Still Dusty.

first_imgU.S. Drought Monitor Most of Georgia has had a dry late summer. Hydrologic conditions across the state have not improved. Across much of the northern two-thirds of Georgia, agricultural drought has returned.Late summer’s dryness prevented recharge of the hydrologic systems across the state. Groundwater levels are near last year’s lows, with some places near record low levels. This is especially important in south and coastal Georgia, where groundwater is the major source of fresh water.Stream flows in the mountains, the piedmont, the northern coastal plain, and the southwest corner of the state are extremely low.Georgia rivers with very low levels include the Little River near Washington at 6 percent of normal flow, the Flint near Griffin at 16 percent, the Ohoopee near Reidsville at 18 percent, the Broad near Bell at 25 percent and the Oconee near Athens at 38 percent.Only southeast and south central Georgia have above normal stream flows. Above-normal flows are reported in the St. Marys-Satilla and the Suwanee-Ochlockonee River Basins. These basins had generous tropically induced rainfall during the past few weeks.Major reservoirs across north and central Georgia remain well below summer full pool. Reservoirs at least 5 feet low include Allatoona at 5 feet, Clarks Hill and Hartwell 7 feet and Lanier 10 feet.Agricultural Drought BackBecause of the dry conditions since Aug. 1, the northeastern coastal plain and the central and eastern piedmont have returned to agricultural drought conditions.Crops, pastures, lawns and landscapes are showing drought stress. Cities in the region include Athens, with 21 percent of normal rainfall, Atlanta (31 percent), Augusta (64 percent), Dublin (50 percent), Statesboro (25 percent) and Vidalia (50 percent).Most of north Georgia had below-normal rainfall during the past seven weeks. From Aug. 1 through Sept. 18, the percentage of normal rainfall received included 47 percent at Watkinsville, 59 percent at Rome, 61 percent at Calhoun, 62 percent at Dunwoody and 66 percent at Gainesville.Across middle Georgia, the percentage of normal rainfall over the past seven weeks include Griffin at 41 percent, Dearing at 44 percent and Eatonton at 55 percent.Soil Moisture LowMore important than the rainfall deficits is the actual loss of moisture from the soils. Soils lose moisture through evaporation and transpiration (plant water use).Between Aug. 1 and Sept. 18, soil-moisture losses in north Georgia include Watkinsville at 5.85 inches, Calhoun 4.13, Dunwoody 3.62, Duluth 3.52, Gainesville 3.40, Rome 3.31 and Dallas 2.60.In middle Georgia, soil-moisture losses include Midville at 6.61 inches, Griffin 5.85, Eatonton 4.73, Dearing 4.43 and Cordele 4.11.And in south Georgia soil-moisture losses include Statesboro at 6.39 inches, Tifton 4.72, and Vidalia 4.71, Savannah 2.68 and Plains 2.16.Peanut Farmers Need It DryWhile many Georgians would like some rain, many peanut farmers would prefer a few more weeks of dry weather. The peanut harvest is in high gear and will benefit from a dry period. The state’s wineries, too, will benefit from a dry August and September.There is little hope for long-term relief during the next three months. September through November is historically Georgia’s driest period.Without rainfall from tropical weather, there is little chance that the state will receive enough widespread beneficial rain to end both the hydrological drought and the agricultural drought.A wetter-than-normal winter is the best hope for Georgia to emerge from the long-term drought.last_img read more

Tata plans closure of UK’s British Steel pension fund

first_imgThe British Steel Pension Scheme (BSPS) is to close to new accrual, Tata Steel has told union representatives.Union GMB called Tata’s plan to close the fund “unnecessary and profoundly disappointing”, and said it was preparing a strike ballot.According to the union, the fund had £13.6bn (€17bn) in assets at the end of November last year, up from £12.6bn at the end of March. David Hulse, GMB national officer, said the union did not expect to find itself discussing closure to new accrual, following months of negotiations that got underway in November. “Throughout a long process, we have acted in good faith and negotiated constructively in trying to reach an agreement that addresses what we acknowledge to be a significant deficit in the scheme,” Hulse added.According to the fund’s most recent annual report from 2013-14, BSPS had a £1.1bn deficit in March 2013 when measured on an on-going basis.Hulse was critical of Tata’s plans to close the fund to new accrual.“We have made every effort to compromise with the company, even discussing the possibility of meeting the deficit through changes to member benefits, despite the fact the company is legally obliged to pay for the deficit and has always done so in the past,” Hulse said.“Sadly, the company rejected this offer out of hand. It appears they are hell-bent on closing the scheme and are not prepared to compromise.”He said the management of parent company Tata Steel Europe should “seriously consider their positions” after what he deemed a breakdown in trust between the scheme’s sponsor and its workforce.A spokesman for Tata said the company put forward changes to the defined benefits (DB) fund that would have balanced any changes across the entire workforce.“We believe the trade unions’ proposals to change member benefits would have unfairly disadvantaged younger scheme members, who would have had to bear most of the impact of the changes.He added: “We have been unable to come to an agreement that would have enabled defined benefit provision to continue and we will be consulting employees on a proposal to close the defined benefit scheme to future accrual.It is proposed that future pension provision will be on a defined contribution basis.BTPS is a DB scheme, with a standalone defined contribution arrangement launched in 2014.The DB section returned 1.6% over the course of the 2013-14 financial year, and 7.8% over the three years to 2014.last_img read more