Corby Hall holds open house

first_imgFor young men at Notre Dame considering a religious vocation, the doors at Corby Hall are always open. On Wednesday night at 8 p.m., Corby Night, hosted by Holy Cross priests, brothers and seminarians, took place at Corby Hall for those young men discerning the priesthood. It began with a candlelight service in the chapel of the hall and was followed by a social hour, in which the undergraduates could get to know one another and speak with the religious leaders. Fr. Jim Gallagher, director of the Office of Vocations, said he could relate to young men deciding whether or not a life in the priesthood was right for them. “For the longest time it was on my mind but I never talked to anybody about it,” Gallagher said. “The most important thing is to talk to somebody.” Students at the event ranged from Notre Dame undergraduates and those living at Old College, the University’s undergraduate seminary for the Congregation of the Holy Cross, to seminarians who had already completed their undergraduate degree.  Vincent Nguyen, a Notre Dame senior who currently lives in Moreau Seminary, said he recognized his vocation as early as freshman year. “It was the community life and prayer life that brought it all together,” Nguyen said. As a seminarian, Nguyen said he is still an active member of the Notre Dame community and is able to balance the religious aspects of his life with academics and social activities.  “I’ve had practice with the balancing since I lived in Old College for the first three years,” Nguyen said. “I’m still involved on campus.” In the past 10 to 15 years, vocations to the priesthood in America have increased, Gallgher said. At a Catholic university such as Notre Dame, those thinking about committing to life as a priest have many resources to help them in their discernment, he said. “The sort of guys who might be thinking about a vocation will go to Notre Dame,” he said. “At Notre Dame there are a lot of opportunities to deepen one’s faith life.” However, a calling to the priesthood is not met without certain difficulties, he said. “One of the biggest challenges is commitment,” Gallagher said. “For young people today it’s hard because there are so many things for them to commit to.” Gallagher said talking to one of the many priests and brothers on campus is a good way for young men to introduce themselves and discuss their vocation. “My job is not to convince them to join the seminary,” Gallagher said. “My job is to help them decide whether or not the seminary is right for them.”last_img read more

Bushfires burned a fifth of Australia’s forest: Study

first_imgTopics : Australia’s wildfires have destroyed more than a fifth of the country’s forests, making the blazes “globally unprecedented” following a years-long drought linked to climate change, researchers said Monday.Climate scientists are currently examining data from the disaster, which destroyed swathes of southeastern Australia, to determine to what extent they can be attributed to rising temperatures. In a special edition of the journal Nature Climate Change, Australian researchers examined several other aspects of the blazes, including investigations into their extent and possible causes.  Boer said his study almost certainly underestimates the extent of forest loss as the island state of Tasmania was not covered in the data.Australia’s annual average forest loss to wild fires is typically well below 2 percent.- Droughts linked to sea temperature -Another study published Monday looked at the conditions that made the fires so damaging — a years-long dry spell in Australia’s Murray-Darling Basin.Droughts create more fuel for wildfires and make it harder for forests to recover after each blaze. Andrew King, from the University of Melbourne, and colleagues looked at a phenomenon known as the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD), which has a direct effect on rainfall levels in Australia and elsewhere. Since 2017 much of Australia has experienced widespread drought, something the study attributed to a relative lack of negative IOD events — when there are warmer than normal sea surface temperatures in the east Indian Ocean with cooler waters in the west.These events tend to shift weather patterns and typically bring greater rainfall to southeast Australia, and are made less frequent as global sea temperatures warm. King and the team examined rainfall statistics and found that the winter of 2016 saw extremely heavy precipitation and a corresponding negative IOD event.Since then, the Murray-Darling Basin has experienced 12 consecutive seasons with below-average rainfall, the longest period on record since 1900.”With climate change there have been projections that there will be more positive IOD events and fewer negative IOD events,” King told AFP. “This would mean that we’d expect more dry seasons in Australia and possibly worse droughts.”Boer said that climate change was all but certain to make Australia more prone to wildfires and urged the government to strengthen fire readiness measures and “take urgent and effective action on climate change.”center_img One study showed that between September 2019 and January 2020 around 5.8 million hectares of broadleaf forest were burned in New South Wales and Victoria. This accounts for roughly 21 percent of the nation’s forested area, making this fire season proportionately the most devastating on record. “Halfway through Spring 2019 we realised that a very large part of the eastern Australian forest could be burned in this single season,” Matthias Boer, from the Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment at Western Sydney University, Penrith, told AFP. “The shock came from realising that this season was off the charts globally in terms of the percentage of the continental section of a forest biome that burned.”last_img read more

Men’s soccer season roundup: Although record disappointing, some bright spots in 2015

first_imgThe Wisconsin men’s soccer season came to a close on Nov. 8 as Indiana knocked them out of the Big Ten tournament 1-0. The loss marked the second consecutive season in which the Badgers failed to finish with a win percentage of at least .500. But a lot of positives can be taken from this season’s performances.The core of the team is still relatively young, setting Wisconsin up for the opportunity to excel in upcoming seasons. In terms of departures, the Badgers will need to find replacements to fill the voids of senior captains Drew Conner (midfield), Adam Lauko (defense) and Carl Schneider (defense).But compared to the 2014 season, in which the team failed to win a single game in Big Ten play, and only managed to produce three wins, significant improvements were made during this season. The Badgers finished in seventh place in the final conference standings, claiming a total of nine points — an improvement from the single point the team earned a season prior. Wisconsin also improved their win total to five this season.Four of those wins came on the road in 2015, as the Badgers proved to be a much better team playing away from the McClimon Complex. For some unexplainable reason, the team’s home record dropped considerably this season. Wisconsin claimed only one win in Madison, and that didn’t even occur until the final regular season game versus Northwestern.A major part of the team’s success this season was the emergence of sophomore midfielder Christopher Mueller. The Schaumburg, Illinois native led the team in points (15) and goals (5) on the season, including the game-winning goal in double overtime against Rutgers, which gave Wisconsin their first win of the season. Expect Mueller to be a major contributor to the Wisconsin attack in his final two seasons on the team.But Mueller isn’t the only sophomore that will have a major role to play in the next two seasons. Tom Barlow, Mark Segbers, Adrien Remeniuk, Alex Masbruch, Nick Jones, Mike Catalano and Enda O’Neill are all slated to be key pieces in the Wisconsin starting eleven next season. The youth trend should continue as Big Ten All-Freshman defender Sam Brotherton will likely hold down the center back role in defense throughout the entirety of his Wisconsin career.In terms of seniority, players like Matej Radonic, Brian Hail, and Luc Kazmierczak will have to serve as leaders during the 2016 season.It’s also expected that freshman Isaac Schlenker, freshman Elan Koenig, and sophomore Nikola Atlija will see more game time next year as the Badgers reload and refocus on getting back to a level capable of contending for the Big Ten crown.That young core means the future for the Wisconsin men’s soccer program looks bright on paper. The team, comprised mostly of freshmen and sophomores the last two seasons, is gaining valuable experience, and the growing process may finally have a chance to pay dividends in 2016.last_img read more