Key questions as Wimbledon faces postponement or cancellation

first_img Read Also: Victor Moses flees Milan for London amid covid-19 fears ‘Meghan Markle’s Wimbledon hair is a look she rarely wears’ or ‘Meghan Markle’s Wimbledon outfit draws backlash’ were particular diversions in 2019. Also into cold storage will go the dependable, ‘Game, sweat and match’, dusted off every time the sun drives up the temperatures in London. And farewell to the ‘gruntometer’, that notorious low-tech gadget employed by the red-tops to categorise the on-court Wimbledon shrieks and screams. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Loading… Promoted ContentWhy Do So Many Digital Assistants Have Feminine Names & Voices?The Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read MoreBest Car Manufacturers In The WorldWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?7 Universities Where Getting An Education Costs A Hefty Penny6 Interesting Ways To Make Money With A Drone10 Risky Jobs Some Women Do6 Extreme Facts About Hurricanes7 Most Asntonishing Train Stations In The World14 Hilarious Comics Made By Women You Need To Follow Right NowWhy Go Veg? 7 Reasons To Do This10 Of The Dirtiest Seas In The World The All England Club will hold an emergency meeting next week to discuss the possible postponement or even cancellation of Wimbledon in the light of the coronavirus pandemic. Wimbledon’s famous logo at the All England Club AFP Sport looks at the key questions facing the organisers of what is generally regarded as the world’s most prestigious tennis tournament. What are the options for Wimbledon this year? – Wimbledon, which is scheduled to take place from June 29 until July 12, has been staged every year in peace time since 1877, shelved only during the two world wars. However, the spread of the coronavirus has brought havoc to the 2020 global sports calendar. Tennis is at a standstill until June 7 with the entire European claycourt season already wiped out. Roland Garros, traditionally the season’s second Grand Slam of four, has been rescheduled from its traditional late May-early June slot to September 20-October 4. The grass court season is relatively short, five weeks for the leading events, so Wimbledon would appear to have time on their side. However, building and preparation work at the All England Club site in leafy south-west London takes two months to complete and is set to start at the end of April. There is also the issue of when the coronavirus will peak. By Thursday, there had been 170 fatalities in London alone with 578 nationwide. Around 9,500 people have been infected so far in the United Kingdom. Health is the top issue for an event which attracts not only the superstars of the sport, but also close to 500,000 spectators each year as well as 6,000 staff and around 3,200 accredited media. Why can’t the tournament be played later in the year? – A slot has opened up in the calendar after the postponement of the Tokyo Olympics until next year. However, Wimbledon organisers know that a postponement by a just fortnight to take advantage of that opening would solve little. It would also mean running into the build-up to the US hardcourt season, the precursor to the August-September US Open in New York. “At this time, based on the advice we have received from the public health authorities, the very short window available to us to stage The Championships due to the nature of our surface suggests that postponement is not without significant risk and difficulty. “Playing behind closed doors has been formally ruled out,” said a spokesman.center_img Two-time Wimbledon mixed doubles champion Jamie Murray said he appreciated the difficulties. “I don’t know how long they could push it back,” Murray, 34, told the BBC. “There’s a lot of other stakeholders, a lot of other tournaments to consider. Even things like daylight for the tournament. “Once the tournament gets put back, there’s less and less daylight.” What would be the financial implications of a cancelled Wimbledon? – The tournament is an annual money-spinner. For example, in the 2017-2018 fiscal year, it was reported that Wimbledon generated $336 million with a pre-tax profit of $52 million. Over 90 per cent of that was ploughed into British tennis. The BBC, which broadcasts Wimbledon, will have a two-week black hole if the event is called off. They reportedly shell out around $72 million a year for the rights. Who would be the losers of a cancelled Wimbledon? – As well as the purely sporting implications of a binned Wimbledon, Britain’s well-heeled would suffer a jolt to their busy summer social season. The Henley Royal Regatta on the River Thames, a feature since 1839, has already been cancelled. Wary eyes will now be cast towards June’s Royal Ascot, which has drawn British royalty and the cream of society since 1911. The British tabloids would also be stripped of their two-week Wimbledon headline bonanza and celebrity fix. Worries over daylight: Britain’s Jamie Murraylast_img read more

High School Tennis

first_imgUnfortunately, the tennis season came to an end for the Oldenburg Academy Twisters at the semi-state.  They lost 5-0 to Terre Haute South High School. Congratulations, however, to Coach Mark Wilder and his Lady Twisters for winning both the sectional and regional championships this year.  This is quite an accomplishment for the 1A Twisters who had to compete against much larger schools for the sectional and regional titles.  Good luck to the seniors on the Twisters squad as they move on to the next chapter in their career.last_img read more

Men’s hockey: Badgers add Ryder Donovan to already strong 2019 recruitment class

first_imgThe University of Wisconsin men’s hockey team turned heads in the recruitment world this past week with the addition of Minnesota native Ryder Donovan to play for the Badgers next year.Donovan, a talented center from Duluth East High School, will join other forwards — Alex Turcotte, Cole Caufield and Owen Lindmark — in next season’s talented incoming freshman class. Donovan will also have the opportunity to play with returning players such as Sean Dhooghe and K’Andre Miller.Donovan signed his National Letter of Intent Monday after backing out of his original commitment to North Dakota last fall. After attending Coach Tony Granato’s hockey camp at UW in the summer of 2016, the two built a strong relationship that was enough for Donovan to commit to UW for his journey through college hockey.Men’s hockey: A look back at Mark Johnson’s legendary careerThousands of Wisconsin fans packed the Kohl Center last Saturday night as the University of Wisconsin’s men’s hockey team was Read…Granato was very excited and optimistic about Donovan’s play and how he would fit in with the Badgers next season.“[He has] lots of great potential to be a big impact player similar to the other players we’re are bringing in,” Granato said in a Wisconsin Hockey press release. “They’ll complement each other well.”He also called Donovan “an elite talent and a hard-working kid.”The six-foot-four, 185-pound centreman averaged two points a game last season. He notched 62 points in 31 games for Duluth East High School and captained the team to the third seed in Minnesota’s high school state championship, before losing to the No. 1 seeded Minnetonka.As this season’s playoffs approach, he has 12 goals and 25 assists in 23 games.Men’s hockey: Badger seek late season momentum to raise Big Ten tournament rankingWith only four games remaining, the University of Wisconsin Men’s hockey team’s (10-15-5, 6-9-5 Big Ten) 2018-19 regular season is Read…Donovan ranks 46th in the top 50 of North American skaters for the 2019 draft by NHL Central Scouting.He represented the U.S. on the Under-18 Select Team at the 2017 Hlinka Gretzky Cup, where he scored the game-winning goal in overtime against Finland to win the U.S. fifth place.Ryder brings the Badgers an impressive amount of speed and his stats show his excellent ability to finish at the net. His advanced hockey sense and vision allow him to benefit his teammates to a momentous extent. Overall Donovan’s game can complement the skills of other incoming freshmen and returning Badgers next season. This skill, along with the many more on his resume, will help him achieve his potential as an elite power forward for Wisconsin.Moving into the 2019-20 season, Granato and the Badgers can look forward to a player who is going to put forth his best effort and also play a major role for Wisconsin in the future.last_img read more