Love your Mother Earth

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionAs you know, Mother Earth, Earth Day is today, April 22. On this day many of your children join together to celebrate you. We Earthlings engage with others in projects to clean up our litter and waste, to plant trees and flowers, and to care for our corner of this planet that we call home. There are so many ways to do this, so many opportunities. You must be very excited and heartened to see us being good stewards and kin to the rest of creation. On this day, we pay attention, we take responsibility, we look at the harm we have caused and we work together to heal some of these hurts. Then Monday will come. For many of us, awareness of this amazing web of life will fade away fast. We will return to our habits of wasting the resources that you provide for us. We will refuse to recycle. We will plunder and squander the habitats of our kin creatures. How can we begin to live in a way that makes every day your day?For us who live in Schenectady, a gift to you would be to recycle. In my neighborhood, I see very few recycling bins out on “trash day.” There is lots of garbage that will go into your belly, the Earth (you know, we call this the landfill). Your children need to see that recycling is so important, especially since our “landfills” are filling up and we will need more of your precious space to dump our stuff. We need to realize that one use throw-away products are so wasteful.Another gift to you would be to stop littering. I live near Central Park. The amount of trash that is tossed on the ground makes me cry. I can only imagine how you feel.So, dear Mother Earth, enjoy your special day. We can only hope and pray that more of the members of your human family will make everyday Earth Day.LINDA NEILSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:Schenectady High School senior class leaders look to salvage sense of normalcySchenectady’s Lucas Rodriguez forging his own path in dance, theater, musicMotorcyclist injured in Thursday afternoon Schenectady crashTroopers: Schenectady pair possessed heroin, crack cocaine in Orange County Thruway stopEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homeslast_img read more

NCAA: Arellano wins first game under Aban, trumps JRU

first_imgLATEST STORIES Allen Durham still determined to help Meralco win 1st PBA title Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Tim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown MOST READ Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Levi Dela Cruz led the Chiefs with 19 points while Michael Canete had a 10-point, 13-rebound double-double.Rence Alcoriza added 11 points to Arellano’s offense while Guilmer Dela Torre and Dariel Bayla had 10 points apiece.Leo Esguerra had 17 points and 10 rebounds for the Heavy Bombers while JR Aguilar had his own double-double of 12 points and 18 boards.ADVERTISEMENT Arellano University etched its first win under its new head coach after turning back Jose Rizal University, 86-70, in the NCAA Season 94 men’s basketball tournament Friday at Filoil Flying V Centre.ADVERTISEMENT Japeth Aguilar embraces role, gets rewarded with Finals MVP plum For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Sor Rungvisai, Diaz make weight for ONE middleweight title boutcenter_img Gov’t to employ 6,000 displaced by Taal Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. The Chiefs improved to a 5-10 card four games into the tenure of interim head coach Junjie Aban, who replaced Jerry Codiñera late September.Arellano, which stayed at the sixth spot, easily dispatched the bottom-dwelling Heavy Bombers going on a 25-7 start in the first quarter and never looking back.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back Chriss“I think we played good defense today and the players executed our game plan well,” said Aban in Filipino. “The players were tuned in even into the smallest of details.”“I told them that they clearly wanted this win.” Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Phivolcs: Slim probability of Taal Volcano caldera eruption Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award View commentslast_img read more

How Does China’s Growing Overseas Investment Affect Africa’s Forests? 5 Things to Know

first_img5) African logging bans are ineffective thus far.In order to increase the added value of forest exports and create more employment benefits for local people, a number of African countries, including Cameroon, Mozambique and Gabon, have introduced national bans or restrictions on the export of unprocessed logs in recent years.In practice, however, weak forest governance within these countries has rendered such bans ineffective. Despite log export bans, China is still importing a significant amount of logs from major African countries such as Mozambique. In other cases, Chinese companies shift their supply chains to different countries to continue sourcing logs. While Chinese log imports from Gabon have dropped significantly after the country enacted its log export ban in 2010, China has begun to import more logs from other countries including the Democratic Republic of Congo and Cameroon. Moving ForwardThe rapid growth of Chinese investment in African forests has significant implications for forest management—and the trends are going in the wrong direction. It’s up to governments and companies in both China and Africa to create more sustainable investment pathways. The Chinese government could establish laws and regulations to make sure the country is importing legally and sustainably sourced timber. Chinese companies could adopt more rigorous social and environmental safeguards for their overseas investments. And in Africa, governments could strengthen forest governance and law enforcement to make sure all forest managers operating in their countries are properly managing ecosystems for the good of the planet, people and the economy. EDITOR’S NOTE: 2/29/15: An earlier version of this post included a graph showing the value of logs imported by China and those exported by Mozambique. Upon further reflection, WRI’s experts realized that we would need quantity data rather than value data in order to accurately illustrate the thesis in section #5. We have since removed the graph and updated the post to link to other studies highlighting the ineffectiveness of log bans in some African nations. This post originally appeared in Quartz Africa.China’s investments in Africa have exploded in recent years, with outward foreign direct investment (OFDI) stock growing from $1 billion in 2004 to more than $30 billion in 2014. Investment in forests—particularly the timber sector—is no different. China’s overseas forest project investments grew from eight in 2007 to 84 in July of 2015. Today, Chinese forest investment can be found in 25 African countries.Yet in many cases this expanded investment has come at a cost to people and the planet. Five trends shine a light on the impact Chinese investments have had on Africa’s forests, and point to how both governments and companies should proceed in the future.1) Most African timber exports go to China. In the face of a growing demand for timber and tighter domestic forest protection laws, China has become the world’s largest importer and processor of logs, and a lot of them come from Africa. Around 75 percent of African timber exports are sent to China every year, according to the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED).2) Investments have mixed impacts on local communities and environment.The impact of Chinese forest-related investment in Africa varies significantly. On the one hand, research from the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) finds that Chinese forest investment can improve market access and increase income sources for local, small-scale operators in countries such as Zambia and Cameroon. On the other, IIED, Forest Trends, and CIFOR report negative impacts like low contribution to local employment, inferior labor practices, deforestation, and involvement in illegal logging and timber trade. These impacts also pose reputational risks for China’s government and companies in Africa. 3) Investment is mainly coming from harder-to-regulate small and medium enterprises.While large, state-owned enterprises (SOEs) are traditionally the main players in China’s overseas investment, privately owned small and medium enterprises (SMEs) are playing a larger role in the African forest sector. More than 80 percent of the Chinese companies that have invested in the African forest sector since 2007 have less than $10 million in registered capital. Several of these SMEs have reported that they do not receive any government funding or even loans from Chinese commercial banks, unlike larger companies, which typically obtain 80 to 90 percent of their funding from Chinese commercial and policy banks.center_img Due to their limited financial ties with the Chinese government and banks, SMEs are less likely to comply with the country’s voluntary guidelines for social and environmental safeguards for overseas investment. For example, the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) found one Chinese company engaged in illegal log export in Mozambique just one month after its representatives attended a guideline training.4) Investments are moving upstream in the timber supply chain.Instead of directly acquiring forest concessions, many Chinese companies began as trading companies that purchased timber from local concessions and forest operators. Now, however, a CIFOR study finds that several Chinese companies in Gabon and Mozambique have moved upstream, acquiring forest land concessions and setting up local factories to directly engage in timber harvesting. More direct access to forests allows Chinese investments to play a bigger role in forest management in Africa.last_img read more