Developer fast-tracks final release to meet demand from buyers

first_imgA SUCCESSFUL sellout of stage one in just eight weeks has prompted the early release of the final stage of the up-market The Tilbury residential development at Coomera.The $30 million 69-townhome project is being developed by Gold Coast-based Bos Property Group.Project director Steve Harrison attributed The Tilbury’s early success to the elevated nature of the site at 39 Old Coach Rd, plus a stunning recreation club and lap pool overlooking the Gold Coast.“There are very few remaining sites in the growth corridor between Nerang and Ormeau that offer skyline views of the Gold Coast,” he said. “The townhomes are also very reasonably priced from $389,400 and feature quality finishes.” Bos Property Group project has Gold Coast skyline views.More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach North9 hours ago02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa1 day agoAll designs have three bedrooms, some with an additional study, and there are two and three-bathroom configurations with a split-level option.Mr Harrison said the majority of buyers were local owner-occupiers but the project had also drawn interest from Sydney and southeast Queensland investors.“When Bos Property Group bought the site in 2011 it had DA approval for 144 retirement units,” he said. “But the group decided to build less than half this amount on up-market townhomes that would all have expansive views of the Gold Coast.” The Tilbury features an 18m resort pool, club lounge, barbecue, entertainment areas and landscaped gardens.It is close to Coomera Marine Precinct, the $1 billion Coomera Town Centre project, M1 Motorway, Coomera train station and the $50 million Coomera Square. Completion is expected in July.last_img read more

Key questions as Wimbledon faces postponement or cancellation

first_img Read Also: Victor Moses flees Milan for London amid covid-19 fears ‘Meghan Markle’s Wimbledon hair is a look she rarely wears’ or ‘Meghan Markle’s Wimbledon outfit draws backlash’ were particular diversions in 2019. Also into cold storage will go the dependable, ‘Game, sweat and match’, dusted off every time the sun drives up the temperatures in London. And farewell to the ‘gruntometer’, that notorious low-tech gadget employed by the red-tops to categorise the on-court Wimbledon shrieks and screams. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Loading… Promoted ContentWhy Do So Many Digital Assistants Have Feminine Names & Voices?The Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read MoreBest Car Manufacturers In The WorldWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?7 Universities Where Getting An Education Costs A Hefty Penny6 Interesting Ways To Make Money With A Drone10 Risky Jobs Some Women Do6 Extreme Facts About Hurricanes7 Most Asntonishing Train Stations In The World14 Hilarious Comics Made By Women You Need To Follow Right NowWhy Go Veg? 7 Reasons To Do This10 Of The Dirtiest Seas In The World The All England Club will hold an emergency meeting next week to discuss the possible postponement or even cancellation of Wimbledon in the light of the coronavirus pandemic. Wimbledon’s famous logo at the All England Club AFP Sport looks at the key questions facing the organisers of what is generally regarded as the world’s most prestigious tennis tournament. What are the options for Wimbledon this year? – Wimbledon, which is scheduled to take place from June 29 until July 12, has been staged every year in peace time since 1877, shelved only during the two world wars. However, the spread of the coronavirus has brought havoc to the 2020 global sports calendar. Tennis is at a standstill until June 7 with the entire European claycourt season already wiped out. Roland Garros, traditionally the season’s second Grand Slam of four, has been rescheduled from its traditional late May-early June slot to September 20-October 4. The grass court season is relatively short, five weeks for the leading events, so Wimbledon would appear to have time on their side. However, building and preparation work at the All England Club site in leafy south-west London takes two months to complete and is set to start at the end of April. There is also the issue of when the coronavirus will peak. By Thursday, there had been 170 fatalities in London alone with 578 nationwide. Around 9,500 people have been infected so far in the United Kingdom. Health is the top issue for an event which attracts not only the superstars of the sport, but also close to 500,000 spectators each year as well as 6,000 staff and around 3,200 accredited media. Why can’t the tournament be played later in the year? – A slot has opened up in the calendar after the postponement of the Tokyo Olympics until next year. However, Wimbledon organisers know that a postponement by a just fortnight to take advantage of that opening would solve little. It would also mean running into the build-up to the US hardcourt season, the precursor to the August-September US Open in New York. “At this time, based on the advice we have received from the public health authorities, the very short window available to us to stage The Championships due to the nature of our surface suggests that postponement is not without significant risk and difficulty. “Playing behind closed doors has been formally ruled out,” said a spokesman.center_img Two-time Wimbledon mixed doubles champion Jamie Murray said he appreciated the difficulties. “I don’t know how long they could push it back,” Murray, 34, told the BBC. “There’s a lot of other stakeholders, a lot of other tournaments to consider. Even things like daylight for the tournament. “Once the tournament gets put back, there’s less and less daylight.” What would be the financial implications of a cancelled Wimbledon? – The tournament is an annual money-spinner. For example, in the 2017-2018 fiscal year, it was reported that Wimbledon generated $336 million with a pre-tax profit of $52 million. Over 90 per cent of that was ploughed into British tennis. The BBC, which broadcasts Wimbledon, will have a two-week black hole if the event is called off. They reportedly shell out around $72 million a year for the rights. Who would be the losers of a cancelled Wimbledon? – As well as the purely sporting implications of a binned Wimbledon, Britain’s well-heeled would suffer a jolt to their busy summer social season. The Henley Royal Regatta on the River Thames, a feature since 1839, has already been cancelled. Wary eyes will now be cast towards June’s Royal Ascot, which has drawn British royalty and the cream of society since 1911. The British tabloids would also be stripped of their two-week Wimbledon headline bonanza and celebrity fix. Worries over daylight: Britain’s Jamie Murraylast_img read more

Shooting shift carries Wisconsin over Indiana, 69-58

first_imgWisconsin is a scary team when it shoots well. The Badgers are also a scary team when they shoot poorly. It’s just a different type of scary, one the Badgers can’t prefer.That polarization was on full force at the Kohl Center, defining the two halves of basketball between Wisconsin and Indiana Tuesday night. It wound up being strong enough in the Badgers’ favor during the second half to lead Wisconsin in its 69-58 victory over the Hoosiers.In doing so, it was another rendition displaying just how the Badgers (23-5, 10-5) win games at this point in the season. For Wisconsin, with an improved defense from the doldrums that garnered five losses in six games, winning games in February seems to depend almost directly on the Badgers’ shooting tendencies.Although it ended well for UW, it didn’t begin pretty. That ugly pole of horror was on display for the first 20 minutes as Wisconsin netted just 19 points — trailing Indiana’s 29 — on seven buckets for a first half rate of just 25.9 percent.The frustration could have prompted a furious Bo Ryan in the locker room, with his team down 10 to the unranked, struggling Hoosiers (15-12, 5-9).“The halftime talk had nothing to do with threats, violence, none of that,” Ryan said. “It was, ‘We know what we can do, we’ve just gotta do it.’”They did, and then some.With their most prevalent three-point shooter Ben Brust continuing to struggle in the first half, it was almost too perfect that his spark lit the fire under the lifeless Badgers.After missing all four attempts from beyond the arc in the first half, a trend of Brust bricks had swelled. Wisconsin’s sniper had made just one of his last 17 tries from distance over his last five halves of basketball.But then he made one.“I knew it was only a matter of time,” Brust said. “I knew it was going to start, so I was just like, ‘Can it just start now?’”Just 45 seconds after he hit the first one, Brust squared away and connected on another. Thoughts of that scoreless first half were far from the Kohl Center.No more than two-and-a-half minutes passed by before Brust hit his third triple of the second half. This one put Wisconsin up 41-38, a lead it would never surrender, largely because its shooting took off even stronger.“It was definitely good to get a couple to go down,” Brust said. “I think it ignited this team and just trickled down to everyone else … It just kind of got us going and opened things up.”Following Brust’s triad of triples, Wisconsin made six of its next nine shots, extending its lead to its highest point at 58-43, and just about everyone got involved.Sam Dekker and Bronson Koenig found a few layups before Josh Gasser and Traevon Jackson found three pointers. In sum, Wisconsin shot nearly 62 percent in the second half — going 13-for-21 from the field. After just a 1-for-10 performance from beyond the arc in the putrid first half, the Badgers made six of 11 threes in the final 20 minutes.When a team is clicking like the Badgers were in that second half, pressure was sure to increase for the visiting Hoosiers. An array of Badgers’ buckets can seemingly tighten the rim on the opposite end of the floor as Indiana tried to keep pace.Then as they rushed to get stops on the defensive end, Wisconsin’s end of the floor seemed a little more wide open each time. Their shooting percentage justly followed suit.“A lot of times you’re getting ready for one or two guys to be very good passers. Their whole team is,” Indiana coach Tom Crean said. “The bottom line is: They got some good looks because we were in rotation a little bit.“They got hot. The basket started looking pretty big for them.”Coupled with a defense that didn’t allow a single 30-point half — which they did twice when in losing fashion during the January game in Bloomington, Ind. — Wisconsin’s hot shooting now seems good enough to take them wherever they please.“When the ball goes through the hoop, it makes a lot of things easier,” Dekker said. “People think it’s some crazy magic that happened, but no. We made shots and made some plays … we just ran our plays and it worked.”last_img read more