‘Cool Hand’ Luke Hardy leads Del Norte to Big 5 win over Eureka Loggers

first_imgEureka >> In a league-opening showdown, the kid they call ‘Cool Hand’ was as cool as they come.Del Norte pitcher Luke Hardy wiggled his way out of several jams to earn a complete-game victory as the Warriors defeated the Eureka Loggers 5-3 on Wednesday at Bud Cloney Field in Eureka.“I was able to focus with my catcher, Cole [Harper], and hit my spots, that was key for me,” said Hardy, a junior right-hander who allowed three runs on 10 hits and stranded nine Eureka runners. “Keep the ball down …last_img read more

SF Giants planning surprises for Bruce Bochy’s last week

first_imgSAN FRANCISCO — The Giants will host the Dodgers for the final series of the season at Oracle Park this weekend, but the rivalry games will take a backseat to other end-of-year festivities.The Giants are planning to hold ceremonies on each of the last three days of the season, with the largest coming on Sunday when the franchise honors Bruce Bochy before, during and after the final game of his 25-year managerial career.The organization is not revealing a formal guest list for Sunday’s game, …last_img read more

Zuma cracks the whip over textbooks

first_img4 July 2012South African President Jacob Zuma has cracked the whip over school textbook delivery delays in the country’s Limpopo province, appointing a task team to investigate, while national Basic Education Minister Angie Motshekga has apologised for the province.Task team to investigate“Members of the task team will investigate the causes of the non-delivery and delays to affected schools and make recommendations to prevent a future recurrence,” the Presidency said in a statement on Wednesday.“The President has directed that all who are found to have played a role in delaying or stopping the delivery of books should be held accountable and face the consequences.”Deputy Finance Minister Nhlanhla Nene will chair the team, which also comprises Deputy Basic Education Minister Enver Surty, Deputy Performance Monitoring and Evaluation Minister Obed Bapela, Deputy Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs Minister Yunus Carrim and Deputy Public Service and Administration Minister Ayanda Dlodlo.‘There should have been proper planning’Zuma Motshekga and Surty in Pretoria on Tuesday over the long-delayed delivery of textbooks in Limpopo.Zuma emphasized to Motshekga that it was unacceptable for service providers or officials to destroy limited and precious education resources like books.The President said there should have been proper planning for the delivery of resources. “For example, the South African National Defence Force could have been used to deliver textbooks if there was proper coordination and planning,” said Zuma.Zuma ordered the ministry to complete the current delivery process, and to work with the National Treasury and the province to ensure that adequate resources were made available. He stressed that planning should be carried out properly for next year’s procurement and delivery of textbooks.The President will meet all ministers involved in the Limpopo intervention to review progress and prevent future problems around the intervention.Call centre for public queries, informationThe textbook delay has affected grades 1, 2, 3 and 10 pupils in Limpopo. Last week, the Department of Basic Education announced that about 99% of textbooks had finally been delivered to grade 10s in the province, while 100% had now been delivered to grade 1, 2 and 3 pupils.However, the department said it was concerned about reports that books may not have reached all schools in the province.Motshekga has in the meantime laid a charge against service providers who were contracted to deliver grade 8 and 9 workbooks in Limpopo but dumped some of the books.The department has also set up a call centre to handle public queries and information on schools that may have not received learning materials.Motshekga apologisesOn Tuesday, Motshekga unequivocally apologised for the delays.She said that because the provincial Education Department had been placed under national administration, it was only in May that orders for textbooks could be placed with the publishers.Motshekga added that it was incorrect to suggest that no textbooks had been delivered and no learning had taken place in Limpopo this year.She said workbooks in literacy and numeracy for grades 1 to 9 had been delivered on time.“In addition, readers of the previous year and other resource materials could be used as teachers were trained on where there was a deviation from the previous syllabus,” Motshekga said.“With regard to grades 10, all learners received a textbook on mathematics and science on time.”The deviations in the other subjects were brought to the attention of teachers in training sessions last year, and older textbooks could therefore be used for teaching.This did not, however, detract from the responsibility of the provincial sphere of government to deliver new books on time, hence the intervention by the national government.National government intervention in LimpopoLast year, national government intervened in several provincial departments in Limpopo, such as Roads and Transport; Health; Public Works; and Provincial Treasury, in terms of section 100 (1)(b) of the Constitution.The Presidency said on Wednesday that the intervention in Limpopo had been made difficult by the fact that there was currently no national legislation regulating interventions in terms of section 100 of the Constitution.The Department of Cooperative Governance had developed the Monitoring, Support and Intervention Bill to fill this gap.“The President has directed the Presidency and the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs to prioritise the finalisation of this crucial legislation,” the Presidency said.It added that the President had also directed that while the legislation was being finalised, a special protocol be developed to manage relations between the different spheres of government and ensure that service delivery was not affected.“Government concedes that there are many lessons to be learned from the Limpopo experience, especially relating to how to manage constitutional interventions by national government in provincial departments,” the Presidency said in a statement.Source: SANews.gov.zalast_img read more

4 militants killed in Shopian and Handwara

first_imgFour militants were killed in two separate encounters in Kashmir valley on Thursday.Three militants, identified as Sajad Khanday, Aqib Ahmad Dar and Basharat Ahmad Mir, all residents of Pulwama, were killed in an early morning operation at Yawran village of Keller in Shopian district.“We had credible inputs about their presence in the area. All the three bodies were retrieved from the site of encounter. It was a combined group of Hizbul Mujahideen and Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT),” said the police. Three rifles were recovered from the site.Dar, according to the police, had a long history and was involved in conspiring and executing many “terror attacks” in the area. Three AK rifles were recovered and were taken in the case records for further investigation,” the police said.In a separate gunfight that erupted in north Kashmir’s Kupwara district, one Jaish-e-Muhammad militant was killed. “Yaroo area of Langate in Handwara was cordoned off following a tip. The search party was fired upon. One militant was killed,” said the police.The slain militant was identified as Danish Ahmad Dar, a resident of Sopore.“Dar was affiliated to JeM. One rifle and grenades were recovered from the site of encounter,” the police said.last_img read more

Life in motion

first_imgPavitra Chalam, 28At the age of 21, she was already an established name in art circles. A graduate from the New York Film Academy, she has 35 documentary films in her kitty including the award-winning Anamika: Her Glorious Past. Having done stints at various news organisations as a journalist, she,Pavitra Chalam, 28At the age of 21, she was already an established name in art circles. A graduate from the New York Film Academy, she has 35 documentary films in her kitty including the award-winning Anamika: Her Glorious Past. Having done stints at various news organisations as a journalist, she finally realised that her passion lay in filmmaking. Her narrations are compelling and undeniably affective and have forced the world to sit back and take notice.Time travel: The art of story-telling has fascinated me since I was three. In my stint at NDTV and BBC as a journalist, I realised that filmmaking was my calling. I wanted to share my experiences and narrate stories on issues that affected many in our country. My journey began with Bus at the Youth Initiative for Peace in 2003 in Pakistan and I haven’t looked back since then.Above the line: Filmmaking has been a transformational experience so far. For instance, I saw my friend being overpowered by drug addiction and it changed me to an extent that I wanted to share this experience with everyone. This art has given me a vent to bring about sensitivity in the masses. It has reaffirmed my faith in what I do and what I have been doing.Lights, camera, action: Filmmaking is an honest medium and its purpose is to convey issues that matter. My films always have a human interest angle and I plan to keep it that way. I am fascinated by the styles of different filmmakers but I want my films to be beautiful and show what I have seen. I am inspired by the lives and struggles of those I film and this makes it even more imperative for me to narrate their stories.Intermission: I feel blessed to have a supportive group of friends and family. And when I am not making movies, I try to be around them as much as I can. Being an athlete, I try to catch up on kickboxing and various other sports. I adore soft toys and chocolates and have not been able to give them up, which I think is my only vice. Apart from that, I am an avid tea drinker and cannot seem to get more of it.Stepping stone: Having studied filmmaking, I knew the basics and this helped me move forward with fresher topics and a new style of presentation. In the initial days, my audience was niche. But it soon graduated to a large number of people. This overwhelming response pushed me into doing things even better.Feat of life: I still have a long way to go in terms of achievement and am still in the learning curve. Yet, every piece of my work is special and something we are meant to do. I see change around me and this ability to inspire drives me to do something unparalleled.The path to glory: It is very important to focus and develop an ability to be able to tell stories honestly. Films should glorify life and motivate everyone to help those who are deprived. If young filmmakers realise this gift, a complete transformation in how we tell our stories can happen.advertisementlast_img read more