readers. They’re like a cookbook for your industry, walking your audience through a project step by step to improve their literacy on the subject. The more posts like this you create, the more equipped your readers will be to work with you and invest in the services you offer.Ready to blog? Don’t forget to download your six free blog post templates right here. Topics: You’ve probably heard how paramount blogging is to the success of your marketing. But it’s important that you learn how to start a blog and write blog posts for it so that each article supports your business.Without a blog, your SEO can tank, you’ll have nothing to promote in social media, you’ll have no clout with your leads and customers, and you’ll have fewer pages to put those valuable calls-to-action that generate inbound leads.So why, oh why, does almost every marketer I talk to have a laundry list of excuses for why they can’t consistently blog?Maybe because, unless you’re one of the few people who actually like writing, business blogging kind of stinks. You have to find words, string them together into sentences … ugh, where do you even start?Download 6 Free Blog Post Templates NowWell my friend, the time for excuses is over.What Is a Blog?A blog is literally short for “web log.” Blogs began in the early 1990s as an online journal for individuals to publish thoughts and stories on their own website. Bloggers then share their blog posts with other internet users. Blog posts used to be much more personal to the writer or group of writers than they are today.Today, people and organizations of all walks of life manage blogs to share analyses, instruction, criticisms, and other observations of an industry in which they are a rising expert.After you read this post, there will be absolutely no reason you can’t blog every single day — and do it quickly. Not only am I about to provide you with a simple blog post formula to follow, but I’m also going to give you free templates for creating five different types of blog posts:The How-To PostThe List-Based PostThe Curated Collection PostThe SlideShare Presentation PostThe Newsjacking PostWith all this blogging how-to, literally anyone can blog as long as they truly know the subject matter they’re writing about. And since you’re an expert in your industry, there’s no longer any reason you can’t sit down every day and hammer out an excellent blog post.Want to learn how to apply blogging and other forms of content marketing to your business? Check out HubSpot Academy’s free content marketing training resource page. Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

11 Things You Didn’t Know You Were Doing Wrong on Twitter

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Are you trying to amass a large following on Twitter? Want to increase your engagement and have meaningful conversations? Or maybe even drive more traffic to your website?These are great goals to set for yourself, but there are some mistakes you might be making on Twitter that are likely hindering your efforts, and you’re not even aware of it.Making some of these mistakes might even lead to people UNFOLLOWING you. *Collective gasp of horror.*Here are eleven things you didn’t know you were doing wrong on Twitter — some of which may be why people are unfollowing you:Click here to access a free Twitter for Businesses kit.1) Tweeting Purely Self-Promotional ContentThere’s a lot of interesting content out there. Chances are, your followers are interested in more than just yours. And if all you do is tweet content about yourself, you’re going to bore your audience pretty quickly — especially if you tweet the same link over and over. It will be hard to grow a valuable following if you don’t share other unique content, retweet, and reply to others.2) Tweeting at People With Irrelevant LinksYou might think your latest blog post is the most brilliant article to be posted on the internet all month. Maybe it is. But it’s generally a bad idea to tweet at people using their @ handles with a link to your article. If there is a specific person you know would be interested in your content based on previous conversations you’ve had with them, that’s one thing. But to @ every person you follow in your industry and your city with a link will get you unfollowed faster than you can say “spam.”3) Retweeting Every Tweet That Mentions YouIf people are mentioning you and your content in their tweets, that’s great! You can thank them by replying to them or favoriting their tweets. But retweeting every tweet in which you’re mentioned makes you look like you’re trying to win a popularity contest. Just like blasting out self-promotional tweets, it will clutter your followers’ feeds with tweets about … you.4) Keeping Your Twitter Lists HiddenMost of the people I keep track of on Twitter are not people I follow — they’re people I’ve organized into various lists. In fact, sometimes when people follow me, I add them to a list instead of following them back, since I pay attention to lists more than my main Twitter stream. When you create a list on Twitter, you can choose to create a public or private list.Public list: Anyone you add to the list will receive a notification that you’ve added them to that list. Anyone can also find and follow your list, or add your list to their Tweetdeck as a column.Private list: It’s private to you. Nobody on that list will know that you’re following them. Nobody can find or follow the list you’ve curated.Some lists should remain private, e.g. lists you’ve created for groups of friends and/or family. But if you’ve created an industry or professional-related list, consider making it public. That way the people included in your lists may reciprocate or follow you, or not get offended that you didn’t “follow” them back, since they know you’re paying attention to them.5) Favoriting Every Tweet Someone TweetsYou don’t want people to think you’re a stalker, do you?It’s fine to be a super fan. There are certain people on Twitter that you admire and like to follow closely, and that’s great. Much like the “Like” button on Facebook, favoriting is an easy way to show appreciation for shared content on Twitter. But if you favorite every single tweet someone puts out there, they will notice — and not always in a good way. Worse yet, some people favorite every tweet someone is even mentioned in.I think sometimes people use software to automatically favorite these tweets, but either way, it’s super creepy and can get you unfollowed or even blocked.6) Griping or Complaining I am guilty of this sometimes. When I get frustrated about something, it’s easy to tweet out a short rant and feel like I’ve gotten something off my chest.Publicly spewing negativity is a bad idea. While there are some very nice people out there who will tweet at me with pictures of kittens and puppies, my follower count takes a small dip each time I rant about something. People don’t like to be surrounded by negative people. So try to avoid airing out your dirty laundry on Twitter and maintain a positive outlook — your followers will love you for it.7) Tweeting All Your Content for the Day at OnceYou might not have much time for Twitter. In fact, Twitter (and other social media responsibilities) might be your “morning coffee” activity, which means you spend 15 minutes responding to tweets, publishing new tweets, and sharing interesting content. But don’t forget to space things out! If you tweet five times in a row first thing in the morning, and that’s it for the day, your tweets will only be seen by people who happen to check Twitter around that time. Your tweets will be pushed too far down the stream for the afternoon crowd to see. You can use tools like Social Inbox to schedule your tweets throughout the day. This way, you can still get your Twitter tasks out of the way in the morning, but your account will be active throughout the day.8) OversharingThere are certain mundane details of your life that your Twitter followers probably don’t want to know about, including but not limited to problems you’re having with your wilted lettuce, how uncooperative your children are being in the grocery store, or how many hours of sleep you got last night. #nobodycaresSometimes it’s fine to share this kind of day-to-day life drama — it adds to your personality, makes you more relatable, and lets you connect with your audience. But if you only tweet this stuff … all the time … you won’t become a very influential person on Twitter (unless you’re already a celebrity). Oversharing could also mean tweeting too frequently. If you overwhelm your followers’ Twitter streams, they likely won’t follow you for long.9) Auto DMsThere are some services you can use to automatically send a direct message (DM) to a new follower. Sadly, some people still think using these services is a good idea. Upon polling Twitter to ask why people would unfollow someone, auto DM was the #1 most common response. Auto DMs are annoying, inauthentic, and make you seem like a bot or spammer.10) Being Rude to Other Twitter UsersI will never understand why people go out of their way to be mean or rude to strangers on Twitter, but it happens all the time. Maybe you’ve read articles saying the best way to gain a following is to be controversial. Or maybe you don’t realize you’re being rude.A good rule of thumb to follow: If you wouldn’t say something to someone’s face in real life, you shouldn’t say it to them on Twitter. The same etiquette should apply. For the most part, Twitter isn’t really anonymous. The people you’re rude to can see who you are. So for goodness sake, behave!11) Only RetweetingIf you like to retweet often, that’s great! You’re not being overly-self-promotional, and you’re contributing to the conversation. But there is the opposite extreme as well, and that’s ONLY retweeting other people’s tweets, especially if you don’t provide commentary of your own. If you want to be influential on Twitter, you need to contribute some original content, as well. Otherwise your followers might as well only follow the people you retweet, and not follow you.Want to share this post? Here are some ready-made tweets:Click to tweet: 11 Things You Didn’t Know You Were Doing Wrong On Twitter – http://hub.am/1hnPg3S by @DianaUrban at @HubSpotClick to tweet: 11 Things You Didn’t Know You Were Doing Wrong On Twitter – http://hub.am/1hnPg3S http://pic.twitter.com/wvx3f86dgvClick to tweet: Here are 11 things you might be doing wrong on Twitter… are you guilty of any? http://hub.am/1hnPg3SImage source: TweetBrander. Topics: Originally published Mar 27, 2014 8:11:00 AM, updated July 28 2017 Twitter Marketinglast_img read more

How BuzzFeed Makes Money: An Inside Look at Their Sales Process

first_img Inbound Sales (Marketing) Originally published Nov 11, 2014 12:00:00 PM, updated July 28 2017 Topics: This post originally appeared on the HubSpot Sales Blog. To read more content like this, subscribe to the Sales Blog.Chances are, you’re familiar with BuzzFeed as your go-to workday procrastination. The site has helped you figure out what city you should live in, normalized your struggles as a short/tall/blond/brunette/girl/boy, and alerted you to the latest and greatest viral video. But behind the playful content that thrives on shares is a serious business that thrives on what all businesses need — revenue. BuzzFeed’s sales team is made of approximately 50 reps nationwide who sell the value of the listicle to companies such as Target, Toyota, Starbucks, Disney, and Unilever day in and day out.How do they do it? I got on the phone with Blake Boznanski, sales director, to find out. In this Q&A, he talks about why content might be the future of advertising, keeping up with industry trends, and the social selling tactics he swears by.We’ve all read, shared, liked, or commented on a BuzzFeed article. But what exactly does BuzzFeed sell?We sell branded content that [acts as] ads. Our founder Jonah Peretti — the cofounder of Huffington Post — had BuzzFeed as kind of a side project initially. When he looked at the business side, he said we’re writing such great content that people are talking about and sharing that we want the advertising to be the same way. No one talks about, clicks on, or really engages with your typical ad, so how do we make it more engaging? It’s so easy to just run a banner, but we felt it would be more compelling to create content. So the content we create for a brand becomes the ad that’s run across BuzzFeed and the social web.What’s the sales process like?A lot of people are familiar with BuzzFeed from a consumer standpoint, but it’s a little different from an advertising standpoint. Because we’re not doing the standard banner, there’s more of an education aspect — here’s how we can get people to talk about your brand through word of mouth marketing and get engaged with it. Then we get into the art and science behind what BuzzFeed actually is and does. From the outside it looks simple — creating great content — but behind that we have a science about what works.So we walk through all that information with a client, and once they have sign off, then we start really collaborating with them. We don’t do a big sales push. It’s more of a conversation about content in general, and if they get content, then it’s a perfect play. If they don’t get it and they’re nowhere near starting or wanting to, we’ll take more of a back seat, and say ‘Here are things you should do whether it’s on BuzzFeed or not, and once you’re ready to work with us, let’s pick up that conversation again.’So how do you convey the value of branded content as opposed to more traditional advertising?I do it a couple of ways. When I talk to somebody who does the traditional online advertising, I ask them, ‘When was the last time you personally clicked on an ad banner?’ It’s usually crickets, so that’s kind of a telltale sign right there. Then I ask, ‘What’s the last advertisement you were so passionate about that you shared with a friend?’ And a lot of times people respond, ‘Well, I don’t really do that.’ That’s where I say, ‘That’s what we do — we want people to not just see an ad but engage with it and share it with their friends and colleagues.’We also have a very in-depth dashboard that shows the results of the branded content we work on, so we can show how many engagements a [piece] got, and how many times it was shared and from where. Once you see the data, then you can really tell the story because I think people are a little skeptical of content in general. We have a lot of case studies that show that if you create great content people are going to be more likely to want to work with your brand and buy your product. Does the structure of the sales process have an impact on the type of salespeople BuzzFeed hires?Absolutely. If someone has done all direct response advertising in the past, that’s a completely different skill set than what we’re looking for. That’s not to say that we wouldn’t hire somebody with that background, but it might be harder to transfer into what we’re selling.We’re more of that consultative, longer sales cycle. There are some brands that you have just one meeting and they’re on board but others are like ‘I kind of get it, but I need to sell this up the chain.’ So it’s a completely different type of sell and salesperson we’re looking at. We want to have somebody that is intellectually curious about what’s going on in the marketplace and how this type of marketing can help your brand. Primarily they’ve been in media sales, but it doesn’t necessarily have to be online media sales — we’ve hired people who have done print and television. But I think knowing the media industry is [important].Do you use social selling in your day to day? If so, how?If there’s a company I’m interested in, I do a ton of research. If it’s a cold email and I don’t have a relationship there, I want to be buttoned up and know about their business, so when they get something from me, they say, ‘Blake has really invested time and has some initial ideas on how BuzzFeed can help us.’ If I find people to reach out to, I’ll look at them on LinkedIn and see where they’ve worked before and if we have any common connections. I used to work at LinkedIn, so it’s a huge sales tool for me. Same thing on Twitter and Facebook if their profile is public, and I’ll also do a Google search to see if their name comes up in the news. I think the more information you go in with, the better conversation you’re going to have. Not knowing anything about the brand, the person, the product — that’s not going to help you drive business.And it takes a lot of time to do that. The amount of time I spend researching before I talk to somebody is immense and it’s tough because a lot of times you don’t get a response. [You might think] you wasted time, but, at the end of the day, you didn’t. You’re still very interested in the company, and if they come around eventually you have all this background information. Plus, I’m just curious about industries in general, so I like knowing what’s going on.What kind of information do you put into cold emails? Again, it depends on the company. If they’re doing something in the marketplace right now, or if I read they just launched a marketing program, or if I saw one of their execs was on a panel — it’s really different for each individual. But it’s really doing your homework to find out as much information about the company and the person as possible and then personalizing that message.Does BuzzFeed have a target customer persona? We don’t. We work with so many different types of customers — clients direct, PR agencies, creative agencies, social agencies — and then within the client there are all sorts of different groups. So we don’t have one standard set of people that we try to go after or typically see. Whatever group is looking to have a conversation with us, we’re happy to talk.So how do you tailor your message to those different audiences — PR, creative, social, direct?The thing is we don’t have a set presentation. When I go into meetings, I don’t even do a presentation anymore — I just talk to them about what BuzzFeed does in general, and show them some examples of what we’ve done with brands. I think that brings it more to life. So that doesn’t change, but obviously if I’m talking to someone from a PR agency, I may show some examples that we’ve worked directly with PR agencies on. Maybe if they’re in the automotive or food industry, we’ll show examples in regards to those. Also, a PR challenge is going to be different from a social challenge or a creative challenge, so we make sure we’re aligning with what they’re talking about and what we’re offering fits the needs of what they’re trying to do.A lot of sales today is keeping up with industry trends and helping clients spot problems they don’t even know they have. How do you stay up on the media industry?Any newsletters, any information that’s out there, I’m like a glutton for it. Because the more I know, the more it’s going to help me in the long run.I get a lot of emails [with updates] in the morning so I can digest what’s going on. If I don’t have time to read them, I have an articles folder that I’ll go back to. And I typically go through them every day at least just to see what’s going on across the brands — even if it’s someone I’ve never worked with. I just saw Honda Civic is doing a YouTube video that’s basically a splice of two videos — it’s unbelievable. I always want to be aware of what’s going on in the marketplace so when I have a conversation with somebody it’s not like I just know BuzzFeed and I just know their brand; I know everything that’s happening. Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

7 Steps to Documenting a Content Marketing Strategy That Works

first_img Content Marketing Strategy Topics: Originally published Apr 25, 2017 5:00:00 AM, updated April 25 2017 I already know what you’re thinking. You saw the words content marketing and strategy together in the headline and thought, “Oh, cool, another article telling me how important it is to have and actually write down my strategy — just what I need.”Don’t worry, that’s not what this is.You already know that having and documenting your strategy is important because you’ve probably read the same reports and case studies that my team and I have read. But there’s a pretty big difference between knowing you should do something and knowing how to do it — which might explain why 89 percent of B2B marketers use content, yet only 37 percent have documented strategies.The marketing team at Influence & Co. spent the last couple months of 2016 carefully researching, planning, and creating a content marketing strategy for this year. What follows is an exploration of exactly which elements our team determined a successful plan must include to drive results, empowering you to create your own documented content strategy.How to Document Your Content Marketing StrategyPart of what makes a documented strategy so powerful is that every person on your team — from your content creators to your senior-level directors and everyone in between — can see what, why, and how your company is communicating.This alignment makes it easier to get buy-in, crowdsource content, and pull employees into the distribution process, and it makes your efforts stronger because it extends your reach beyond the marketing team.For your strategy to be helpful to your whole company and not just your immediate marketing team members, it has to address a few major questions, like:Why are we utilizing content marketing as a strategy?Who are we trying to reach with our content?What are we hoping to accomplish?How does this fit into our overall marketing strategy?How will we measure success?If you start with these questions in mind, the actual pieces of your strategy should come easily. In fact, each of the following components of your strategy should help you clearly answer those questions, align your team, and hold you accountable. Here are seven key elements your content marketing strategy must include:1) Overall MissionBefore you get too far into the weeds, ask yourself, “What’s the real reason we’re investing in content?” And if the answer is anything close to “Well, we just know we should be doing content,” stop immediately and spend more time thinking about why you’re making this critical, valuable, and time-consuming investment in the first place.If you do have a well-thought-out answer, write it down. Are you preparing to use content so your marketing team can generate leads and attract new customers? Are you trying to build brand awareness and credibility?No matter your reason for investing in content marketing, it needs to take a prominent place at the beginning of your strategy; that overall mission will guide the rest of your document and keep your team on track when it’s time to execute.2) Target Audience PersonasYou may have included some general ideas about your audience members when you outlined your mission, and while that’s a helpful place to start, it’s not nearly detailed enough to start creating content for them.Before you craft any content or develop any distribution plan, you have to know who you’re trying to reach. You aren’t creating content for the general public, you’re creating it to attract specific individuals who can contribute to your company’s goals.You need to research and create detailed audience personas. If your personas inform the content you create, your content will do a much better job of speaking to the exact audience you’re targeting.3) Content Mix PlanOnce you know why you’re creating content and for whom, you can determine what type to create. Depending on what your marketing funnel looks like, you’ll need a couple different types: content that educates and engages prospects at the top of the funnel and encourages them to learn more, as well as content for the bottom of the funnel that answers very specific questions and addresses objections to working with you.That content can take any number of forms, from guest-contributed articles on online publications to blog posts, white papers, email campaigns, sales enablement materials, and more. What’s especially important here is thinking through the variety of earned, owned, and paid media you’ll need to keep prospects moving through this funnel.4) Content Creation ProcessYou could follow each of the above steps exactly and still fall flat on your face when it’s time to actually put pen to paper. Creating content of your own and turning your company leaders into content creators takes time and effort.So before you dig into executing your content plan, determine which processes, workflows, and resources make the most sense for your team. Perhaps taking advantage of content creation tools will make your job easier, or partnering with an agency to help may be a better solution.5) Editorial CalendarConsistency is key in content marketing. It’s your opportunity to build trust with your audience members, nurture them, and become a resource for them. Once you know what kinds of content you need to create, it’s time to develop a calendar or schedule to make sure you deliver.Your editorial calendar should detail how often you need to publish to keep your audience engaged and when you’ll distribute your published pieces. Mapping out your target deadlines for different pieces will keep your process on track.6) Distribution PlanDistribution is all about getting your content to the right people at the right time. That can mean publishing articles in publications your target audience members are already reading, using a paid distribution plan on social to attract readers to your white paper, or simply including your content in your email newsletters.Your distribution plan should be part of your documented strategy because knowing where and how you plan to distribute your content informs the type of content you create, how often you do it, and which processes you utilize. It’s a key part of your content marketing strategy, so don’t start executing the strategy until you’ve thought it through.7) ROI CalculatorRemember when you identified your overall mission at the beginning of this document? You need to identify from the beginning how you’re going to measure success with this campaign, and now’s your chance to match metrics to your goals to gauge how well your content is helping to achieve that mission.Set some benchmarks you want to hit concerning traffic to your website, leads generated, or opportunities created through content, and set up a plan for tracking this using anything from your own modest spreadsheets to a robust software package.If this documented strategy seems like a lot, that’s because it is. Nobody said that content marketing was simple, but it’s well worth the investment, especially when you set yourself up for success. And with these seven must-have elements detailed in your documented content strategy, your team will be off to a fantastic start. Don’t forget to share this post!last_img read more

Bodies of UP train mishap victims reach Durgapur

first_imgKolkata: Meena Supen (47) and her daughter Manisha Supen (19), who were travelling to Kota aboard the weekly Hazrat Nizamuddin-Thiruvananthapuram Central Superfast Express, died after they allegedly jumped off the moving train near Vrindavan in Uttar Pradesh to catch a thief who stole their handbag.Their bodies were brought to the Ranchi Colony area of Durgapur on Sunday, amidst tension among the local residents. A pal of gloom descended on the family members of the victims, who have accused the railways for the incident. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari PujaThey alleged that there were no RPF personnel, as a result of which the incident occurred. Meena was taking her daughter to Rajasthan’s Kota for admitting her to a medical coaching centre there. It was also alleged by a section of their neighbours that the mother was thrown out of the running train by the thief and the daughter jumped off after seeing her mother. The railway police in Uttar Pradesh have started a case in this regard and are probing the incident. Also Read – Bengal civic volunteer dies in road mishap on national highwayThe bodies reached Durgapur railway station at around 1 pm on Sunday. But the bodies were handed over to the family members after four hours, as the related documents did not reach the place. The family members of the victims alleged non-cooperation against the railway authorities. The local residents also demanded employment for a family member of the victims from the railways. The local MLA also reached the house of the victims and assured them of all possible help.last_img read more