Press release: Top learner encourages Class of 2017 to play their part, build South Africa

first_imgWith the matriculants of 2016 entering the wider world, top learner, Karabo Moreni, calls on the Class of 2017 to lead fellow learners in the coming year. (Image: Brand South Africa)Johannesburg, Monday 13 March 2017 – Karabo Moremi from Dendron Secondary School in Limpopo was among the country’s top achievers for the Class of 2016 national senior certificate examinations, says playing his part in preparing for his studies was a key factor for his academic success.“I played my part, and committed myself to studying as well as assisting other learners, and all the hard work paid off. Preparation is key as I studied well in advance and I made sure that I consulted my teachers if I didn’t understand. Success in life depends on being a strong person with clear goals and an indomitable spirit.”Having obtained seven distinctions in English, Sepedi, Science, Accounting, Maths, Life Orientation and Life Sciences – Karabo Moremi lost his mother in 2009 at the age of 11 years. The 18 year old who will this year pursue his higher education degree in Actuarial Science at the University of Cape Town – said he fully understands challenges that face many families and youth in South Africa which may be a hindrance to attaining one’s goals.“Napoleon Hill once said ‘every adversity, every failure, every heartache carries with it the seed of an equal or greater benefit’. Courage, discipline and perseverance flourish when we are tested. I am blessed because I had my father, aunt, friends, cousins and teachers who saw me through my trying times.“My wish for the Class of 2017 is for them to play their part in applying themselves to their studies because the benefits of a decent education are vital to being successful in life,” added Moremi.Brand South Africa’s GM for Marketing, Ms Sithembile Ntombela said the youth and their aspirations is a key constituency in Brand South Africa’s Play Your Part programme.Ms Ntombela said: “The Play Your Part campaign is a call to every South African to do what they do excellently and with diligence in order to help the country move forward. The Play your Part campaign was created to stimulate South African society from the ground up to fulfil their individual potential, in all they do, and Karabo Moremi embodies these values.Brand South Africa encourages matriculants to manage their study time through proper planning and to engage with other students by forming study communities to help each other – this is what Play your Part is all about. Helping and uplifting others.”last_img read more

Women in science are honoured

first_imgMaths and Science have been earmarked in South Africa’s National Development Plan as the subjects of the future and that will make a difference in the country. (Image: My Science Work)Maths and science have been singled out in South Africa’s National Development Plan, or Vision 2030, as subjects that will take the country forward.The Department of Science and Technology (DST) is playing its part in making sure that women excelling in these subjects and careers relating to them are highlighted and celebrated. Female scientist and researchers were honoured at the 2015 South African Women in Science Awards (WISA).Under the theme this year, “Science for a sustainable future”, the awards were handed out on 13 August, in the middle of Women’s Month, in Sandton, Johannesburg.“The Women in Science Awards, which take place every year in Women’s Month, recognise women who have excelled in research and profile them as role models for younger women,” explained Science and Technology Minister Naledi Pandor.“Apart from rewarding outstanding research work in areas aligned to the attainment of Millennium Development Goals, the 2015 WISA also recognised excellence in early career research by awarding scholarships and fellowships to masters and doctoral students.”The women’s admirable achievements provided inspiration and encouragement to many more young women to pursue science-related careers, she added.“We are very excited as a nation to witness women performing so well and displaying a high degree of excellence in the fields of science and technology as well as research,” President Jacob Zuma said.“It is therefore my pleasure to congratulate, on behalf of government and all the people of South Africa, the winners of the 2015 Women in Science Awards which were held this past week to recognise women who have made a remarkable contribution in this very important industry for our country’s development.”The government, he added, would continue to support initiatives led by women to ensure total empowerment and emancipation of women.THE WINNERSThe winners of the 2015 Women in Science Awards are:Professor Maureen Coetzee – winner of the Distinguished Woman Researcher in Life Sciences Award was recognised for her outstanding work in the field of medical entomology. Her research interests include insecticide resistance in the major African malaria vector mosquitoes, biodiversity within the genus Anopheles, novel methods for controlling malaria vectors, and vector-parasite interactions.Professor Marla Trindade – winner of the Distinguished Young Woman Researcher in Life Sciences Award is the director of the Institute for Microbial Biotechnology and Metagenomics, an internationally recognised research centre in the department of biotechnology at the University of Western Cape. It comprises a team of over 45 researchers and staff and is leading the country in the area of mining microbial genomes for novel biotechnologically relevant enzymes and products. Trindade is also the vice-president of the South African Society for Microbiology.Professor Lindiwe Zungu – winner of the Distinguished Woman Researcher in Humanities and Sciences Award, Zungu is a full professor of health studies at the University of South Africa. Her research outputs have contributed to workers’ health and safety, for instance, guidelines for the redesign of safety clothing for women in mining. Her guidelines have been accepted as a national standard for the mining sector, and she continues to receive invitations to make presentations on the guidelines to stakeholders such as the Safety in Mines Research Advisory Committee and the Chamber of Mines.Dr Gina Ziervogel – winner of the Distinguished Young Woman Researcher in Humanities and Sciences Award, Ziervogel has contributed to Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 7 that ensures environmental sustainability. She has situated environmental concerns within the broader development paradigm, helping to address MDG 1 that involves eradicating poverty and hunger as well. Her work has focused on adaptation to the impacts of climate change, from household level up to village and municipal level. Ziervogel is a senior lecturer in the department of environmental and geographical science and a research fellow in the African Climate and Development Initiative at the University of Cape Town (UCT).MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALSAccording to The Millennium Development Goals Report 2015, the 15-year effort to achieve the eight aspirational goals set out in the Millennium Declaration in 2000 was largely successful across the globe, while acknowledging shortfalls that remain. The data and analysis presented in the report show that with targeted interventions, sound strategies, adequate resources and political will, even the poorest can make progress.In 2000, eight millennium goals were highlighted to be reached by 2015, these were:Eradicating extreme hunger and povertyAchieving universal primary educationPromoting gender equality and empowering womenReducing child mortalityImproving maternal healthCombating HIV/Aids, malaria and other diseasesEnsuring environmental sustainabilityDeveloping a global partnership for developmentUnited Nations secretary-general Ban Ki-moon said: “Following profound and consistent gains, we now know that extreme poverty can be eradicated within one more generation. The MDGs have greatly contributed to this progress and have taught us how governments, business and civil society can work together to achieve transformational breakthroughs.”last_img read more

Wheat harvest jumps from last week, lags behind a year ago

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest There was abundant field activity last week as temperatures remained above normal and rainfall was very light, according to Cheryl Turner, State Statistician, USDA NASS, Ohio Field Office. There were a season high 5.7 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending July 14.Clear skies allowed farmers to spray herbicides and side dress fields where necessary. Corn leaves were rolling on sandy soils and in hot, dry areas of the State. Soybean and corn conditions improved slightly from the prior week as the rains slowed and fields dried out. Reports of corn and soybean replanting meant varying levels of plant progress within some fields and overall delayed maturity.Wheat combines rolled quickly, as wheat harvested progress was up 35 percentage points from the prior week. Oat condition improved slightly from the prior week as 42 percent of the crop was rated in good to excellent condition. The hot, dry weather was good for making hay last week. First cuttings of hay have mostly been taken off of the fields and second cuttings were well underway, although all hay progress was still behind the 5-year averages. Pasture and range condition improved slightly to 44 percent good to excellent condition.You can read the full report here.last_img read more

Assam PHC destroyed records: advocates

first_imgA primary health centre (PHC) in western Assam’s South Salmara-Mankachar district has come under the scanner for allegedly destroying birth-related records after a complaint that its officials took money to issue fake birth certificates.The complainants – advocates Anisur Rahman and Azaharul Islam – said the PHC issued many birth certificates against the same serial numbers. Such duplication has made it difficult for people to prove their citizenship as July 30, the date for publishing the complete draft of the updated National Register of Citizens (NRC), draws near.Many people had enclosed birth certificates as proof of citizenship. The NRC, wary of fake documents, had on May 1 issued a notification that birth certificates issued by any entity other than the health department and more than a year after the birth of child would not be legally admissible.In their FIR on Tuesday, the advocates said a section of officials of the South Salmara PHC had destroyed the birth-related documents of 25 years to “erase their misconduct”.last_img read more

Life in motion

first_imgPavitra Chalam, 28At the age of 21, she was already an established name in art circles. A graduate from the New York Film Academy, she has 35 documentary films in her kitty including the award-winning Anamika: Her Glorious Past. Having done stints at various news organisations as a journalist, she,Pavitra Chalam, 28At the age of 21, she was already an established name in art circles. A graduate from the New York Film Academy, she has 35 documentary films in her kitty including the award-winning Anamika: Her Glorious Past. Having done stints at various news organisations as a journalist, she finally realised that her passion lay in filmmaking. Her narrations are compelling and undeniably affective and have forced the world to sit back and take notice.Time travel: The art of story-telling has fascinated me since I was three. In my stint at NDTV and BBC as a journalist, I realised that filmmaking was my calling. I wanted to share my experiences and narrate stories on issues that affected many in our country. My journey began with Bus at the Youth Initiative for Peace in 2003 in Pakistan and I haven’t looked back since then.Above the line: Filmmaking has been a transformational experience so far. For instance, I saw my friend being overpowered by drug addiction and it changed me to an extent that I wanted to share this experience with everyone. This art has given me a vent to bring about sensitivity in the masses. It has reaffirmed my faith in what I do and what I have been doing.Lights, camera, action: Filmmaking is an honest medium and its purpose is to convey issues that matter. My films always have a human interest angle and I plan to keep it that way. I am fascinated by the styles of different filmmakers but I want my films to be beautiful and show what I have seen. I am inspired by the lives and struggles of those I film and this makes it even more imperative for me to narrate their stories.Intermission: I feel blessed to have a supportive group of friends and family. And when I am not making movies, I try to be around them as much as I can. Being an athlete, I try to catch up on kickboxing and various other sports. I adore soft toys and chocolates and have not been able to give them up, which I think is my only vice. Apart from that, I am an avid tea drinker and cannot seem to get more of it.Stepping stone: Having studied filmmaking, I knew the basics and this helped me move forward with fresher topics and a new style of presentation. In the initial days, my audience was niche. But it soon graduated to a large number of people. This overwhelming response pushed me into doing things even better.Feat of life: I still have a long way to go in terms of achievement and am still in the learning curve. Yet, every piece of my work is special and something we are meant to do. I see change around me and this ability to inspire drives me to do something unparalleled.The path to glory: It is very important to focus and develop an ability to be able to tell stories honestly. Films should glorify life and motivate everyone to help those who are deprived. If young filmmakers realise this gift, a complete transformation in how we tell our stories can happen.advertisementlast_img read more