‘Cool Hand’ Luke Hardy leads Del Norte to Big 5 win over Eureka Loggers

first_imgEureka >> In a league-opening showdown, the kid they call ‘Cool Hand’ was as cool as they come.Del Norte pitcher Luke Hardy wiggled his way out of several jams to earn a complete-game victory as the Warriors defeated the Eureka Loggers 5-3 on Wednesday at Bud Cloney Field in Eureka.“I was able to focus with my catcher, Cole [Harper], and hit my spots, that was key for me,” said Hardy, a junior right-hander who allowed three runs on 10 hits and stranded nine Eureka runners. “Keep the ball down …last_img read more

Evolutionists Manhandle Contrary Evidence to Support Darwinism

first_imgHow can one mangle evidence for no change or abrupt appearance in order to make a case for evolution? Darwinians do it all the time.There’s never a shortage of stories on evolution in the science news. It’s one of the most popular words you can find. Search on just “evol” in a week’s reports, and you will get dozens if not hundreds of hits. And among historical scientists, Charlie Darwin shows up incessantly, far more often than Newton or Galileo. Chuck is the god of the science subculture, worshiped because he made it possible to be an intellectually fool-filled atheist.And yet when you read articles and papers on evolution critically, the evidence evaporates. What you find are cases of non-evolution or devolution. Some deal with minor variations in organisms, which are not controversial to anyone, even young-earth creationists. Other articles have nothing to do with evolution at all, but Darwin gets pulled into them anyway. Even evidence for abrupt appearance of complex structures gets manhandled into support for evolution. What’s going on, if not ideology masquerading as science? Look at these recent examples. Some of them are downright silly.Gene Mutation Could Explain Humans’ High Risk of Heart Attack (The Scientist). Oh great; Darwin evolved heart attacks for us. “Between 2 million and 3 million years ago, humans lost the function of a gene called CMAH, one that remains active in other primates today….” It’s all downhill from there. Thanks, Chuck, for nothing. Call Michael Behe, author of Darwin Devolves; here’s more evidence for his database. Science Daily also promoted this tale that converts devolution into support for evolution.Humans aren’t designed to be happy (Medical Xpress). Design? Is this an ID article? Far from it. Evolution is the designer substitute in today’s DODO culture (Darwin-Only 2x). Presumably, according to this view, Thomas Jefferson put Americans on a futile pursuit of happiness. We actually evolved to be miserable survivors. Would you like some materialism with your Darwinism? Have it anyway.The fact that evolution has prioritised the development of a big frontal lobe in our brain (which gives us excellent executive and analytical abilities) over a natural ability to be happy, tells us a lot about nature’s priorities. Different geographical locations and circuits in the brain are each associated with certain neurological and intellectual functions, but happiness, being a mere construct with no neurological basis, cannot be found in the brain tissue.Studies show the influence of environment on the evolution of weeds (Phys.org). Got weeds in your lawn? Blame Charlie, the god of weeds. Would you like some climate change with your micro-evolution salad? Have it anyway.Adaptive evolution is likely common among weeds due to the combination of two factors: the strong selective pressures exerted by changes in climate and the unique characteristics of weed populations, including short lifecycles, strong dispersal abilities and ample genetic variation.Weed evolution is influenced by both the direct effects of climate change on the environment, as well as its many indirect effects, such as changing fire patterns, new crop introductions and altered herbicide effectiveness.Spawn of the triffid? Tiny organisms give us glimpse into complex evolutionary tale (Phys.org). Would you like some science fiction with your Darwinism? What’s the difference? “Two newly discovered organisms point to the existence of an ancient organism that resembled a tiny version of the lumbering, human-eating science fiction plants known as ‘triffids,’ according to research in Nature.” The evolutionary story is “complex” and “surprising,” but Darwin always wins.Evolution could explain why staying slim is so tough (Medical Xpress). Now you have another thing to blame on the Bearded Buddha. It’s not your fault that you’re fat. But why would he cause obesity? “New research suggests the answer lies far back in human evolution, with an anti-starvation mechanism that primes the body to store fat.” Why would not an anti-starvation “mechanism” be evidence for design? Can you blame evolution if you eat too much? Maybe you need to evolve some self-control.Why Haven’t All Primates Evolved into Humans? (Live Science). DODO reporter Grant Curry wants to pre-empt a common question among youth. His answer is that evolution changes things, except when it doesn’t. “The reason other primates aren’t evolving into humans is that they’re doing just fine,” his favorite Darwin apologist explains. Chimps are happy where they are. Why would they want to become like us? Remember, “Humans aren’t designed to be happy” (see above). The article also sings another common Darwin praise song, denying human exceptionalism. Maybe that’s why we’re so unhappy.In the eyes of scientists who study evolution, humans aren’t “more evolved” than other primates, and we certainly haven’t won the so-called evolutionary game. While extreme adaptability lets humans manipulate very different environments to meet our needs, that ability isn’t enough to put humans at the top of the evolutionary ladder.So there is a ladder? Who is on top? We know; it’s the fake evolved primates with the Yoda complex. Only they have the magic ingredient to unscramble all the contradictions and untangle all the logical fallacies: Darwin Flubber.Environment, not evolution, might underlie some human-ape differences (Phys.org). Yes, it might. Anything “might” be true. But even then, Darwin is guaranteed to win, just like dictators always win by a landslide. This article criticizes bad experiments that deny chimp exceptionalism.Hidden genetic variations power evolutionary leaps (Phys.org). Talk about faith! Knowing that macroevolutionary leaps are difficult to account for, this article argues that the potential for major changes might lie hidden in “cryptic variation” – mutations that hide in the genome without producing outwardly visible effects.Like a fat savings account, cryptic variation is a store of variation that becomes available in an emergency to fuel rapid evolutionary change critical to the survival of a lineage and useful for molecular biologists.Ignore those guys in the article tinkering with lab equipment. That’s just to distract from the magic act. With sleight of mind, they get you to think of the potential variation lying there, ready to explode into a grand Darwinian show! And now, introducing their first demonstration of evolution — the blind cave fish! The audience rises to its feet in the Darwin’s Got Talent theater.Strange bacteria hint at ancient origin of photosynthesis (Science Daily). With Tontological invocation, Dr Mark S. Gold begins the Darwin worship service. “Structures inside rare bacteria are similar to those that power photosynthesis in plants today, suggesting the process is older than assumed.” Assumed by whom? Did you assume that?The evolution of cyanobacteria is usually assumed to also be the first appearance of oxygenic photosynthesis, but the fact that H. modesticaldum contains a similar site means that the building blocks for oxygenic photosynthesis are likely much more ancient than thought, as old as photosynthesis itself, and therefore could have arisen much earlier in Earth’s history.Dr Cardona also suggests that this might mean oxygenic photosynthesis was not the product of a billion years of evolution from anoxygenic photosynthesis, but could have been a trait that evolved much sooner, if not first.Where’s the evolution? It was photosynthesis before (fully formed, earlier than thought), and it is photosynthesis now. You just witnessed evolutionists using intelligent design as evidence for Darwinism. This is confiscatory confibulation.How the pufferfish got its wacky spines (Science Daily). Today’s just-so story, children, will make the Bearded Buddha happy. He doesn’t really need evidence for natural selection acting on random variations, you see. He just likes to hear, no matter the subject, “It evolved.” He loves a good mystery story, and he smiles bigger when we put it in the Kipling form, “How the [blank] got its [blank].”Pufferfish are known for their strange and extreme skin ornaments, but how they came to possess the spiky skin structures known as spines has largely remained a mystery. Now, researchers have identified the genes responsible for the evolution and development of pufferfish spines in a study publishing July 25 in the journal iScience. Turns out, the process is pretty similar to how other vertebrates get their hair or feathers — and might have allowed the pufferfish to fill unique ecological niches.In Darwinism, “might” makes right. All you have to say is that such-and-such a gene might have allowed the organism to evolve, and Darwin can’t lose.There’s only so much of this your poor editor can take at a time. Support CEH so that he can afford headache pills. Maybe he needs heart attack pills to prevent what Darwin brought on us poor, unexceptional primates. He might feel better if you readers would laugh harder at Darwinists to shame them back into the philosophy of science classes they failed. (Visited 396 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

South African wine industry ‘optimistic’

first_img14 January 2013Following a few very tough years, the South African wine industry is optimistic on the back of record export levels, good prospects for this year’s harvest, the penetration of new markets, and growing praise from high-profile wine critics, says Wines of South Africa CEO Su Birch.South African wine exports for 2012 reached 417-million litres, 10-million litres more than the previous record of 407-million litres achieved in 2008 and a 17% increase on volumes in 2011, Birch said on Monday.“The record levels are the result of a more favourable currency, as well as the global shortage of wines, stemming from a significant drop in the recent harvests of competitor wine-producing nations in Europe, Latin America, Australia and New Zealand,” Birch said in a statement.Third-biggest crop forecastBirch said all indications were that this year’s local crop could be the third-biggest in recorded history. “This is assuming that good weather conditions continue, there is a speedy and peaceful resolution to the farmworker strikes, and harvests come in on time.“The anticipated crop size is despite a decrease in total plantings, thanks to one of the best winter seasons in the Western Cape for many years.”The South African Wine Industry & Information Systems (Sawis) has anticipated that the 2013 wine grape crop should amount to 1 384 357 tons.Bulk vs packaged exportsBirch said that while bulk (i.e. non-packaged) exports accounted for 59% of volumes in 2012, this was in line with a growing global trend. She explained that over the past decade, bulk wine exports from the major New World wine-producing countries had risen from around 20% to over half of wine volumes traded, against the background of protracted recessionary market conditions.“The reality we face also confronts Australia, Chile, Argentina and even New Zealand.”She said while packaged wines generally offered higher returns, local producers had been forced to accept that to compete globally, they had to provide what the mainstream markets wanted.“Obviously we would prefer the accent to be on packaged wines, from a reputational perspective for Brand South Africa, in terms of job retention in the packaging industry and also to maintain sustainable profit margins for producers. We are therefore greatly encouraged by the recent growth of packaged exports to North America, Japan, China, as well as several increasingly affluent African nations, all to regions where we have been increasing our marketing investment.”Praise from high-profile criticsShe said the industry had also been buoyed by the growing confidence in South Africa as a top wine-producing country among high-profile international critics, whose opinion carried great weight in the global wine business fraternity as well as with consumers.“Over the past few weeks we have had praise from the likes of Neal Martin, who reviews for Robert E Parker’s world-famous The Wine Advocate, and who has singled out South Africa as currently the most exciting New World wine country, as well as from Stephen Tanzer of the International Wine Cellar, the UK’s Oz Clarke, Tim Atkin MW and Sarah Ahmed and Germany’s Eckhard Supp.”Labour unrest in Western CapeBirch said that while the industry regretted the current labour unrest in the Western Cape, huge strides were being made to ensure decent working conditions on all wine-producing farms.“The local Fairtrade office has confirmed that South Africa now has the highest number of Fairtrade-accredited wineries worldwide, with 65% of Fairtrade wines sold globally coming from our country.”At the same time, Birch said, there was steadily growing support for the Wine and Agricultural Industry Ethical Trade Association (Wieta), with increasing numbers of producers subscribing to its code of good conduct. This was particularly after the international market reacted positively to last year’s launch of the Wieta ethical seal, a world-first that provides a guarantee of fair labour practices.“Wieta accreditation for rigorously audited fair labour conditions has accelerated since last year and with the increase in producer and worker training sessions scheduled, prior to auditing sessions, we expect many more labels to qualify during this year,” Birch said.Some of the South Africa’s biggest producers have already earned Wieta accreditation for their labels, including Distell, Spier, Fairview and Robertson Winery.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

What is the value of wheat straw?

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Wheat harvest will soon be underway; we often get questions about the nutrient value of straw. The nutrient value of wheat straw is influenced by several factors including weather, variety, and cultural practices. Thus, the most accurate values require sending a sample of the straw to an analytical laboratory. However, “book values” can be used to estimate the nutrient values of wheat straw.In previous newsletters, we reported that typically a ton of wheat straw would provide approximately 11 pounds of N, 3 pounds of P2O5, and 20 pounds of K2O. Michigan State University reports similar numbers for a ton of wheat straw: 13 pounds of N, 3.3 pounds of P2O5 and 23 pound of K2O. A 2013 analysis of wheat straw collected at the OARDC farm in Wooster contained 14-18 pounds of N, 3-4 pounds of P2O5, and 20-23 pounds of K2O. These values were across four wheat varieties and three spring nitrogen application rates (60, 90, and 120 lb N/acre). The 2013 values corresponded fairly well with the previously reported “book values.” Nitrogen values in 2013 were slightly greater than “book values” which may have been a result of wheat height/size. If plants are shorter/smaller, percentage nitrogen tends to be greater than taller/larger plants due to a dilution factor as the plant grows. Regardless, the 2013 analysis provides validity to the nutrient value of straw given in previous newsletters.The nitrogen in wheat straw will not immediately be available for plant uptake. The nitrogen will need to be converted by microorganisms to ammonium and nitrate (a process called “mineralization”). Once the nitrogen is in the ammonium and/or nitrate form, it is available for plant uptake. The rate of which mineralization occurs depends on the amount of carbon and nitrogen in the straw (C:N ratio). The USDA reports a C:N ratio of 80:1 for wheat straw which means there are 80 units of carbon for every unit of nitrogen. Mineralization rapidly occurs when the C:N ratio is ≤ 20:1. At a C:N ratio of 80:1, mineralization will be much slower. (For comparison, corn stover is reported to have a C:N ratio of 57:1.) Rate of mineralization is also influenced by soil moisture and temperature. Since mineralization is a microbial-driven process, mineralization will be slowed (halted) in the winter when temperatures are cold. Thus, no N credit is given for wheat straw since it is not known when the N will mineralize and become available to the following crop.Besides providing nutrients, straw has value as organic matter, but it is difficult to determine the dollar value for it. Removal of straw does lower soil potash levels. If straw was removed after heavy rainfall, some of the potash may have leached out of the straw, lowering the nutrient value of the straw. However, a soil test should be done to accurately estimate nutrient availability for future crops.last_img read more

Former judge to probe BHU violence

first_imgThe Banaras Hindu University on Tuesday formed a high-power inquiry committee headed by a retired judge to probe the incident of lathicharge on protesting students and arson in the campus, which left several students, journalists and policemen injured.Meanwhile, Varanasi Divisional Commissioner Nitin Gokarn in his probe report submitted to the government is said to have blamed the BHU administration for not handling the incident, particularly the complaint of the molestation victim, in a sensitive manner and indicted the varsity for not taking timely action. The report submitted to Chief Secretary Rajiv Kumar, however, has not been made public.Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath had ordered the Divisional Commissioner and Varanasi ADG Vishwajit Mahapatra to probe the incident that took place on Saturday night.Promises actionBHU Vice-Chancellor Girish Chandra Tripathi said an inquiry committee headed by retired Allahabad High Court judge Justice V.K. Dikshit had been formed to probe the incident. Mr. Tripathi said the committee would shed light on ‘all aspects’ of the incident. “Whatever the recommendations of the committee, the University will take action on it,” he said.He said he would comment on the commissioner’s report after reading it.Amid speculation that the government had ordered a judicial probe, Uttar Pradesh Cabinet Minister Shrikant Sharma said only two existing probes stood in the BHU case — one by the ADG-Divisional Commissioner and the other by the District Magistrate of Varanasi. Mr. Sharma, however, told The Hindu that the CM had taken a serious view of the BHU incident and “to prevent such incidents in future, he appealed to the vice-chancellors of universities in U.P. to establish communication with students and identify those involved in cases of eve-teasing and take action against them.”A fine arts student of the BHU was molested by bike riders while she was returning to her hostel on Thursday evening. The victim alleged that instead of helping her the security guards on campus blamed her for not walking carefully in the dark while the warden questioned her character.Angered by this, scores of students, girls and boys, gathered at the main gate of the BHU for a protest which turned violent on Saturday after police lathi-charged the protesters, who the administration claimed included ‘anti-social elements.’last_img read more