UFC: Trilogy bout with Nate Diaz should happen at 155 lbs, McGregor insists

first_img#KicksStalker: Jordan’s second shoe gets new life Search on for 5 Indonesians snatched anew in Lahad Datu But if Diaz is indeed interested in a trilogy bout, McGregor insists that it has to be in the 155-lb. division, which the Irish superstar currently lords over.“I’m the 155-pound champion, I faced him at 170, he beat me, then I rematched him at 170, I beat him,” he was quoted as saying in a BBC News report. “Now I’m the 155-pound world champion. If he wants that fight, he must come down”.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’After fighting above his weight class for their first two matches, “The Notorious” believes it’s only natural that the third match take place under his stipulations.“That’s a fair trade. I didn’t ask for the rematch at a lower weight, I asked for the rematch at the exact same weight,” he explained. “I thought that was a fair play move on my half and then I came in and I won. So now I won that, then I won the 155-pound title after that. If he wants to fight, he’s got to make that 155-pound limit.” Meanwhile, McGregor is expected to take some time off fighting after competing in the biggest fight of his life against undefeated boxing legend Floyd Mayweather Jr.He also made it clear that he is open to taking another boxing match if the right fight comes along.  Khristian Ibarrola /raRELATED STORIES:Olympic medalist Michael Phelps challenges Conor McGregor to swimming raceLOOK: McGregor congratulates Mayweather, says he has ‘strong tools’ for MMAADVERTISEMENT Hotdog’s Dennis Garcia dies LATEST STORIES UFC fighters Nate Diaz (left) and Conor McGregor. AP File photoNow that Conor McGregor’s tenure inside the boxing ring has passed, it’s time to get back to the UFC and settle some unfinished business inside the octagon.Perhaps high on the UFC Lightweight Champion’s list is a grudge match against Nate Diaz, whom he engaged in two thrilling welterweight bouts last year.ADVERTISEMENT OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Britain’s Prince Harry and Meghan Markle to give up royal titles Police seize P68-M worth of ‘shabu’ in Pasay National Historical team rescues Amorsolos, artifacts from Taal Marcosian mode: Duterte threatens to arrest water execs ‘one night’ Britain’s Prince Harry and Meghan Markle to give up royal titles View comments MOST READ Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Bishop Baylon encourages faithful in Albay to help Taal evacueeslast_img read more

Archaeologists Uncover First Use of Spices in European Cuisine

first_imgBits of silica stuck in charred residues scraped from pots reveal that chefs in northern Europe were cooking with spices at least 6 millennia ago. Although researchers have previously noted the use of strong-flavored ingredients such as onions by cooks in this region during the same era, the new find is the first to report the use of an ingredient that didn’t also have nutritional value—which means that the spice, ground seeds from a plant called garlic mustard, was almost certainly used solely for its flavor.The clues researchers used in the new study are microscopic bits of silica called phytoliths (from Greek, meaning “plant stones”). Plants produce these rugged structures from dissolved minerals in ground water that is pulled into their roots and then distributed throughout the organism, says Hayley Saul, a bioarchaeologist at the University of York in the United Kingdom. While some phytoliths are deposited inside a plant’s cells, others are created in spaces between cells or in special tissues. In many cases, phytoliths are characteristic of certain species, and can, due to their minerallike nature, persist long after a plant’s soft tissues have decomposed.In their latest research, Saul and her colleagues looked at small samples of charred material scraped from the inner surfaces of pottery fragments from two sites in Denmark and one site nearby in northern Germany. Of 74 samples, 26 included phytoliths with a globular shape and a distinctively wrinkled surface, Saul says. Their average size was about 7 micrometers across, less than half the diameter of the finest human hair. When the researchers compared the phytoliths from the residue with those produced in the stems, leaves, and seeds of more than 120 European and Asian plants, the only ones that matched were those made in the seeds of garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata), a biennial herb that grows in a swath from Europe through Central Asia to northern India and western China. Garlic mustard was introduced to the United States in the 19th century and has since become a noxious, invasive species in many regions, especially in forest floors and on floodplains. Carbon-dating of the charred material, soot on the outside of the pot, or of charcoal or bones found with the pot fragments suggests that the phytolith-riddled meals were cooked between 5750 and 6100 years ago, the researchers report today in PLOS ONE. While archaeologists have unearthed flavorful ingredients such as capers and coriander at older sites in the Near East, the new finds are the oldest to chronicle spice use in Europe.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Because garlic mustard seeds contain little if any starch, it’s not likely that the seeds were a source of nutrition, Saul says. Indeed, in all but one of the samples that contained phytoliths, the team also found chemical fragments of specific types of fatty substances called lipids that are either produced by ruminants such as red deer or marine creatures such as mussels, scallops, or fish. Those creatures were probably the largest part of the meal, Saul says, but ground garlic mustard—which has a strong, peppery flavor—likely spiced up the dish.The new study “is an innovative use of microfossil analysis,” says Deborah Pearsall, a paleoethnobotanist at the University of Missouri, Columbia. Because the tiny bits of silica came from charred residues on the inside of a pot, she notes, “there’s no ambiguity that humans were involved. … These phytoliths were there because some ancient cook added spice to the stew.”Not all plants produce a distinct type of phytolith, says Arlene Rosen, an environmental archaeologist at the University of Texas, Austin. “But these [phytoliths] are not like any I’ve seen in any other plant, and they compare favorably” with those produced in the seeds of garlic mustard, she notes. “I think it’s a high probability that they came from that plant.”Recently, using cod and pork—meats that inhabitants of Denmark and northern Germany certainly ate, based on remains found at the archeological sites—and garlic mustard, Saul cooked up flavorful replicas of ancient stews. “They went down very well,” she says.Because garlic mustard is found across a broad region, Saul notes, it’s not clear whether its use as a spice originated in northern Europe or was imported from other areas, such as the Near East. Regardless of where the culinary practice began, however, the new finding suggests that Stone Age cooks “didn’t necessarily ‘shop’ based on nutrient value,” Rosen says. “They ate things for their taste.”last_img read more