Wallabies great Stephen Moore is building his Brisbane dream home

first_imgMore from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus21 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market21 hours agoAn artist’s impression of the house Graya Construction is building for former Wallabies skipper Stephen Moore. Pic supplied.He’ll have more time on his hands after retiring from rugby in October last year after playing in the Bledisloe Cup match between the Australian Wallabies and the New Zealand All Blacks at Suncorp Stadium.Records show Moore bought the original, two-bedroom house on the site in 2009 for $1.4 million. NEW YORK CHEAPER THAN BRISBANE IS THIS QUEENSLAND’S MOST EXPENSIVE KITCHEN? AUSSIE HOME BUYERS LURED OVERSEAS The original house that Wallabies’ veteran Stephen Moore bought in Brisbane has been demolished to make way for his dream home. Pic supplied.Located on the high side of Howard Street — next door to former Bronco Darren Lockyer’s old house — the property offers panoramic views of Brisbane city and surrounds.The new house has been designed by Tim Stewart Architects and will include five bedrooms over three levels, all boasting views of the city. An artist’s impression of the house Graya Construction is building for Wallabies’ veteran Stephen Moore. Pic supplied. Stephen Moore farewells fans after playing his last match for the Wallabies after the Bledisloe Cup match between the Australian Wallabies and the New Zealand All Blacks at Suncorp Stadium in Brisbane. Photo: Bradley Kanaris/Getty Images.FORMER Wallabies hooker and captain Stephen Moore is busy building his dream home in one of Brisbane’s most sought-after suburbs. The brothers behind Graya Construction have been busy tearing down a rundown, character house on a high block in arguably Paddington’s best street — Howard Street — to make way for a modern masterpiece for Moore and his young family. GET THE LATEST REAL ESTATE NEWS DIRECT TO YOUR INBOX HERE center_img Work has started on Wallabies’ veteran Stephen Moore’s dream home in Brisbane. Pic supplied. Stephen Moore and Rob Gray of Graya Construction on the site of Moore’s new home. Pic supplied.Features will include a wine cellar, PGH brickwork, concrete Caesarstone benchtops, Wolf appliances and a Sub-Zero refrigerator.Moore owns a number of other properties in Brisbane, including a house in Red Hill and units in South Brisbane and Alderley.last_img read more

Student Health to pilot antibody study

first_imgThe study will use a randomized sample of 500 to 800 students from different demographics, including U.S. and international students. The stipulations for recruitment to the study include a minimum age of 18 and require students to reside close enough to the University Park Campus to be able to commute to the Engemann Student Health Center to be tested. Both on- and off-campus students may participate if contacted by Student Health.  “We know that during the spring, we had a significant number of students test positive for infection, and we also know that within young adults in particular, infections appear to be asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic,” Van Orman said. “We’re very interested in knowing what the seroprevalence of COVID-19 antibodies is in the student population.” Student Health will launch a study to test students for coronavirus antibodies, Chief Health Officer Dr. Sarah Van Orman announced in an email to University administrators and student government Wednesday. “We’re trying to get all the specimens collected in about two weeks,” Van Orman said. “We want to turn the data around pretty quickly because we’re very interested in it from like, ‘How do we plan for next fall based on this information?’” While the presence of antibodies has not yet been confirmed to indicate immunity, further research may help to ascertain whether contracting the coronavirus precludes an individual from a subsequent infection, Van Orman said. Currently, antibody studies are used to determine the proportion of a population that has been exposed to the virus. The announcement of the Student Health study comes after the first iteration of a study launched by Price School of Public Policy vice dean Neeraj Sood in partnership with the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health earlier this month to test L.A. County residents for the presence of coronavirus antibodies. The preliminary results of the study estimated that between 2.8 and 5.6% of adults in L.A. County have been exposed to the virus and developed antibodies. According to Van Orman, the study will help the University better determine the prevalence of coronavirus exposure of different student populations within USC, which will play a role in virus screening recommendations for students in at-risk groups. The study, which will close by May 8, may also influencempact the University’s plans for the return of students to campus and the resumption of in-person classes.  “Many people are hopeful that over time, COVID-19 antibody will mean that someone might be immune to reinfection — we don’t know that yet,” Van Orman said. “We do know it may be an important part of understanding who in our community might be at risk.” “We’re trying to understand within a population that tends to circulate with each other, how might it have spread during the spring semester,” she said. While several studies on the presence of antibodies have recently been conducted, the Student Health study will focus specifically on college students and their exposure to the coronavirus. The student population has a unique infection pattern because of their constant interactions within both residential and academic settings, Van Orman said. Participation in the study is open only by invitation, and the population sample will comprise solely USC students. Student Health professionals will administer the antibody tests at no cost to students, and participants will receive their individual results one to two weeks after participating, Van Orman said. last_img read more

Siphon Creek Fire Will Likely Burn Until Autumn

first_imgDOIG RIVER, B.C. – Though previous photographs of the massive plumes of smoke emanating from the Siphon Creek Fire are dramatic, it is from directly above that the charred 853 square kilometres that the true scale of the fire is made apparent.While driving to a media tour put on by the BC Wildfire Service, the only indication of trouble is a streak of haze visible in the distance from the Rose Prairie Road about 30 kilometres north of Fort St. John. The main camp to house the crew doing battle against the conflagration sits two kilometres down a nondescript dirt road surrounded by tall trees on either side. Entering a clearing, the camp sprawls across several acres of a pasture, with a radio mast, numerous trailers, and dozens of tents to house the firefighters and support staff.- Advertisement – The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The Siphon Creek Fire Incident Command Post west of the Doig River First Nation. Photo credit; Chris Newton The man in charge of not only the camp, but the entire firefighting operation is Incident Commander Rob Krause, a well-seasoned firefighter who is in his 35th season with the Forest Service. Krause greets the media with a wide smile below his impressive moustache.Siphon Creek Fire Incident Commander Rob Krause. Photo credit: Chris NewtonSiphon Creek Fire Incident Commander Rob Krause. Photo credit: Chris NewtonAfter giving a quick briefing of the situation, we don red Nomex coveralls and hop into his SUV for a quick drive to another field where the helicopters battling the flames are being staged. The haze of the wildfire’s smoke quickly surrounds us, the smell permeating the SUV’s cabin. Perched atop a hill in a field, one of nearly a dozen helicopters will soon take us 2,000 ft. into the air over the fire. White Rock Staging near the Siphon Creek Fire. Photo credit: Chris Newton White Rock Staging near the Siphon Creek Fire. Photo credit: Chris Newton White Rock Staging near the Siphon Creek Fire. Photo credit: Chris Newton White Rock Staging near the Siphon Creek Fire. Photo credit: Chris Newton White Rock Staging near the Siphon Creek Fire. Photo credit: Chris Newton White Rock Staging near the Siphon Creek Fire. Photo credit: Chris Newton Incident Commander Rob Krause confers with pilot Ben Giesbrecht in front of Giesbrecht's Eurocopter AS350 B2 prior to takeoff. Photo credit: Chris Newton Incident Commander Rob Krause confers with pilot Ben Giesbrecht in front of Giesbrecht’s Eurocopter AS350 B2 prior to takeoff. Photo credit: Chris Newton Ben Giesbrecht is a veteran helicopter pilot, and is both professional and personable as he gives us a pre-flight safety briefing of his Eurocopter AS350 B2. We board, the engines roar to life, and Geisbrecht powers the chopper into the air, banking steeply to starboard in a spiralling skyward corkscrew before heading north-east.Advertisement White Rock Staging as seen from the air. Photo credit: Chris NewtonWhite Rock Staging as seen from the air. Photo credit: Chris NewtonNot five minutes in the air, the source of the haze quickly becomes apparent: Thick plumes of smoke emanate from a controlled burnout operation on the fire’s western flank. Radio chatter between Giesbrecht and the other chopper pilots around us fills the feed coming through our headphones as we trail another helicopter bucketing the flare-up through the smoke. The atmosphere onboard is one of nervous excitement. These pilots are assisting no less than 40 firefighters less than 1,000 feet below us in a war against the flames. Wagner’s “Ride of the Valkyries” could be considered suiting background music for the spectacle of three other helicopters dodging in and out of the smoke, taking turns dropping large buckets of water onto the flare-up. One of several helicopters conducting bucketing operations on the Siphon Creek Fire on May 18th. Photo credit: Chris Newton One of several helicopters conducting bucketing operations on the Siphon Creek Fire on May 18th. Photo credit: Chris Newton One of several helicopters conducting bucketing operations on the Siphon Creek Fire on May 18th. Photo credit: Chris Newton One of several helicopters conducting bucketing operations on the Siphon Creek Fire on May 18th. Photo credit: Chris Newton One of several helicopters conducting bucketing operations on the Siphon Creek Fire on May 18th. Photo credit: Chris Newton One of several helicopters conducting bucketing operations on the Siphon Creek Fire on May 18th. Photo credit: Chris Newton One of several helicopters conducting bucketing operations on the Siphon Creek Fire on May 18th. Photo credit: Chris Newton One of several helicopters conducting bucketing operations on the Siphon Creek Fire on May 18th. Photo credit: Chris Newton We climb, heading towards the fire’s head further north-east. Krause explains that the fire activity is sitting primarily at Rank 2, with some areas burning at Rank 3 (for comparison, the Fort McMurray fire was mainly burning at Rank 5 as it encroached the city 3 weeks ago). This stands in stark contrast to just two days previous when the fire grew by nearly 20,000 hectares. The landscape is a patchwork of untouched stands of spruce forest in a sea of blackened sticks. According to Krause, this is a sign of the fire moving at incredible speed. Lines of brown trees are hypothesized by crews as signs of the fire burning fierce enough to consume all available oxygen which results in incomplete combustion, leaving the trees unburned but singed by the intense heat. The patchy appearance of burned and unburned forest within the Siphon Creek Fire perimeter. Photo credit: Chris Newton The patchy appearance of burned and unburned forest within the Siphon Creek Fire perimeter. Photo credit: Chris Newton The patchy appearance of burned and unburned forest within the Siphon Creek Fire perimeter. Photo credit: Chris Newton The patchy appearance of burned and unburned forest within the Siphon Creek Fire perimeter. Photo credit: Chris Newton The patchy appearance of burned and unburned forest within the Siphon Creek Fire perimeter. Photo credit: Chris Newton The patchy appearance of burned and unburned forest within the Siphon Creek Fire perimeter. Photo credit: Chris Newton The patchy appearance of burned and unburned forest within the Siphon Creek Fire perimeter. Photo credit: Chris Newton The patchy appearance of burned and unburned forest within the Siphon Creek Fire perimeter. Photo credit: Chris Newton The patchy appearance of burned and unburned forest within the Siphon Creek Fire perimeter. Photo credit: Chris Newton The patchy appearance of burned and unburned forest within the Siphon Creek Fire perimeter. Photo credit: Chris Newton Flying around the fire’s perimeter on the return journey, Krause tells us that the lack of intense fire activity below us is due to a shift in the wind from the north, which is pushing the fire back into areas already burned. Due to less rainfall in the past several years Krause says that the water table in the Peace Region is so low that though no large flames are visible, the fire is burning and will continue to burn underground at least until the fire snows fall in autumn. In extreme cases, the blanket of snow can cause a fire to become insulated from the intense cold of winter and reappear the next spring.Advertisement Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton Spot fires burning at Rank 2 and Rank 3 along the Siphon Creek Fires northern flank. Photo credit: Chris Newton We briefly follow another helicopter before peeling off to our southerly track. Geisbrecht and Krause both explain that the other chopper is surveying the fire’s jagged perimeter to establish places that fire guards could be built that will contain the fire while avoiding the numerous pipelines that traverse the terrain, denoted by strips of cleared trees. Crews are unable to use these as fire guards due to the possibility of rupturing them.We circle around for one more pass of the bucketing operations, albeit this time at a much higher altitude, before heading back toward “White Rock Staging”, one of many locations around the conflagration that serve as helipads. Our pilot’s skills are demonstrated during a sharp banking right turn as he swerves the craft to avoid a bird flying in our path. After a feather-soft landing, we return to base and finish the tour with Fire Information Officer Erin Catherall.Fire Information Officer Erin Catherall. Photo credit: Chris NewtonFire Information Officer Erin Catherall. Photo credit: Chris NewtonCatherall explains that the base, which can be set up in a little as 48 hours, can accommodate up to 300 personnel. The base will continue to operate for at least the next month as crews attempt to fully contain the fire within the perimeter. Krause says that monitoring the fire once it is fully contained will the focus of crews, not fully extinguishing it. A map of the Siphon Creek Fire from May 18th set up in the command post Briefing Tent. Photo credit: Chris Newton A map of the Siphon Creek Fire from May 18th set up in the command post Briefing Tent. Photo credit: Chris Newton The northern flank of the Siphon Creek Fire on May 18th, known as the head of the fire. Photo credit: Chris Newton The northern flank of the Siphon Creek Fire on May 18th, known as the head of the fire. Photo credit: Chris Newton The western flank of the Siphon Creek Fire where helicopter crews were conducting bucketing operations on May 18th. Photo credt: Chris Newton The western flank of the Siphon Creek Fire where helicopter crews were conducting bucketing operations on May 18th. Photo credt: Chris Newton As of Friday May 20th,  168 firefighters, 4 helicopters, and 11 pieces of heavy equipment are currently battling the fire on the BC side of the Alberta border. Today a new Ontario incident management team is taking over command on the Alberta side of the border, and is collaborating firefighting efforts with their colleagues from BC.Advertisementlast_img read more