5-month-old baby swept by flashflood

first_imgThe cadaver of the infant was laterfound along the seaside of Barangay 35 around 6:20 a.m. on March 7./PN The victim’s father reported that hisson was carried by flashfloods following heavy rains here. Their house, locatedbeside the creek of the village, was carried away, police said. BACOLOD City – A five-month-old babydrowned in Barangay Taculing.center_img According to police investigators, theincident happened around 5:50 p.m. on March 6.last_img

Allardyce sticking to his guns

first_img Allardyce is wary of just how dangerous Roberto Martinez’s compact side can be. “We have to be aware and stop the service they give to the forwards, then when you have possession you have to make sure you use it correctly and exploit the spaces they do leave,” he said. “A key part for us will be trying to make sure we limit Everton’s attacks by stopping those players like Seamus Coleman and Leighton Baines, if he is fit, because they are very good at going forward with the ball.” The 6ft 3in forward offers a different focal point for the Hammers, but Allardyce insists that in itself will not necessarily mean switching to a more direct style. “We play slightly differently, in that we play more into Andy’s feet than we do into (Enner) Valencia or Sakho,” said the West Ham manager. “Valencia and Sakho are so pacy that we are a massive threat in behind the opposition when the midfield players like (Mark) Noble, (Alex) Song or (Stewart) Downing start sliding balls down the side of defenders, that has been a really big threat for us and on the back of that we have scored goals. “Whereas Andy is not such a big a threat in that area, he is a much bigger threat in terms of setting up attacks to get into the final third by playing into his feet or chest and not playing into his head. “No way do I tell a player to just knock it up to Andy’s head. I don’t want them to knock it up to Andy’s head, I want them to be talented enough to knock it into Andy’s feet or chest. “We want it on Andy’s head when it is getting crossed into the box because that is where he is at his best and where he can score a lot of goals, as Sakho has proved this season. “I think we have scored more headed goals than anybody else, even without Andy Carroll.” Everton have started to slowly build some momentum following an indifferent start to the campaign, and are unbeaten in six though all competitions since losing at Manchester United on October 5. Diafra Sakho, who had netted six goals to help West Ham climb to fourth in the Barclays Premier League, is a major doubt for Saturday’s trip to Merseyside after suffering a back problem while away on international duty with Senegal. Carroll looked lively when coming on as a late substitute in the goalless draw against Aston Villa, his first appearance since recovering from pre-season ankle surgery, and almost scored a winner with a late header. Sam Allardyce will tell his West Ham team to adapt but not abandon their dynamic attacking style should Andy Carroll once again lead the front line at Everton. Press Associationlast_img read more

Racism should be treated as seriously as match-fixing and doping – Holder

first_imgPLAYERS found guilty of racism should face the same penalties as match-fixers and dopers, says West Indies captain Jason Holder. While International Cricket Council (ICC) rules allow for a life ban for on-pitch racist abuse, culprits are rarely punished to that extent.“I don’t think the penalty for doping or corruption should be any different for racism,” Holder told BBC Sport.“If we’ve got issues within our sport, we must deal with them equally.”Under the ICC’s anti-racism policy, a first offence is usually punished with between four and eight suspension points. Two suspension points equate to a ban for one Test or two one-day internationals or two T20 international matches.Former Pakistan captain Sarfaraz Ahmed missed two one-day internationals and two Twenty20 matches as punishment for a racist remark to South Africa all-rounder Andile Phehlukwayo in 2019.Holder cited the experience of England’s Jofra Archer, who has been a target of racial remarks from the crowd both in home and away Tests, and team-mate Moeen Ali, who it is believed was targeted by India fans in a 2014 match because of his Pakistani background.Holder, whose team will take on England in a behind-closed-doors three-Test series starting on July 8 in Southampton, said that he believed that each international meeting could be preceded by reminders to both teams of their responsibilities around race.“In addition to having anti-doping briefings and anti-corruption briefings, maybe we should have an anti-racism feature before we start a series,” he added.“My message is more education needs to go around it.“I’ve not experienced any racial abuse first-hand but have heard or seen a few things around it. It’s something you just can’t stand for.” (BBC Sport)last_img read more