Champions again! – Calabar (287.5), Edwin Allen (329.5) retain titles

first_imgAt 3 p.m yesterday, Calabar High were half of a point behind Kingston College in the race for the Mortimer Geddes trophy. An hour later, the defending champions took over and strangled the life out of their rivals’ challenges in a show of confidence and efficiency, as they powered to their fifth straight and 28th hold on the ISSA/GraceKennedy Boys and Girls’ Championships title. In a 4x400m finale that many had dreamed to witness, Calabar’s Christopher Taylor underlined the title when he anchored his team to the win in 3:09.77 in a blockbuster showdown with KC’s Akeem Bloomfield, who stormed around to the front only to see Taylor outsprint him in the final 100m. KC was timed at 3:10.26 with JC taking third in 3:15.06. Bloomfield, who had to make up a 30m deficit was unofficially clocked at 44.5 seconds on his leg, with Taylor timed at 45.3 seconds. Calabar closed their account on 287.5 points to KC’s 250 with JC ending on 227.5. St Jago were fourth on 175 points, ahead of fifth placed St Elizabeth Technical (100 points) As expected, Edwin Allen formalised their third straight girls’ title, with a comfortable win to continue the Frankfield machine’s growing dynasty with 329.5. Hydel was second on 263; St Jago (241.5); Holmwood (184); Vere (139); Excelsior (80) round out the top spots. Powered by champion girl Junelle Bromfield, St Elizabeth Technical (STETHS) finished with 72 points in seventh. In the Class 2 boys 400m final, Taylor, having already covered the field with 100m to go, looked left; then right before jogging to the line in 47.76, while waving his arms, encouraging his team-mate Brandon Heath, 48.03, to the finish line as Calabar secured a big 16 points. Munro’s Romel Plummer, 48.43 was third. The Calabar titan was again at the front of a one-two finish for his school when he returned to win the 200m title in 22.14 ahead of team-mate Dejour Russell, 21.38 and St Jago’s Gary Gordon, 22.09. In the Class 1 girls 200m final, Holmwood’s Ashley Williams, 24.02 pulled away to win ahead of Green Island’s Kimone Hines, 24.35 and St Jago’s Shanice Reid, 24.42. KC has a special 400m talent of their own and in one of the most predictable results of the day, Akeem Bloomfield manhandled the Class 1 boys 400m field even if his 46.12 was expectedly not as shiny as last year’s 44.93 bomb. St Kago’s Collin Sewell, 47.51 was next best with Calabar’s Aykeeme Francis, 47.66, third. Bromfield, the Class 1 1500m champion, was powerful over the last 100m, as her long legs pushed her to a world junior leading 51.74 win in the Class 1 girls 400m with Holmwood’s Ashley Williams, 52.87, who led up to 250m, coming in second ahead of Petersfield’s Segale Brown, 54.19. She would make it three individual gold medals with an equally impressive win in the 800m, stopping the clock at 2:09.70, with Janiel Moore, 2:15.47 and her Edwin Allen team-mate Asshani Robb, 2:16.73 taking second and third respectively. KC’s Shanthamoi Brown, 50.07 obliged in the Class 3 boys 400m final with a comfortable win over Munro’s Devante Heywood, 50.92, and Daniel Binns (Herbert Morrison), 51.48. The afternoon belonged to Calabar and Seanie Selvin, 14.05 and Tyrone Bryan’s, 14.16, quinella in the Class 1 boys 110m hurdles summed up their mood. JC’s Phillip Lemonios, 14.33 was third. Dejour Russell (Calabar) matched Michael O’Hara’s 13.45 Class 2 boys 110m hurdles record (2013) as he won ahead of Oquendo Bernard (JC), 14.18 and another Calabar man, Orlando Bennett, 14.22. KC’s Davion Williams, 13.62 win the Class 3 boys 100m hurdles event and took his celebration to the KC supporters in the stands. Calabar’s Schavon Carr, 13.89 was second with Warren Henlon (STETHS), 13.94 next best.  Janell Fullerton (St Jago) broke the Class 1 girls shot put record (14.27m), dropping a 14.39m mark to win ahead of Tavia Dixon (Excelsior) 13.61m and Sahjay Stevens (STETHS), 13.17m. St Jago’s Keenan Lawrence, 1:54.84, who broke the 1500m record on Friday also won the Class 2 boys 800m title ahead of Anthony Cox, 1:56.60, also of St Jago and JC’s Dugion Blackman, 1:56.65. In a big upset, the little fancied Nathan Brown (Excelsior), 1:55.21, outlasted St Jago’s Leon Clarke, 1:55.43 and STETHS’ Jauavney James, 1:55.44 in a close Class 1 boys 800m. Calabar secured the two top spots in the Class 1 boys shot put with Kyle Mitchell, 19.27m winning ahead of Warren Barrett Jr, 19.08m and Vashon McCarthy (JC), 18.14m.last_img read more

Evolutionists Manhandle Contrary Evidence to Support Darwinism

first_imgHow can one mangle evidence for no change or abrupt appearance in order to make a case for evolution? Darwinians do it all the time.There’s never a shortage of stories on evolution in the science news. It’s one of the most popular words you can find. Search on just “evol” in a week’s reports, and you will get dozens if not hundreds of hits. And among historical scientists, Charlie Darwin shows up incessantly, far more often than Newton or Galileo. Chuck is the god of the science subculture, worshiped because he made it possible to be an intellectually fool-filled atheist.And yet when you read articles and papers on evolution critically, the evidence evaporates. What you find are cases of non-evolution or devolution. Some deal with minor variations in organisms, which are not controversial to anyone, even young-earth creationists. Other articles have nothing to do with evolution at all, but Darwin gets pulled into them anyway. Even evidence for abrupt appearance of complex structures gets manhandled into support for evolution. What’s going on, if not ideology masquerading as science? Look at these recent examples. Some of them are downright silly.Gene Mutation Could Explain Humans’ High Risk of Heart Attack (The Scientist). Oh great; Darwin evolved heart attacks for us. “Between 2 million and 3 million years ago, humans lost the function of a gene called CMAH, one that remains active in other primates today….” It’s all downhill from there. Thanks, Chuck, for nothing. Call Michael Behe, author of Darwin Devolves; here’s more evidence for his database. Science Daily also promoted this tale that converts devolution into support for evolution.Humans aren’t designed to be happy (Medical Xpress). Design? Is this an ID article? Far from it. Evolution is the designer substitute in today’s DODO culture (Darwin-Only 2x). Presumably, according to this view, Thomas Jefferson put Americans on a futile pursuit of happiness. We actually evolved to be miserable survivors. Would you like some materialism with your Darwinism? Have it anyway.The fact that evolution has prioritised the development of a big frontal lobe in our brain (which gives us excellent executive and analytical abilities) over a natural ability to be happy, tells us a lot about nature’s priorities. Different geographical locations and circuits in the brain are each associated with certain neurological and intellectual functions, but happiness, being a mere construct with no neurological basis, cannot be found in the brain tissue.Studies show the influence of environment on the evolution of weeds (Phys.org). Got weeds in your lawn? Blame Charlie, the god of weeds. Would you like some climate change with your micro-evolution salad? Have it anyway.Adaptive evolution is likely common among weeds due to the combination of two factors: the strong selective pressures exerted by changes in climate and the unique characteristics of weed populations, including short lifecycles, strong dispersal abilities and ample genetic variation.Weed evolution is influenced by both the direct effects of climate change on the environment, as well as its many indirect effects, such as changing fire patterns, new crop introductions and altered herbicide effectiveness.Spawn of the triffid? Tiny organisms give us glimpse into complex evolutionary tale (Phys.org). Would you like some science fiction with your Darwinism? What’s the difference? “Two newly discovered organisms point to the existence of an ancient organism that resembled a tiny version of the lumbering, human-eating science fiction plants known as ‘triffids,’ according to research in Nature.” The evolutionary story is “complex” and “surprising,” but Darwin always wins.Evolution could explain why staying slim is so tough (Medical Xpress). Now you have another thing to blame on the Bearded Buddha. It’s not your fault that you’re fat. But why would he cause obesity? “New research suggests the answer lies far back in human evolution, with an anti-starvation mechanism that primes the body to store fat.” Why would not an anti-starvation “mechanism” be evidence for design? Can you blame evolution if you eat too much? Maybe you need to evolve some self-control.Why Haven’t All Primates Evolved into Humans? (Live Science). DODO reporter Grant Curry wants to pre-empt a common question among youth. His answer is that evolution changes things, except when it doesn’t. “The reason other primates aren’t evolving into humans is that they’re doing just fine,” his favorite Darwin apologist explains. Chimps are happy where they are. Why would they want to become like us? Remember, “Humans aren’t designed to be happy” (see above). The article also sings another common Darwin praise song, denying human exceptionalism. Maybe that’s why we’re so unhappy.In the eyes of scientists who study evolution, humans aren’t “more evolved” than other primates, and we certainly haven’t won the so-called evolutionary game. While extreme adaptability lets humans manipulate very different environments to meet our needs, that ability isn’t enough to put humans at the top of the evolutionary ladder.So there is a ladder? Who is on top? We know; it’s the fake evolved primates with the Yoda complex. Only they have the magic ingredient to unscramble all the contradictions and untangle all the logical fallacies: Darwin Flubber.Environment, not evolution, might underlie some human-ape differences (Phys.org). Yes, it might. Anything “might” be true. But even then, Darwin is guaranteed to win, just like dictators always win by a landslide. This article criticizes bad experiments that deny chimp exceptionalism.Hidden genetic variations power evolutionary leaps (Phys.org). Talk about faith! Knowing that macroevolutionary leaps are difficult to account for, this article argues that the potential for major changes might lie hidden in “cryptic variation” – mutations that hide in the genome without producing outwardly visible effects.Like a fat savings account, cryptic variation is a store of variation that becomes available in an emergency to fuel rapid evolutionary change critical to the survival of a lineage and useful for molecular biologists.Ignore those guys in the article tinkering with lab equipment. That’s just to distract from the magic act. With sleight of mind, they get you to think of the potential variation lying there, ready to explode into a grand Darwinian show! And now, introducing their first demonstration of evolution — the blind cave fish! The audience rises to its feet in the Darwin’s Got Talent theater.Strange bacteria hint at ancient origin of photosynthesis (Science Daily). With Tontological invocation, Dr Mark S. Gold begins the Darwin worship service. “Structures inside rare bacteria are similar to those that power photosynthesis in plants today, suggesting the process is older than assumed.” Assumed by whom? Did you assume that?The evolution of cyanobacteria is usually assumed to also be the first appearance of oxygenic photosynthesis, but the fact that H. modesticaldum contains a similar site means that the building blocks for oxygenic photosynthesis are likely much more ancient than thought, as old as photosynthesis itself, and therefore could have arisen much earlier in Earth’s history.Dr Cardona also suggests that this might mean oxygenic photosynthesis was not the product of a billion years of evolution from anoxygenic photosynthesis, but could have been a trait that evolved much sooner, if not first.Where’s the evolution? It was photosynthesis before (fully formed, earlier than thought), and it is photosynthesis now. You just witnessed evolutionists using intelligent design as evidence for Darwinism. This is confiscatory confibulation.How the pufferfish got its wacky spines (Science Daily). Today’s just-so story, children, will make the Bearded Buddha happy. He doesn’t really need evidence for natural selection acting on random variations, you see. He just likes to hear, no matter the subject, “It evolved.” He loves a good mystery story, and he smiles bigger when we put it in the Kipling form, “How the [blank] got its [blank].”Pufferfish are known for their strange and extreme skin ornaments, but how they came to possess the spiky skin structures known as spines has largely remained a mystery. Now, researchers have identified the genes responsible for the evolution and development of pufferfish spines in a study publishing July 25 in the journal iScience. Turns out, the process is pretty similar to how other vertebrates get their hair or feathers — and might have allowed the pufferfish to fill unique ecological niches.In Darwinism, “might” makes right. All you have to say is that such-and-such a gene might have allowed the organism to evolve, and Darwin can’t lose.There’s only so much of this your poor editor can take at a time. Support CEH so that he can afford headache pills. Maybe he needs heart attack pills to prevent what Darwin brought on us poor, unexceptional primates. He might feel better if you readers would laugh harder at Darwinists to shame them back into the philosophy of science classes they failed. (Visited 396 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

7 Things to Know About Asana: Facebook Co-Founder’s Collaboration Startup

first_imgAsana is a company created by Facebook co-founder Dustin Moskovitz and ex-Googler Justin Rosenstein. Its aim is nothing short of reinventing how we collaborate. It’s a lofty goal, especially with so many Enterprise 2.0 tools aiming to do just that. But it has deep pockets, high profile advisers, a strong vision and lots of buzz.The team has been toiling on the project in secret for two years, but have finally started talking about it over the past few months. In February, the company held an open house where Rosenstein demoed and explained the product. It’s currently in private beta, but don’t hold your breath waiting for an invite.Here’s what you should know about the company and its product. Tags:#enterprise#saas Asana Open House from Jerry Phillips on Vimeo.Founders, AdvisorsAsana was co-founded by Dustin Moskovitz, a co-founder of Facebook, and Justin Rosenstein, who was a tech lead and engineering manager at Facebook and a product manager at Google.Asana advisors include Marc Andreessen, Ronald Conway, Adam D’Angelo, Ben Horowitz, Mitch Kapor and Peter Thiel. A full list can be found here.For Asana, Changing the Nature of Work Starts at HomeAsana doesn’t give its employees official job titles. For example, when it recently hired Kenny Van Zant the company announced he was joining the team in a “COO-type of role.”There’s a Huge Waiting List for Its BetaDespite its quirky organization structure, businesses are beating down the door to give Asana a try. According to TechCrunch, there is a 1,200-company waiting list to get a beta invite.At Its Core, It’s a GTD System for Both Individuals and GroupsBut what exactly is it? It can perhaps be best described as a task manager for both individuals and groups. Its heavily influenced by the “Getting Things Done” methodology of David Allen.In the presentation by Rosenstein, he explains that enterprise collaboration and project management systems typically fail because individuals don’t manage their task lists in them. Individuals use calendars, text editors, sticky notes, legal pads – whatever helps them be productive. They do this because those centralized enterprise project hubs don’t give individuals individuals good enough tools to manage their own tasks. Enterprise project management tools are slow, and don’t give a good view of an individuals tasks – especially the ones that aren’t assigned as part of a group project.To solve this, Asana is focused on making its product work well for individuals. Its goal is to make Asana faster for managing tasks than a text editor. To this end, it makes it easy to drag and drop tasks, provides lots of keyboard shortcuts and simple to delegate a task to someone else.For groups, Asana makes it easy to manage tasks between team members, provides an activity stream view for each task and lets users participate in discussions by e-mail.If you want more detail, and don’t want to watch Rosenstein’s presentation, check out his answer on Quora about what Asana is building.It can be used by individuals working aloneUnlike e-mail or a social network, Asana is useful on its own as a task manager. Having other users to collaborate with will create a network effect, but it can stand alone. This could be a driver of adoption because users will be able to use it productively immediately.The Company Built Its Own JavaScript Framework Called LunaIn order to make Asana as fast and responsive as the team wanted, they built their own JavaScript framework called Luna. Initially it was meant to be its own language called LunaScript, but the company eventually backed down on developing its own syntax. You can learn more on the company’s Luna page, and on thesetwo Quora threads on the subject.The Team Plans to Turn Asana Into a PlatformAsana wants to be a platform for almost anything you would need in the enterprise – meetings, applicant tracking, bug tracking, performance reviews, calendaring, discussions, etc. In the project management space, Asana is competing with SaaS providers like Huddle and Manymoon. But as a platform for enterprise applications, it may be competing more in the long term with Force.com, Microsoft SharePoint and the recently launched Podio (coverage). Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… IT + Project Management: A Love Affair 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now klint finley Related Posts Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of…last_img read more