Protest against proposed bird sanctuary in Manipur

first_imgThe Manipur government’s plan to set up a bird sanctuary at the Loktak lake in Bishnupur district has met with stiff opposition from the villagers in nearby areas.A large number of residents of Thingnunggei village took out a massive procession against the government’s proposal on Sunday.“The villagers of Thingnunggei are poor and they have no other means of earning a livelihood except for catching fish and plucking vegetables from the lake. If fishing is banned in the lake, the villagers would starve. We are all for protection of birds, most of whom are migratory, but the new scheme should not be implemented at the cost of the poor villagers,” said one of the protesters.Declining number Thousands of migratory birds flock to the Loktak lake, the largest freshwater lake in north-eastern India, every year. However, in the past few years there has been a sharp decline in the number of migratory birds coming to the lake.Reports indicate that bird poachers are active in the area, targeting the winged guests. Officials of the forest department’s wildlife wing say in view of the widespread bird poaching at the lake, setting up of the sanctuary is a must. Birdwatchers on the other hand blame human intrusion, bird poaching and hydroelectric power project near the lake for the decline in the number of migratory birds and brow-antlered deer in the Keibul Lamjao national park in the vicinity.Brow-antlered deerSome decades ago, the villagers of the lake islets had agitated against setting up of the Keibul Lamjao National Park, the natural habitat of the endangered brow-antlered deer. They wanted the land demarcated for the park to be made available to them for cultivating paddy.Now, several years later, the latest census suggests that there are only 260 brow-antlered deer in the Keibul Lamjao national park.last_img read more

Moto M to launch in India today, may cost less than Rs 20,000

first_imgLenovo today is going to add another Moto phone, Moto M in India. The Moto M was launched in China last month and since India has been an important market for Moto it is coming to the country today. The phone was first launched at CNY 1,999 in China, which roughly translates to Rs 20,000. The company teased its launch in India on its Moto India twitter handle.Also Read: Motorola Moto Z review: The most underrated phone of 2016 Interestingly, the phone sports a full metal unibody design and is water resistant like the Moto G4 and G4 plus. The design is also quite similar with a rounded back and a 5.5 inch Full HD display in front; the same Octa core snapdragon 617 chipset and 3000mAh battery. So the major difference then remains with the fingerprint sensor placement.This may have come in response to many Moto fans and critics who pointed out that front button is a useless addition when on-screen home and back keys are the given way of navigation. It is like a home button that you can’t press and that is annoying at times. Then there was the plastic build, both on Moto G4 and G4 Plus that became a fodder for further analysis.Motorola (yeah Lenovo) fixes these things with Moto M. It had to be announced in India. The fingerprint sensor is placed at the back, the build is all metal (and water resistant), the RAM is upgraded to 3GB/4GB and the storage to 32GB/64GB. Then, there is a higher resolution 16megapixel camera in the rear with 1micrometer pixel size. It almost enters the Moto Z league.advertisementIts Metallic. Its Marvelous. And it could be yours very soon. Coming soon on Flipkart! #SomethingMagnificent pic.twitter.com/WccEK8AcLg Flipkart (@Flipkart) December 8, 2016Though, hinting from the China price, the Moto M will also carry a bigger price tag. And that also kind of jeopardizes the pricing of Lenovo smartphones that always manage to carry heftier specs. The Lenovo Z2 having Snapdragon 820 would actually cost the same.That said however, Moto phones grab an edge over its Lenovo counterparts by offering clean stock interface and water resistance with a curvier design. Like you, we are eagerly waiting for the new (read old) Moto design to rise from the ashes, in metal.Also Read: Moto G4 Plus review: Two steps forward, one step backlast_img read more

How Do You Measure the ROI of Social Media? You Don’t.

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Marketers considering ads always ask me the same thing: “How much should I spend?”It’s a good question — an important question — but it’s the wrong question. The right question is: “For every dollar I spend on ads, how much will I get back?”If you know the answer to that question, or at least have an educated guess, it matters less how much or little you can spend. To help you figure this out, we’re launching a free tool called the HubSpot Advertising ROI Calculator.This simple calculator allows you to explore how different metrics will impact the profit and ROI you can expect from ads. It will help you get the math right, so whether you have $100 to spend or $100,000, you won’t have to guess at the outcome.  Ready to give it a try? Click here to check out the HubSpot Advertising ROI Calculator.How to Plan for Ad Spend SuccessToo many marketers tell me about getting burnt by ads. They build an AdWords campaign to rank for important search terms, it drives clicks, traffic, and leads, but ultimately their ad spend outweighs the impact of the ads.These marketers end up learning a really expensive lesson — one that could be easily prevented by following these simple steps … 1) Do the math.Ads aren’t right for everyone. Some industries have extremely high competition with astronomical CPCs. Some products have too low of an average sales price for the economics to work.To determine if ads are worth your time, run the numbers specific to your business through our calculator. With the tool you can explore how a change in numbers, a lower CPC or higher close rate for example, will impact a campaign. This will give you a better idea of what it will take to create an ads campaign that makes you money.2) Never set it and forget it.Try not to look at ads as a shortcut. It’s possible to get to a place with ads where they become a recurring source of profit … but typically that’s not how things start.Don’t be surprised when a week after your campaign launches your ads aren’t generating tons of profit. Examine the data and make improvements to your ads targeting, creative, and landing pages.Incremental improvements in clickthrough rates and conversion rates can have a huge impact on profit. Use the ads calculator to explore the impact these changes could have. Watch your ads like a hawk for the first month and you’ll avoid big mistakes.3) Don’t place your ads in a vacuum.Ads act like a megaphone to amplify your marketing campaigns and content. The more complete and well developed your campaigns are, the better your ads will perform.Think about it: Which ads do you think perform better? Those promoting your homepage or those promoting a remarkable piece of content that helps someone?Bingo. Those promoting awesome content.Campaigns that use ads should be treated like other campaigns. Establish your goals first, build great content, focus your message and optimize your landing pages, then figure out how ads can help amplify your message. Taking this combined approach and only using ads as a strategic component of your marketing campaigns will pay off.So how much should you actually spend on ads?Assuming you’ve run the numbers and now know what you can expect in terms of profit and ROI, it’s time to launch a campaign. To do this you’ll have to make two budget decisions, regardless of where you are advertising:Total campaign budget or duration: How much do you plan to spend in total? How long will the ads run for? Be aware that if you don’t set a limit there will be no maximum or end date.Daily budget: How much do you want to spend a day?There are two ways I see most marketers use ads, short-term and long-term. Let’s take a look a both …Short-term ads. Budget = at least a few hundred dollars over a month.When marketers use ads for a short-term goal, it’s usually to jump start a campaign or boost content that needs a bump. These ad spends are generally smaller and shorter, but can be large.If you have a few hundred dollars to spend, spend it this way. Create a social post that promotes a piece of content and then use your ads to boost the post. Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn all have good solutions for this. Make sure you use the social network that gives you the best targeting for your persona and returns the most valuable leads. Measure this by assessing the quality of the leads generated after the campaign.Long-term ads. Budget = at least a few thousand dollars over a quarter.Ads can be a great solution in a pinch but if you really want to use ads strategically build them into your overall marketing strategy. This means more consistent, quarterly ad spends.Consider how potential customers make purchase decisions and use ads to influence them. This may mean always relying on search ads or retargeting to make sure prospects find you when they are ready to buy. You’re more likely to accumulate better data taking this approach, which will allow you to get more sophisticated in how you optimize your ad spend.Whatever budget you choose and whichever approach you take, make sure to ask a lot of questions about your ad spend. Even with the right approach, it’s easy to burn through money fast. Safeguard yourself by knowing what to expect and having clear expectations. Originally published Jul 19, 2016 6:00:00 AM, updated August 03 2017last_img read more

Is 22 Tweets-Per-Day the Optimum?

first_img Topics: Twitter Marketing Data 0.37 128160 3.67 11.84 Veronica 39.04 129017 136364 is that they allow you to do all sorts of interesting data analysis. nprpolitics techcrunch Tweets Per Day What is more interesting than that is what happens when we the graph average number of followers of users at various TPD levels. As you can see by the graph below, a sweet spot emerges. Originally published Mar 2, 2009 8:43:00 AM, updated October 20 2016 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack There are a small but siginificant number of users who tweet more than 150 times per day on average, but when added to the above graph they only continue the downward trend to the right. 316651 One of the great things about tools like 144201 Our database includes stats on more than 1.6 million Twitter users Nytimes The “peak” of the curve below is at about 22 tweets per day. Below is a graph of the distribution of those 1.6 million Twitter users’ average number of tweets per day. Notice that most users fall towards the low end of the range, meaning that most users only tweet a few times a day (or less). . 0.81 ijustine 9.64 103.39 the_real_shaq CNNBrk 7.85 177949 0.12 0.53 kevinrose 164864 0.38 User 4.422 148709 britneyspears Users who tweet between 10 and 50 times per day have more followers on average than those that tweet more or less frequently. 174635 ? How much is too much, and why do some people seem to do nothing all day but sit around posting to Twitter? algore 191126 wilw . 142835 twitter 263730 8.06 lancearmstrong 143299 Twitter Grader 129105 ev and the average number of followers for users in the database was 128965 3.48 how often you should be tweeting Ever wonder 205758 Followers 12.13 barackobama 3.98 19.65 mashable 7.33 stephenfry 156223 The average tweets per day (TPD) I measured was aplusk 6.16 226854 2.72last_img read more

Dwight From “The Office” Reveals Meaning Of Microsoft Bing [cartoon]

first_img Search Engines Originally published Jun 8, 2009 10:57:00 AM, updated October 20 2016 Liked it? Please share it on twitter. Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Topics:last_img read more

3 Secrets to Addictive Digital Platforms

first_imgTechCrunch Disrupt , CEO, DailyBooth , a conference that gathers web innovators in social media, mobile devices, and smart applications, hosted a compelling panel about the shift from traditional print to online media. and learn how to manage your company brand effectively using social media. Video: How to Use Social Media to Manage Your Company Brand Online Here are 3 key secrets revealed about addictive digital platforms: GE has always been known as one of the traditional marketing giants that garners the use of customary marketing techniques. However, Judy Hu, GE’s Global Executive Director for Advertising and Branding, explains that using social media can help “extend the brand and make it iconic. [GE] wants to build their brand and get their key message across to everyone.” Digital platforms can help small and large businesses alike expand their company to different demographics and distinguish their corporate image. Download the free video , CEO, Chatroulette , Global Executive Director, GE 3. Digital platforms cultivate brand building. GE’s crowd-sourcing effort 1. Users define content creation 2. Visual content is universal. The grounds of the discussion revolved around the transformation from conventional methods of reaching consumers to modern platforms that actually interact with users. Gone are the days where static media effectively delivered messages to consumers. Social media sites have dominated the playing field, where consumers choose what they want to view and who they want to engage with. Digital platforms such as YouTube and DailyBooth make it super-easy to upload videos and pictures and share them with friends. These can soon become addictive and viral as people consume content and pass it along further. Businesses can take advantage of this by opening up content creation to users, such as Brian Pokorny . , Founder, 4chan Brian Pokorny Christopher Poole content consumption. explains that “…you can talk in different ways through just visual imagery. Text is less of the focus now with both videos and photos, which can transcend languages, borders, and cultures.” Three of the panelists founded sites where visual imagery was dominant, and demonstrated the effectiveness of such sites in reducing boundaries in today’s global marketplace. Learn how to use social media to manage your company brand. Andrey Ternovskiy and Judy Hu Originally published May 25, 2010 7:33:00 PM, updated March 21 2013 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

11 Essential Elements of a Well-Designed Marketing Ebook

first_img Originally published Apr 6, 2012 2:39:00 PM, updated July 28 2017 Topics: Design How many ebooks does your marketing team have in its content arsenal? With the rise of tablet and e-reader popularity, ebooks are only growing in popularity. According to a newly released report by Pew Internet , in mid-December 2011, 17% of American adults had reported they read an ebook in the previous year; by February, 2012, the share increased to 21%. While we’ve always considered ebooks to be one of the best lead-gen content assets at a marketer’s disposal, the fact that on-the-go content is only carving out more of a place in today’s increasingly mobile world makes them an even smarter choice as a marketing offer .As a piece of long-form content, a lot of work must go into the creation of a well-crafted ebook . So today, let’s focus on design. How do you design an ebook that is reader-friendly, engaging, and at the same time supports your marketing goals? Let’s discuss the 11 essential elements that make up an effective marketing ebook design.  Importance of a Brand Style Guide First, a note about the role design should play in your content strategy. If ebook creation is (or you plan it to be) a big part of your content strategy, it’s wise to first spend some time establishing a consistent brand style guide to which all your marketing content — not just your ebooks, but also your presentations and other marketing collateral — adheres. This will give your publications a more professional, branded look which translates to a sense of credibility. Of course, the content itself is a huge contributing factor to the credibility and value of a publication, but even if you have quality content down pat, that doesn’t mean people still won’t judge an ebook by its cover ;)If you take a look at the ebooks HubSpot has launched in the past 6 months, for example, you’ll notice that they all have very consistent branding and design elements throughout. When you sit down with your marketing team and designer to decide on your brand style guide, establish rules for such design elements as fonts/sizes, color schemes, charts/graphs, borders for screenshots and images, headers, etc. Creating easy-to-follow guides and templates for your various marketing assets like ebooks, presentations, etc. will make it easy for you and your team to implement a consistent branding style throughout your marketing collateral. HubSpot, for example, has an ebook template created in InDesign to ensure our ebooks have a consistent look no matter who created them.Now let’s dive into the 11 essential design elements you should consider in your next ebook design. 11 Essential Elements of Effective Ebook Design 1) An Interesting, Descriptive Title Okay, so your title choice may not exactly be a design element, but choosing a title for any piece of content is definitely an art , and it shouldn’t be overlooked. The title is often the first thing someone judges before deciding whether to click on or read your ebook, especially when the content gets shared in social media. Choose a title that is both interesting and descriptive — that is, it should be indicative of what the reader will learn from reading the ebook.Unlike blog posts, ebooks are high-commitment pieces of content because of their length, so you need to make sure you’re demonstrating the value up front in a compelling way. For instance, one HubSpot ebook is titled 15 Business Blogging Mistakes & Easy Fixes with the subtitle, “How to Fix the Most Common Blogging Bloopers.” The main title is both descriptive and demonstrates value in itself, but the subtitle also makes it sound like an even more interesting read. 2) A Visual Cover So if we know that people will most definitely be judging your ebooks by their cover, you’ll want to make sure you create ones that are both visually appealing and coincide with your brand style guide. Consider how the visual revolution is playing out with sites like Pinterest cropping up and other social networks like Facebook and Google+ putting more of an emphasis on visual content , and the importance of enticing covers becomes even more evident. Make the title easy to read, include branding elements you decided on in your brand style guide, and feature an image. You’ll notice that HubSpot’s ebook covers , for example, follow the same layout and structure while each featuring a different relevant an interesting image. 3) Skill/Topic/Persona Tags Depending on your business and industry, you likely have a different buyer personas , whether you segment your target audience by demographics, skill level, topic interest, or something else. So if part of your strategy is to create content that is personalized for or targeted to these different audience segments, one helpful way to organize and differentiate between your content assets is through a tagging system. Incorporate your schema in your ebook design so your readers know which particular ebooks will be of interest to them, and which ebooks won’t. You can do this in a number of ways — through iconography, color schemes, or tags.HubSpot’s ebooks, for instance, are categorized by skill level — introductory, intermediate, or advanced — depending on the skill level of our readers. To identify which is which, we use a combination of color scheme and a category key to denote which ebooks are targeted for which skill level. If an ebook is intermediate level like our example here, the cover and color scheme throughout the book uses blue as the dominant color, and a page in the beginning of the book explains which type of audience would benefit from each skill level. Introductory content uses a charcoal color scheme, and advanced content uses an orange color scheme. We’ve also extended this tagging system to our blog. You’ll notice this particular blog post, for example, has also been tagged as ‘intermediate.’ 4) An Author Page Another design element you might want to include in your ebooks is an author page, particularly if you have multiple members of your team creating ebooks. For example, if the author of the ebook is an expert on that topic, an author page that highlights the author’s bio and relevancy to the topic is a great way to add credibility to the content. On your author page, include a brief bio of the author, a headshot, and if you choose to, a way for readers to get in touch with the author if they have questions, such as an email address, Twitter username, or phone number.As an added internal benefit, you might find that members of your team are more willing to spend time creating ebook content if they know their efforts will be recognized publicly through an author page. 5) A Table of Contents A staple for any book, both print or digital, be sure to include a table of contents in every ebook you publish. This not only gives readers a sense of how the ebook is organized, but it also makes it easy for them to reference individual chapters if they decide only certain ones are relevant to them or if they want to refer back to specific sections later. To make this even more user-friendly for your readers, some programs like InDesign make it possible for you to hyperlink chapters/sections, creating a sort of interactive table of contents and allowing readers to jump to a certain section of the ebook when they click on the corresponding link in the table of contents. 6) Chapter Title Pages Clearly distinguish one chapter to the next with chapter title pages. This gives readers a clear indication of their progress through the book and helps set the stage for the section they are about to read. It can also serve as a landing page for that interactive table of contents you may have set up in number 5. In our business blogging mistakes ebooks example, for instance, we organized the chapters by the 15 mistakes we highlight, and our chapter pages highlight which mistake the reader is going to learn about next.  7) Social Sharing Buttons We’ve talked before about the importance of including social sharing buttons on your marketing content. Sure, the landing page behind which you gate your ebook is a great place for these buttons, but why not also stamp them onto the pages of your ebooks as well? It makes sense, right? A potential reader might not feel comfortable sharing your ebook before they’ve read it and know they like the content, but while they’re reading it? That’s a different story.Add these buttons to each page of your ebook — either in the header or the footer — so readers can easily share the book with their social networks no matter how far through it they’ve read. Just be sure you’re sharing links to the ebook’s landing page — not thank-you page — if it’s gated content. HubSpot’s ebooks, for example, include social sharing buttons for LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter on each page. For help in creating these social media buttons for your ebooks, check out this handy guide . 8) Visual Elements Break up your “big chunks of copy” and “large blocks of text” with visual elements to emphasize or explain certain points more visually. We’re talking anything from headers, bolded text, and bullet points to screenshots, images, charts, and graphs. Furthermore, leverage content visualizations when appropriate to help you explain concepts that are difficult to explain through text and lend themselves to more visual explanations, as we did in this blog post , which is actually an ebook excerpt! Just be sure to keep your visuals in line with your brand style guide, translating images, graphs, and charts to conform to your guidelines in terms of style and color scheme. 9) Product/Service Call-Outs While ebooks can be catered to achieve certain goals, the way most marketers use ebooks is to generate new leads at the top of the funnel. To achieve this goal, your ebook content should be majorly educational — not product focused — in nature. But does that mean you can’t or shouldn’t sneak in a few mentions of your product or service into them when appropriate? Absolutely not! In fact, when people are just starting to learn about your business in the awareness stage of the sales cycle, they probably know very little about the products and services you offer.Use educational ebooks as an opportunity to connect your thought leadership with product awareness. One way to do this in your ebook content is with subtle product mentions and call-outs when you mention a problem or need in your ebook that your products or services address. How much of these should you include? The key here is balance. Make sure the educational value of the ebook makes up for your product awareness plugs. For example, in HubSpot’s educational ebook How to Attract Customers With Twitter, we add to the section of the ebook that discusses scheduling tweets and monitoring responses by calling to attention to the social media publishing tool available in HubSpot’s software, our paid offering. This lets readers with little or no knowledge of HubSpot’s software connect HubSpot’s thought leadership and expertise with its paid software. 10) Printer/Mobile-Friendliness While your ebook is a digital publication, you’ll likely be offering it as a downloadable file such as a PDF, and despite what you might think, many of the people who download will actually prefer to print it out and read it on paper rather than on a screen. For this reason, it’s important to make sure your ebooks are printer-friendly. For example, avoid designs that leverage double-page, horizontal layouts that don’t translate well to print. The best way to know if your design is printer-friendly? Print it yourself!Furthermore, you’ll also want to make sure your ebook file is mobile-friendly. Does your ebook PDF view well on a smartphone and various e-readers/tablets? Test it out!If you’re considering making your ebook available for sale through ebook marketplaces like the Kindle Store, things get a little bit more complicated . You’ll need to conform to the specific ebook format of that particular store, and you’ll likely need to make chan ges to the style, design, and file of your ebook. In general, you’ll need to modify your ebook to embody a very simple design with few visuals and limited formatting. Publishing services like Lulu.com can make this process more easily manageable. 11) A Final Call-to-Action The last critical element that should be a part of your ebook design is — you guessed it — a final call-to-action! After a reader has completed the ebook, what action do you want them to take next? Tell them!Perhaps you’d like to encourage them to move from the awareness stage of the sales cycle onto the evaluation stage of the sales cycle. In this case, feature a call-to-action for a middle-of-the-funnel stage offer on the last page of your ebook, introducing it to the reader in a way that is relevant and logical. In our 15 Business Blogging Mistakes ebook , for instance, we encourage readers to start a free 30-day trial of HubSpot’s software , relating it to the content of the ebook by emphasizing that readers will be able to try out HubSpot’s business blogging tools to help them fix the blogging mistakes they learned they are guilty of making. Do your ebooks have a consistent design that reflects your business’ branding? What other design elements would you add? Image Credit: Jonah Larsson Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

Help! My Sales Team Thinks Our Inbound Leads Suck

first_img Originally published Feb 12, 2013 2:00:00 PM, updated October 20 2016 I must have had the following conversation at least 50 times last year: “Mark, we love inbound marketing. We’ve completely overhauled our marketing so it aligns with the way prospects buy today, and we’re generating 10 times the leads we did in the past. It’s awesome. But my sales team does nothing but complain about these leads. They say the leads suck. What are we doing wrong?”Here’s what’s happening: Your typical salesperson has been honing his/her skills for years — sometimes decades — in the art and science of closing outbound leads. But inbound leads don’t act like outbound leads. So it’s not uncommon for inbound leads to look like they “suck” to your salespeople, when in fact, they’re just different. The “problems” your sales team has identified with your inbound leads are just signs pointing to the ways inbound leads act, think, and close differently than outbound leads do. Diagnose the “problem,” and your sales team can learn to work effectively with your new inbound leads. Here are my top five tips for transforming how your sales team approaches selling to inbound leads, and how Marketing can help.Tip #1: Don’t buy a list of companies in your target market.  Do generate lots of inbound leads and pass only the good fit companies to your sales team. Inbound marketing has turned the fit/pain funnel on its head. In an outbound model, companies start with a list of executives at a “perfect fit” company and bombard them with hundreds of calls and emails until 1% or 2% call back and admit they have pain. In an inbound model, all your leads have the pain your company solves. Otherwise, they would have never conducted that Google search, downloaded that whitepaper, or read that blog article that led them to you. The problem is that your company doesn’t sell to the entire world. Some percentage of these leads are just not a fit for your business. However, the inbound leads who are a fit are exceptional — and they close much faster and at a higher rate than your outbound opportunities.The problem here is that marketers get so excited to be generating hundreds — and sometimes thousands — of inbound leads each month, that they end up passing all these leads to sales. If Marketing passes the sales team 1,000 leads, only 100 of which are good, and Sales has to sift through 900 bad leads, they’re going to hate it, and they’re going to say things like, “These leads suck.” However, if Marketing can filter out the 900 less fit companies and pass along just the 100 good ones, their sales team will think they have the best marketing department in the world. As a result, Marketing and Sales must align to develop and implement a lead scoring system that makes sense and results in only good fit leads getting passed from Marketing to Sales.Tip #2: Don’t call high. Do call the inbound lead influencers, ask them what is going on, and then call high. Look … not every inbound lead is going to be a C-level executive. In fact, very few of them will be. You’re much more likely to get a mid-level manager, associate, or even an intern on the other end of the phone. So what does your typical salesperson think? “This isn’t a qualified buyer. This is an intern. These leads suck.”However, who do you think told the intern to do the Google search that led to your company? The C-suite. The inbound lead indicates that pain exists at that company — the pain you solve. So call the mid-level manager. Call the associate. Call the intern. But don’t try to sell them. You’re right — they’re not buyers. Instead, use that call to prepare yourself for the call with the executive. Ask them, “Why did you download that ebook? Why did you read that blog article? Who told you to conduct this research? Why? What is your boss’ key initiatives for 2013? What did your CEO talk about at the annual kick-off?” If you’re doing inbound marketing well, you’ll be surprised how much these leads trust you and how honest their answers will be.Now you’re in a position to call high. You don’t have to leave the typical voicemail …“Hi John, we help companies like you get more leads and customers from your website. Give me a call back so I can tell you more about ways we do this.” Instead, you can leave one that says …“Hi John, a number of people from your company have contacted me about effective lead generation strategies. I understand you’re hiring 10 new sales reps next quarter and need to increase lead generation by 35%. I’ve been working on a strategy with your team that I would like to run by you.” Now, which voicemail would make you more willing to call back?Tip #3:  Don’t lead with your company’s elevator pitch.  Do lead with your buyer’s interests.By the time they get passed on to your sales team, a typical inbound lead might have visited your website 15 times, read 11 blog articles, opened 3 emails from you, and downloaded 5 ebooks. They’re already several stages into the sales process before they’ve even spoken to someone from your company. So what do you think happens if a sales rep calls them up and leads with a stone-cold elevator pitch? It comes across as completely tone deaf to the prospect, right? It might even erode most of the trust your marketing team has worked so hard to build up. The lead hangs up on your salesperson, and again, your salesperson thinks, “These leads suck.”Instead, salespeople need to leverage all the data you’ve collected about your inbound leads in your contacts database. How they found your website, what pages they viewed most, what emails they opened and read, how often they shared your content on Twitter and Facebook: All of this tells you loads of information about what the prospect’s problems are and how you can help. Your salespeople should be using that information to open the conversation on the phone …Sales Rep: “Hi, Mary, this is Mark from HubSpot [pause because at this point Mary may start telling you how much they love your content and your company]. I noticed you downloaded our ebook on lead generation from LinkedIn. What specific questions did you have?”Mary: “Oh, I was just doing research. I didn’t know I’d actually get a call from a salesperson.”Sales Rep: “That’s okay. I’m actually looking at your company’s LinkedIn page right now and had two quick tips for you. Do you have a minute to go over them?”Mary wants to hear those tips. Mary will ask more questions. Mary will be impressed with how helpful and smart you are. Mary will wonder what she can buy from you. Congratulations! You no longer have a salesperson-prospect relationship, you have a doctor-patient relationship. Now you can diagnose whether you can help their company — and how.Tip #4: Don’t beg for an appointment.  Do qualify out non-buyers.  If you’ve never cold called before, you’re not missing out on much. Imagine a day where you dial the phone 100 times, leave 95 voicemail messages, and not one person calls you back. Of the five people who did pick up the phone, three hung up within the first five seconds. And when you do get somebody on the phone who’s willing to talk, it’s clear that he’s not really qualified to buy from you. But because you’re having such a lousy day of cold calling and feeling unloved — and because you don’t have enough leads to begin with, and beggars can’t be choosers — you book an appointment with them anyway. It happens more often than most salespeople are willing to admit.But with a steady stream of inbound leads flowing in, your salespeople can approach these initial conversations from a position of strength. Every minute you spend on the phone with an unqualified buyer is time you could be spending with a warm lead. Do build trust. Do understand the prospect’s needs. Do attempt to provoke pain if it doesn’t exist. But most importantly, do move on if they’re not a good fit. Thank your prospect for their time. Introduce them to someone else who can help if you know somebody. Encourage them to continue to enjoy your content. And quick … call that next inbound lead.Tip #5: Don’t “Always Be Closing.”Do “Always Be Helping.”Most salespeople, following the directive of the infamous movie Glengarry Glen Ross, adopt the rallying cry, “Always Be Closing.” But this is a disastrous approach to take with an inbound lead. The internet has shifted control from the salesperson to the buyer. People can research your company, research your competitors, understand your price, and sometimes even try your product — all without speaking to a salesperson. And by the time an inbound lead reaches your sales team, that’s exactly what that person has done.Sales should not start out by looking to close. They shouldn’t even be thinking about pitching your product. Instead, they should look to help the buyer. Strive to uncover the thing your buyer is worried about — the thing she’s stuck on — and if you find it, help her with it. Don’t try to tie it to your product. Just help them. Buyers don’t need to talk to Sales anymore. Make them want to talk to you because they trust you and you’ve been helpful in the past in solving their problems. If done correctly, your product and how it can help them will naturally come up at the right time.Just as the internet has changed life for the modern buyer (and the modern marketer), life has also changed for the modern salesperson. In all cases, it’s for the better. If your salespeople still complain that your inbound leads suck, try running an experiment. Choose a sales rep with an open mind, and tell them they need to make their goal this month from inbound leads alone, using the guidelines above. Then tell the rest of the team to watch as their colleague starts closing business faster and at a higher rate. Nothing succeeds like success. The rest of your team will soon follow suit.Don’t run a sales and marketing team that annoys people. Do run a sales and marketing team that people love. Topics: Passing Leads to Sales Don’t forget to share this post! 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How to Get Started with Pinterest, Write Captivating Intros, and More in HubSpot Content This Week

first_img Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Most of the time when I’m reading about marketing, I like to actually learn something I can take away and implement. While I certainly appreciate pontification about industry trends and inspirational thought leadership pieces at times, the content I truly find valuable is content that helps me do my job better. So this week, I put the HubSpot content roundup together with content that I know could help me — or any other marketer — do our jobs better. Hopefully, you’ll learn a thing or two that’ll make your job even easier this upcoming week! Let’s get a’learnin. How to Write an IntroductionOne of the things lots of writers struggle with — myself included — is writer’s block. You have a great blog post, ebook, or webinar idea and know exactly what you want to talk about in the body of your content … but you can’t seem to get the intro flowing. Well if that’s been you, you should definitely check out our Quick Tip to writing captivating introductions. With just three components, you’ll be banging out an intro and saying goodbye to writer’s block in no time.How to Use Pinterest for BusinessEven though Pinterest has been a hot social network for a while now, lots of marketers still haven’t jumped on the bandwagon. To get a comprehensive overview of the social network check out our Introduction to Pinterest for Business. We’ll answer questions like: What jargon do you need to know? How do you even sign up for an account? Will the social network help your marketing at all? So go on, download the ebook and get ready to pin!9 Do’s and Don’ts for Creating Outstanding Facebook Cover Photos [+Free Templates]One of the first places people look when they visit your Company Page on Facebook is at your Cover Photo. They can’t help it — it takes up almost a quarter of the page. So you want to make sure you’re making the most of that incredibly valuable real estate. Check out these nine do’s and dont’s for creating effective Cover Photos, and then get started making your own with our free social media cover photo templates. How to Convert Casual Blog Visitors Into Dedicated SubscribersIf you’ve been blogging for your company for a while, you most likely have the business blogging basics down pat. You’re writing effective blog posts, designing gorgeous calls-to-action, and racking up the social shares and comments … but you want to take your blog to the next level. You want your business blog to make a serious impact in your marketing results, but aren’t sure how. Look no further than our latest blog post on converting casual blog visitors into dedicated subscribers. Brush Up on Your Marketing TriviaLast but certainly not least, we have some fun content to help you learn about inbound marketing. Whether you’re an old pro who wants to teach your team about inbound or a newbie writing your first blog post, you’ll have a blast playing the Marketing Trivia game. In the game, we’ll walk you through each element of inbound marketing — and once you’ve finished, you can brag all you like on Twitter at #MktgTrivia. Click here to download the game, and then read up on the rules in this blog post. And that’s it for this week! What HubSpot content did you like this week, and what content do you want to see in the future?Image credit: Gibson Claire McGuire Regester Pinterest Marketing Originally published Sep 8, 2013 8:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017last_img read more

Perfecting the Sponsored Content Pitch for Advertisers: 3 Must Haves

first_img Originally published Oct 22, 2015 7:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Business Pitches As you consider implementing a sponsored content offering, it’s important to remember that like any other type of ad inventory, sponsored content won’t sell itself. Rather you need to have a sales team well-equipped to sell inbound to new and existing advertisers who may be less familiar with the methodology or benefits behind it.Internally, adopting an inbound methodology involves different areas of the business, including stakeholders from your marketing department, audience development or circulation team, editorial team, and beyond. Perhaps most important however, sales is a key piece of implementing any new advertiser program. This team is on the front line talking to potential advertisers and often the only opportunity your company has to drum up new business.Remember, just because your company has bought into inbound and sponsored content as a strategy doesn’t mean your advertisers have. But, shifting from more traditional advertising offerings to those involving inbound and sponsored content may involve a significant learning curve on the part of your sales team, and will likely require a good level of retraining. You need to spend time re-training your sales team to sell inbound campaigns by identifying what’s in it for the advertisers. Once they’ve gotten this, here area few ways you can really polish that pitch.Polishing the Sponsored Content Pitch1) Know Your Advertisers’ LanguagePublishers and their sales team need to be able to speak in terms that are understood by, and resonate with, their advertisers. Therefore, your team needs to have a firm grasp of the marketing funnel and how it works, what campaign ROI metrics advertisers care about, and which audience insights matter to advertisers (whether it’s purchase intent, demographics, or another set of metrics). For instance, while many publishers value—and therefore sell—reach and audience demographics, what advertisers fundamentally care about is how that’s going to increase their MQLs and sales prospects. In other words, think about how you can best sell what advertisers care about most, and don’t leave it up to their team to guess or draw conclusions. They might guess wrong.2) Be Able to Sell Your DatabaseNo, your sales team isn’t literally selling your list. But your readers are one of your biggest assets. Your sales team needs to have a much deeper understanding of what’s most valuable about your readers in the eyes of advertisers. What are they clicking on? What’s their most common job role or level? How long do they stay on your site? Which readers have converted on an offer before? All of this information helps you identify the people in your database with real purchase intent to highlight for advertisers, and can be presented in a number of ways—personas, charts, or even infographics.3) Know How to Map Your Content to the Buyer’s JourneyMake sure your sales team understands the buyers journey, especially as it applies to your readers and your advertisers. From there, they should be able to explain in detail what each piece of content you provide is, and how it aligns with that readers’ purchase decision process. Your sales team should also be able to communicate specifically how each reader will be nurtured from one stage to the next. In this conversation, if you’re able to include any funnel metrics you have available—conversion rates, expected ROIs etc—you’re in a good spot. Make sure to talk about the different types of offerings your company has (ebooks, guides, white papers, etc), what goals each achieve, and how your editorial team creates them.BONUS: Use Case StudiesWhat better sales tool could you have but great examples of how you’ve run these campaigns before, and how successful they’ve been? Put together case studies that advertisers can easily see replicated for themselves. Include highlights of things like MQL identification, cost per MQL, advertiser conversion rates, or net ROI so advertisers can see the possible impact it may have on their own bottom line.Selling sponsored content and inbound is a big shift for many publishers, and an even bigger shift for their advertisers. The best tool in your belt to get these programs up and running is a well informed and trained sales team. There may be a little more investment in the beginning, but these programs can pay out in dividends in the long run.  Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

HC asks for list of companies involved in milk adulteration

first_imgThe High Court on Wednesday directed the Bangladesh Food Safety Authority (BFSA) to submit a list of the companies involved in adulteration of milk and curd within 15 May.A bench of justice Nazrul Islam Talukder and justice KM Hafizul Alam passed the order after a report in this regard was submitted before the court.The report said harmful chemical lead and antibiotics were found in 96 samples of unpacked milk collected from the market.Besides, adulteration was evident in 18 of the 31 samples of packaged milk but the names of the milk-producing companies responsible for the adulteration were absent in the report.Deputy attorney general AKM Amin Uddin Manik stood for the state.On 11 February, the High Court directed the authorities concerned to conduct a survey to determine how much cow milk, dairy products and cow fodders containing bacteria, antibiotic, lead and pesticides are supplied across the country.The High Court bench of justice Nazrul Islam Talukder and justice K M Hafizul Alam came up with the order following a report published in different national dailies on adulterated milk.The HC also asked the authorities concerned to submit a report within 15 days.The food, agriculture, fisheries and livestock and health secretaries, cabinet secretary, all members of Bangladesh Food Safety Authority, members of Central Food Safety Management Coordination Committee, and chairman of Bangladesh Standards and Testing Institution (BSTI) were made respondents to the rule.Besides, the court issued a rule seeking explanation as to why the inaction and failure of the respondents to stop the adulteration of cow milk and dairy food would not be declared illegal and those who are mixing lead and pesticides with those would not be brought under the ambit of law.Different national dailies published a report on 10 February citing a survey report on the presence of pesticides, antibiotic and bacteria in raw cow milk.last_img read more