Summer of discontent: water crisis looms in Gujarat

first_imgSummer has just set in but Gujarat is already facing a water shortage. And it will only worsen in the next two months as the State’s main water sources like the Narmada dam, and dozens of other dams and reservoirs, are going dry. Ironically, Gujarat is faced with the crisis despite copious rains last monsoon.The government has assured that there will be no shortage of drinking water in any corner of the State. Narmada water was stopped for irrigation from March 15. Water Resources and Irrigation Minister Parbat Patel recently told the Assembly that the State has made adequate arrangements to ensure drinking water is available in every part of the State. But the picture is far from that. A crisis is already evident in villages, where water is now supplied once or twice a week.Despite the State’s claimed preparations, approximately 4,238 out of 18,000 villages in Gujarat are facing a severe crisis as their sources have either gone dry or are about to go dry. “More than 50% of the hand pumps in tribal pockets are not functional. Small tribal villages from north to central Gujarat are the worst hit,” said Congress spokesman Manish Doshi.Currently, the water level in the State’s main water body, the Sardar Sarovar dam on the Narmada, is at about 105 metres, roughly less than 50% of the dam’s normal average level. Moreover, the spread of water in the reservoir, which was across 214 km during the monsoon, has now shrunk to less than 90 km, and will shrink further in the summer. Now, the State is forced to use the dead stock of water from the dam.The Narmada is the main source of water for over 10,000 villages and 165 towns and cities in over a dozen districts in the State, notably in the water-starved and drought-prone Saurashtra, Kutch and north Gujarat regions. Moreover, in all other 203 dams and reservoirs across the State, the water level is less than 40%, and will dry up rapidly as summer peaks. A look at the region-wise figures of water storage available in the State’s dams: 15 dams in north Gujarat have 714.95 mcm (million cubic metres) storage, which is 37.15%. In 138 dams and water bodies in Saurashtra, only 656.97 mcm water is stored, which is just 25.93 %.On January 22, the State government announced that water in the Narmada dam had reached its lowest level in the last 13 years. So, from mid-March, Narmada water will not be supplied for irrigation. The State has now deployed State Reserved Police (SRP) personnel along the canals to stop farmers from taking water illegally from the Narmada canals.After stopping water for irrigation, the outflow of water has come down from around 9,000 cusecs early this week to around 4,900 cusecs now, with 4,300 cusecs for drinking purposes.Worse ahead“More than 50% villages in my area are facing water shortage and it will become more acute in April and May,” said Congress legislator Naushad Solanki from the Dasada constituency in Saurashtra. “Earlier, the government said no shortage in drinking water because the Narmada dam water has been reserved for drinking purposes and irrigation supply was curtailed. However, now, even drinking water supply is inadequate in villages,” said Sagar Rabari of the Gujarat Farmers’ Union, a civil society group fighting for farmers’ rights.Authorities have started rationalised supply to cities like Ahmedabad, Surat, Rajkot and Vadodara in order to supply more water to smaller towns and villages. “In Ahmedabad, which receives 1,420 million litres per day (MLD) from the Narmada and Kadana dams, among other resources, water supply is expected to be cut by 200 MLD,” a senior official in the State government said. South Gujarat has 27% less water compared to last year so there is an urgent need to rationalise use of water in Surat, which gets the highest water supply per capita, he added.The crisis seems to have its genesis upstream. According to State government officials, due to a weak monsoon in the Narmada catchment areas in Madhya Pradesh, Gujarat could only get 4.71 million acre feet (maft) of water, which is just 45% of the sanctioned supply of 9 maft is awarded by the Narmada Tribunal to the State.last_img read more

Hit India hard from ball one: South African coach Fletcher to his boys

first_imgWary of an Indian backlash after their humiliating loss in the series opener, South African batting coach Duncan Fletcher on Friday asked his players to hit visiting team “hard” from ball one in tomorrow’s second cricket one-dayer here.South Africa had crushed India by a huge margin of 135 runs in the first one-dayer at Durban on Wednesday.But going by India’s performance in the tour so far, South Africa cannot afford to relax as Mahendra Singh Dhoni and company have made a strong comeback in the three-match Test series, drawing it after losing the first Test by an innings.”Just got to be very wary that this happened in the Test series. But I don’t think it will. There seems to be a very good attitude amongst this one-day squad. They seem to have learnt their lesson. It’s just important that they go in there and hit India hard from ball one again,” Fletcher told media on the eve of the second ODI of the five-match series.”And make sure they don’t get complacent. India are quite an experienced side. Although they’ve got young players, if but they are pretty experienced. You got to be wary this fact.They know how to play out of these situations. South Africa have to be careful,” added the former England coach.Fletcher, however, is not happy with the home team’s handling of the Power-plays.”I’ve always believed they haven’t really believed when they have taken it. If sides or captains want, there are a lot of possibilities on how to take them.advertisement”It’s just been a misinterpretation as how you play within the Power Play. Sometimes you’ve got to look at it as there are other advantages of taking it at a certain time,” he said.Talking about the changing face of the game in the wake of Twenty20 cricket, Fletcher said: “It (T20) had an influence right through cricket. The players are going to be more attacking, but 50 overs is a lot of cricket.”If sides think they can go out there and adopt a Twenty20 attitude from ball one, sure on a given day they might be successful, but not over a period of time. They got to be very wary that in 50 overs there will be periods when you have to be more patient.” .Fletcher also said that international teams should have the ability to adjust to different conditions and playing surfaces and was satisfied with the Proteas team on this front.”I believe South Africa matches everyone as far as one-day cricket is concerned. They haven’t been fooled by the wicket they bowled on. They won’t bowl on that wicket very often, but when they get on it they play very very well.”When they go to India the wickets may be a bit slower and a bit flatter, but they just have to get used to it. They have to adapt a bit quicker. Bowlers at the international level have got to do that. They’ve got the skill and the ability to do that,” he said.Fletcher made no bones about the fact that South Africa was missing Jacques Kallis but said the upcoming all-rounders are really bright.”Obviously they’re going to have a problem with the all-rounder. South Africa always had plenty of all-rounders which has given them depth. They’ve got into the area that without Jacques Kallis they might need a bit of depth but the backup batters are good enough. All it needs a little bit more experience I guess,” he said without taking any names.last_img read more