Champions again! – Calabar (287.5), Edwin Allen (329.5) retain titles

first_imgAt 3 p.m yesterday, Calabar High were half of a point behind Kingston College in the race for the Mortimer Geddes trophy. An hour later, the defending champions took over and strangled the life out of their rivals’ challenges in a show of confidence and efficiency, as they powered to their fifth straight and 28th hold on the ISSA/GraceKennedy Boys and Girls’ Championships title. In a 4x400m finale that many had dreamed to witness, Calabar’s Christopher Taylor underlined the title when he anchored his team to the win in 3:09.77 in a blockbuster showdown with KC’s Akeem Bloomfield, who stormed around to the front only to see Taylor outsprint him in the final 100m. KC was timed at 3:10.26 with JC taking third in 3:15.06. Bloomfield, who had to make up a 30m deficit was unofficially clocked at 44.5 seconds on his leg, with Taylor timed at 45.3 seconds. Calabar closed their account on 287.5 points to KC’s 250 with JC ending on 227.5. St Jago were fourth on 175 points, ahead of fifth placed St Elizabeth Technical (100 points) As expected, Edwin Allen formalised their third straight girls’ title, with a comfortable win to continue the Frankfield machine’s growing dynasty with 329.5. Hydel was second on 263; St Jago (241.5); Holmwood (184); Vere (139); Excelsior (80) round out the top spots. Powered by champion girl Junelle Bromfield, St Elizabeth Technical (STETHS) finished with 72 points in seventh. In the Class 2 boys 400m final, Taylor, having already covered the field with 100m to go, looked left; then right before jogging to the line in 47.76, while waving his arms, encouraging his team-mate Brandon Heath, 48.03, to the finish line as Calabar secured a big 16 points. Munro’s Romel Plummer, 48.43 was third. The Calabar titan was again at the front of a one-two finish for his school when he returned to win the 200m title in 22.14 ahead of team-mate Dejour Russell, 21.38 and St Jago’s Gary Gordon, 22.09. In the Class 1 girls 200m final, Holmwood’s Ashley Williams, 24.02 pulled away to win ahead of Green Island’s Kimone Hines, 24.35 and St Jago’s Shanice Reid, 24.42. KC has a special 400m talent of their own and in one of the most predictable results of the day, Akeem Bloomfield manhandled the Class 1 boys 400m field even if his 46.12 was expectedly not as shiny as last year’s 44.93 bomb. St Kago’s Collin Sewell, 47.51 was next best with Calabar’s Aykeeme Francis, 47.66, third. Bromfield, the Class 1 1500m champion, was powerful over the last 100m, as her long legs pushed her to a world junior leading 51.74 win in the Class 1 girls 400m with Holmwood’s Ashley Williams, 52.87, who led up to 250m, coming in second ahead of Petersfield’s Segale Brown, 54.19. She would make it three individual gold medals with an equally impressive win in the 800m, stopping the clock at 2:09.70, with Janiel Moore, 2:15.47 and her Edwin Allen team-mate Asshani Robb, 2:16.73 taking second and third respectively. KC’s Shanthamoi Brown, 50.07 obliged in the Class 3 boys 400m final with a comfortable win over Munro’s Devante Heywood, 50.92, and Daniel Binns (Herbert Morrison), 51.48. The afternoon belonged to Calabar and Seanie Selvin, 14.05 and Tyrone Bryan’s, 14.16, quinella in the Class 1 boys 110m hurdles summed up their mood. JC’s Phillip Lemonios, 14.33 was third. Dejour Russell (Calabar) matched Michael O’Hara’s 13.45 Class 2 boys 110m hurdles record (2013) as he won ahead of Oquendo Bernard (JC), 14.18 and another Calabar man, Orlando Bennett, 14.22. KC’s Davion Williams, 13.62 win the Class 3 boys 100m hurdles event and took his celebration to the KC supporters in the stands. Calabar’s Schavon Carr, 13.89 was second with Warren Henlon (STETHS), 13.94 next best.  Janell Fullerton (St Jago) broke the Class 1 girls shot put record (14.27m), dropping a 14.39m mark to win ahead of Tavia Dixon (Excelsior) 13.61m and Sahjay Stevens (STETHS), 13.17m. St Jago’s Keenan Lawrence, 1:54.84, who broke the 1500m record on Friday also won the Class 2 boys 800m title ahead of Anthony Cox, 1:56.60, also of St Jago and JC’s Dugion Blackman, 1:56.65. In a big upset, the little fancied Nathan Brown (Excelsior), 1:55.21, outlasted St Jago’s Leon Clarke, 1:55.43 and STETHS’ Jauavney James, 1:55.44 in a close Class 1 boys 800m. Calabar secured the two top spots in the Class 1 boys shot put with Kyle Mitchell, 19.27m winning ahead of Warren Barrett Jr, 19.08m and Vashon McCarthy (JC), 18.14m.last_img read more

Musical robots perform duets w Video

first_img New robot skier takes to the slopes (w/ Video) Waseda Flutist Robot This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (PhysOrg.com) — A flute playing robot unveiled by Waseda University last year has been joined by a robot saxophonist in a Classical music duet. The aim of the project was to design robots that could respond to each other’s visual and aural cues. Explore furthercenter_img Early in 2008 other research teams, with Honda and Toyota, unveiled a robot conductor, and a trumpet player. Professor Takanishi’s ultimate goal is to create an entire robot orchestra, and the duet playing robots take him one step closer.More information: • Takanishi Lab page• Waseda Flutist Robot page© 2009 PhysOrg.com Citation: Musical robots perform duets (w/ Video) (2009, November 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-11-musical-robots-duets-video.html The researchers, Atsuo Takanishi and colleagues from Waseda University in Japan, want eventually to develop a robot capable of playing multiple instruments and interacting with human musicians in jazz-style improvisations. The flutist robot was unveiled in mid 2008 after Professor Takanishi, of Waseda’s engineering department had spend many years perfecting it. The saxophone player took much less time to develop but is much less android in appearance than the flute-playing robot. Professor Takanishi said the saxophone player was easier to develop because it is easier to get a sound from a reed instrument than it is from a flute.last_img read more

Truck Firm Wants to Deploy Delivery Drones on the Move

first_img This story originally appeared on Engadget 2 min read Register Now » Amazon’s drone-delivery service may be a little fanciful, but it looks as if another company is working to make something similar to it a reality. Workhorse has applied to the FAA for special permission to begin testing drone deliveries made from the back of one of the firm’s electric cargo vans.The idea is simple enough: as the truck makes its rounds, the roof-mounted HorseFly UAV selects, transports and drops off a parcel right outside the recipient’s front door. The neat trick to all of this would be that the system is autonomous, with the human operator only keeping an eye on the landing to ensure there’s no accidents.The HorseFly was designed with short-journey deliveries in mind, and is expected to fly for half an hour carrying 10 pounds. It was built as a partnership between Workhorse and the University of Cincinnati and will have wireless charging so that its batteries can re-juice between drop-offs.Since it’s nearly impossible for a drone to travel super long distances with heavy cargo, Amazon’s idea of delivering packages from its nearest warehouse seems a bit silly. This system, on the other hand, seems to have plenty of potential. July 29, 2015 Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right.last_img read more

This Immigrant Entrepreneur and DACA Recipient Raised Over 15 Million in Funding

first_img Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. 1 min read Google. Pfizer. Tesla. eBay. Capital One. AT&T. These companies were all founded, completely or in part, by immigrants, who account for close to 30 percent of all new entrepreneurs in the U.S. Victor Santos, who emigrated from Brazil at age 12, is one of them. Santos co-founded Airfox, a mobile financial services company for unbanked individuals in emerging markets, and he’s also a DACA recipient. (DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, is an American immigration policy allowing for some immigrants brought to the U.S. as children to receive a renewable stay on deportation action.)On this episode of How Success Happens, Santos recalls how, during his fundraising process, venture capitalists told him they didn’t feel comfortable with his immigration status. He also shares his five-year plan for the company, his best advice for pitching a business idea and how his identity as an immigrant inspired him as an entrepreneur. center_img Register Now » July 26, 2019last_img read more