New York DEC Reaches Accord With Invasive Species Institute

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Image by the Chautauqua Lake & Watershed Management Alliance.ALBANY — In an effort to combat the influx of invasive species in New York, the Department of Environmental Conservation has reached an agreement to work with the New York Invasive Species Institute and Cornell University.The new partnerships with the New York Invasive Species Research Institute (NYISRI) and Cornell University to develop and support projects and research to help limit the spread of invasive species.“New York State recognizes the challenges we face preventing the spread of invasive species, particularly in light of our changing climate, changing habitats, and changing ecosystems,” said DEC Commissioner Basil Seggos. “With sustained support and investments through the Environmental Protection Fund, DEC’s invasive species program continues to be a national leader, and the work of Cornell and the New York Invasive Species Institute bolster and complement New York’s efforts to effectively manage invasive species.”Cornell University is the current host for the Invasive Species Research Institute. Nearly 50 scientific investigations about invasive species have been/are being conducted. Today’s announcement sustains the State’s ongoing collaboration with NYISRI to coordinate invasive species research and develop outreach efforts to conserve New York’s hemlock resources in the face of multiple threats, particularly the hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA), an invasive insect. Supported by the State’s Environmental Protection Fund with $3.5 million, the NYISRI five-year term agreement includes $2.5 million for invasive species projects; the agreement with Cornell University includes a two-year term with $1 million to support the New York Hemlock Initiative.The five-year project memorandum of understanding (MOU) will support key positions and services at NYISRI for focused work on identifying invasive species, education, outreach, and targeted control efforts. NYISRI performs many critical and innovative tasks in the field of invasive species research, including biological control of water chestnut (Trapa natans), swallow-wort (Cynanchum spp.), and japanese knotweed (Reynoutria spp.), as well as measuring success and associated metric development and coordinating invasive species research needs in New York State.New York is home to vast stands of eastern hemlock trees (Tsuga canadensis). These trees are threatened by the introduction of the invasive insect HWA and other environmental stressors. HWA is now a serious threat to the survival of hemlock in eastern forests. Funded through the MOU, Cornell’s New York Hemlock Initiative provides a critical service by developing methods to conserve hemlock, including the growth and release of several biological control agents and other fundamental survey, research, and trend analyses.The Hemlock Initiative includes collaboration with professional land managers, state and federal agencies, government officials, and concerned citizens to understand the issues and strategies for minimizing the impact of forest insect pests and non-native invasive insects, such as HWA. Research is now underway on the forest stand dynamics of invasive non-native forest pest impacts and implementation of biological control strategies for HWA. This initiative involves the completion of a statewide prioritization of hemlock stands, establishment and maintenance of hemlock nursery stock to host biocontrol agents, and the rearing, release, and monitoring of non-native predatory insects into the environment to reduce the severity and extent of HWA infestations in New York State and reduce or prevent hemlock mortality.Cornell University also houses the Sarkaria Arthropod Research Laboratory, a quarantine facility that provides research capacity for arthropods and experimentation on their biology and control. The facility houses exotic pest species and non-indigenous arthropods with the potential to serve as biological control agents of pests.The outcomes of these projects inform activities undertaken by DEC, NYISRI, New York’s eight Partnerships for Regional Invasive Species Management (PRISMs) and other partners.Additional areas of focus include:Water Chestnut Biological Control: Water chestnut, an aquatic invasive species, has had significant negative ecological and economic consequences. Conventional mechanical control of water chestnut is labor intensive and must be maintained in perpetuity. However, development of a biological control program offers hope for a cost-effective and ecologically sound alternative. Cornell University evaluated a potential biocontrol agent between 2002 and 2005. This contract will allow for the continuation of work initiated at Cornell University to test and implement a biocontrol program for water chestnut.Swallow-wort Biological Control: Swallow-wort is an aggressive invasive perennial plant that forms dense patches in a variety of habitats and which may have negative impacts on monarch butterfly populations. Current practices to control invasive swallow-worts include the application of herbicides and mechanical removal. These practices can have negative side effects. The pilot biological control project was initiated in New York State 2018. Maintaining the established Swallow-wort Biocontrol Research Collaborative supports rearing and releases of an approved biocontrol agent for swallow-worts.Japanese Knotweed Biological Control: Japanese knotweed is a perennial herb with shrub-like form grows 3-9′ and threatens riparian corridors, fens, springs, ravines, forests, and streamsides. This five-year agreement will renew efforts to locate and test additional biocontrol agents for Japanese knotweed using demographic and phylogenetic approaches.Dr. Bernd Blossey, Professor, Department of Natural Resources for NYISRI/Cornell University, said, “With the significant long-term funding provided by the DEC, we are enabled to continue important fundamental and applied work to help protect and restore New York’s biodiversity and ecosystems in collaboration with other scientists and land managers across the state.”Entomologist Mark Whitmore of Cornell University said, “State support for the New York State Hemlock Initiative has been crucial for our ability to develop a network of cooperators and management strategies, including biological controls, in response to the threat to our hemlocks posed by HWA. The rapid and coordinated response by DEC and private conservation organizations with the recent discovery of HWA in the Lake George area is a prime example of how education and planning can help save the magnificent hemlock forests of New York.”last_img read more

VB : SU prepares for Binghamton following coaching change

first_imgWhen Syracuse heads to Binghamton on Wednesday for a match with the Bearcats, the Orange will be doing so without Jing Pu at the helm for the first time since 1994.Pu, the longtime SU head coach, was relieved of his duties Monday after leading the Orange to 15 winning seasons in 16 years. But Kelly Morrisroe, who takes over as interim head coach, expects little to change for the team.‘My style won’t change,’ Morrisroe said. ‘We’re focusing on the team and not there to be a distraction. I think it’ll be a smooth transition with the girls. They’ve adjusted well to (interim associate head coach) Matt (Soderstrom) and I, and we’re looking forward to the next nine matches we have left.’Morrisroe will lead Syracuse for the remainder of the season as it aims to reach the Big East tournament. She starts her tenure in nonconference play when the Orange (13-8, 3-3 Big East) plays Binghamton (10-13, 2-4 America East) on Wednesday.The quick turnaround from the coaching change on Monday to the team’s game on Wednesday will leave little room for distractions. But Syracuse will prepare for that game as it has all season, expecting to earn a victory.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text‘It’s a little bit of a benefit for us just to get one match out of the way and just kind of see the new adjustments for the team,’ Morrisroe said. ‘We’re going to go down there at Binghamton — there’s some things that we’re going to talk to our girls today as far as game plan, and we’re going to accomplish that goal.’Still, Morrisroe insists there won’t be too many adjustments that have to be made. The interim head coach may have a different coaching style than the passive approach of the former head coach, but Morrisroe has been with the team since last spring and believes that will ease the transition.Though the obvious goal is avoiding distraction, players are still left with some obvious questions as to how things will change.Morrisroe hopes to keep things similar to how they were for the first 21 games of the season, but it was Pu, not Morrisroe, making the lineup decisions prior to every game.Senior Noemie Lefebvre knows that the personnel could have a new look Wednesday night.‘If different players are going to step on the court it’s always good to adjust when you’re playing a nonconference team,’ Lefebvre said. ‘It’s still important, but we’re going to be able to make more adjustments.’Morrisroe also gets the benefit of making her debut against a 10-13 team.The Bearcats have posted a .500 record against Big East teams so far this year and beat Providence two weeks ago. But the Orange does believe this is a game it should win.‘We’re still stronger than the team we’re going to be facing, so hopefully an easy win in three and just come back home,’ Lefebvre said.Under Pu, Syracuse always emphasized beating the New York state teams, and the Orange is in the middle of a double-digit winning streak against Binghamton. That emphasis is one thing Lefebvre said definitely won’t change with Pu’s departure.In addition to Wednesday’s match representing the transition from one coaching staff to another, it gives SU one last chance to prepare before the final stretch of Big East matches.‘It is nonconference, so we can adjust as a team and as a coaching staff, and I think it will just be good prep for this weekend,’ senior defensive specialist Ashley Williams said.Even with the turmoil, the goal for Syracuse remains qualifying for the Big East tournament. The match Wednesday won’t affect the team’s ability to do that based on the standings, but the adjustments that the Orange must make will be important to carry through when Big East play resumes Friday against Rutgers.For Morrisroe, having her team prepared for each match is her main goal as she takes over the program.‘My biggest focus now is to make sure the girls are playing at their peak every time we step on the court,’ Morrisroe said. ‘When we go into matches we’ve got to be playing at our best, especially when we get into Big East matches here.’dbwilson@syr.edu Published on October 18, 2011 at 12:00 pm Contact David: dbwilson@syr.edu | @DBWilson2 Commentscenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Amanda Nunes reacts to being called GOAT female fighter ahead of her UFC 245 fight

first_imgAlso Read | UFC: Francis Ngannou Reveals He Is Feeling Low, Might Quit UFC In Near FutureAmanda Nunes (champion):- Age: 31. Height: 5’8”. Reach: 69”. Stance: Orthodox. MMA record: 18-4.Germaine de Randamie (challenger):- Age: 35. Height: 5’9”. Reach: 71”. Stance: Orthodox. MMA record: 9-3 WATCH US LIVE Also Read | Colby Covington Makes Special Trump Tower Visit Before UFC 245 Fight, Promises To WinAlso Read | Jorge Masvidal Expresses Shocking Retirement Plans, Vows To Win Real UFC Title Who would have thought that a female fighter would infuse fear among all her opponents? Well, even if no one thought of that, Amanda ‘Lioness’ Nunes surely did. The Brazilian double champion has swept away all the top-rated women of UFC. She is set to defend her bantamweight title for one more time against Germaine de Randamie at UFC 245. No wonder, there have been numerous greats in the sport of MMA who have already stated that Amanda Nunes is the greatest among them. So what does Amanda Nunes feel about it?Also Read | Miesha Tate Gives Former Rival Amanda Nunes ‘G.O.A.T’ RecognitionUFC: Amanda Nunes reacts about being the G.O.ATThe two-division champion of UFC has already got her hands on Ronda Rousey, Holly Holm, Cris Cyborg, Miesha Tate and Valentina Shevchenko (2x) among others. She is definitely a legend and her former rival Miesha Tate has already acknowledged Amanda Nunes as the greatest female fighter of all time. Amanda Nunes is clearly happy about getting the tag. She said that she wanted to be the greatest since day one of her career.In an interview with the American media, Amanda Nunes said that being the greatest female fighter is everything for her. “This is my life. This is what I dreamed about. This is something I’ve wanted my whole career and have been working towards for my whole career,” said Amanda ‘Lioness’ Nunes. Despite being one of the best in the business, Amanda Nunes is still hungry for more fights and considers Germaine de Randamie as a tough competitor in her upcoming fight.  Written By SUBSCRIBE TO US First Published: 12th December, 2019 17:59 ISTcenter_img Raj Sarkar COMMENT Last Updated: 12th December, 2019 17:59 IST Amanda Nunes Reacts To Being Called GOAT Female Fighter Ahead Of Her UFC 245 Fight Amanda Nunes has often been tagged as the greatest female fighter of all time. The Brazilian has finally reacted to it with UFC 245 ahead. Know more about it. LIVE TV FOLLOW USlast_img read more

Baltimore Protesters Take Down, Dump Columbus Statue into Harbor

first_imgProtesters who have been mobilized recently by the death of George Floyd at the hands of police have called for the removal of statues of Columbus, as well as Confederate figures and others.They believe the Italian explorer is responsible for the genocide and exploitation of native peoples in the Americas.According to The Baltimore Sun, the statue, which was owned by the city, was dedicated in 1984 by former Mayor William Donald Schaefer and President Ronald Reagan.Statues of Columbus have also been toppled or vandalized in Miami; Richmond, Virginia; St. Paul, Minnesota; and Boston, where one was decapitated.After throwing the status into the water on Saturday, the protesters reportedly moved on to Ouzo Bay Restaurant, a restaurant where a customer stated that her 9-year old Black son was denied service on June 22. Baltimore protesters pulled down a statue of Christopher Columbus and thew it into the city’s Inner Harbor on Saturday, according to officials.Demonstrators used ropes to take down the monument in the city’s Little Italy neighborhood.Baltimore Police stated, “we have no new updates to provide at this time.”However, in a statement, Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan said on Twitter:Today I issued the following statement on events in Baltimore City. City leaders need to regain control of their own streets and immediately start making them safer. pic.twitter.com/lnCAxjKvAG— Governor Larry Hogan (@GovLarryHogan) July 5, 2020last_img read more

Saint Martin’s Harvie Social Justice Lecture Features Award-Winning Historian

first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0 Saint Martin’s University is an independent four-year, coeducational university located on a wooded campus of more than 300 acres in Lacey, Washington. Established in 1895 by the Catholic Order of Saint Benedict, the University is one of 14 Benedictine colleges and universities in the United States and Canada, and the only one west of the Rocky Mountains. Saint Martin’s University prepares students for successful lives through its 23 majors and seven graduate programs spanning the liberal arts, business, education, nursing and engineering. Saint Martin’s welcomes more than 1,100 undergraduate students and 400 graduate students from many ethnic and religious backgrounds to its Lacey campus, and 300 more undergraduate students to its extension campuses located at Joint Base Lewis-McChord and Centralia College. Visit the Saint Martin’s University website at www.stmartin.edu. Submitted by Saint Martin’s UniversityDrawing on Martin Luther King Jr.’s writings and speeches, Michal Honey, Ph.D., will engage the Saint Martin’s community in a discussion exploring new directions to take in the wake of the 2012 elections. Honey’s lecture, “Post-Election 2012: Revisiting Martin Luther King’s Unfinished Agenda,” is the next event in the 2012-13 Robert A. Harvie Social Justice Lecture Series. The lecture will take place at 4 p.m., Friday, Nov. 9, in Harned Hall, room 110, on the Saint Martin’s University campus, 5000 Abbey Way SE. The free event, followed by a book signing and social hour with the author, is open to the public.A former civil rights and civil liberties organizer in the 1970s, Honey holds the Fred T. and Dorothy G. Haley Endowed Professorship in the Humanities at the University of Washington, Tacoma and previously held the university system’s Harry Bridges Chair of Labor Studies. He authored Going Down Jericho Road: The Memphis Strike, Martin Luther King’s Last Campaign, and other books of labor and civil rights history. His Black Workers Remember: An Oral History of Segregation, Unionism, and the Freedom Struggle (1999) received an award from the Southern Historical Association (SHA), among others, and his Southern Labor and Black Civil Rights: Organizing Memphis Workers (1993) won SHA and Organization of American Historian awards. In 1985 Honey won the OAH’s Charles Thomson Prize for his article on white Unionist resistance to the Confederacy. His talks are well known for taking a critical perspective on the past and present, using narrative, images, and song.The Robert A. Harvie Social Justice Lecture Series, now in its seventh year, was created by Saint Martin’s University Associate Professor of Criminal Justice Robert Hauhart, Ph.D., J.D., chair of the University’s Department of Society and Social Justice, to raise awareness of social justice issues within the community and to honor the work of Robert A. Harvie, J.D., former professor and chair of the Department of Criminal Justice at Saint Martin’s.last_img read more