H1N1 FLU BREAKING NEWS: UK death projections, tiered response plans, uninsured in New Jersey, lung damage, experimental IV antiviral, flu activity up in tropical areas

first_imgSep 4, 2009Britain scales back flu death projectionThe British government scaled back its projection of how many novel H1N1 deaths could occur, The Times of London reported today. In July it predicted 65,000 fatalities in a worst-case-scenario, but now the National Health Service (NHS) says fatalities could range between 3,000 and 19,000. Officials lowered the estimate because the symptoms of the virus are mild for most patients. The NHS’s chief medical officer said case numbers have not risen in Scotland, where school resumed 3 weeks ago.http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/health/Swine_flu/article6820841.eceSep 4 Times storyTiered epidemic plans could improve responseResponses to the novel H1N1 virus outbreak might be seen as alarmist, because many pandemic plans accounted for only a worst-case scenario, Peter Doshi, a doctoral student at Massachusetts Institute of Technology wrote in the British Medical Journal yesterday. Calibrated responses based on four types of risk assessments that take into account disease distribution and severity could build public trust and engage the public’s attention to warning messages, he wrote.http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2009-09/bmj-wtp090309.phpSep 3 British Medical Journal press releaseUninsured New Jersey residents to get free pandemic flu vaccineIn announcing new measures to curb the fall wave of pandemic flu, New Jersey officials said yesterday that the state will provide free novel H1N1 vaccine to the 1.3 million uninsured people. The free vaccines will be offered though public health clinics located in all New Jersey counties. Other response measures include a public education campaign, working with school districts to keep schools open, and partnering with districts to establish a voluntary vaccination program.Lung tissue in some fatal cases resembles H5N1 infectionPathologic investigation of lung tissue from patients who have died of pandemic H1N1 infections resembles that in those dying from H5N1 avian influenza, a scientist who has studied about 70 fatal cases told the Canadian Press. Dr Sherif Zaki, a pathologist at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said the level of lung damage makes it difficult to oxygenate patients. About a third of the patients had bacterial coinfections, and about 90% had underlying conditions such as obesity.Doctors reverse severe infection with experimental IV antiviralA 22-year-old woman with pandemic H1N1 infection and chemotherapy-induced immune compromise recovered from a severe infection after treatment with an experimental intravenous version of zanamivir, her doctors reported today in The Lancet. She had not responded to oseltamivir or nebulized zanamivir alongside antibiotics, hydrocortisone, and mechanical ventilation. Her doctors combined IV zanamivir with corticosteroids, which is controversial but is used in some respiratory distress cases.http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(09)61528-2/fulltextSep 4 Lancet reportWHO: flu activity increasing in many tropical regionsIn its weekly pandemic update today, the World Health Organization (WHO) said flu activity is widespread and increasing in many tropical regions of South and Southeast Asia as well as South America. Though flu activity is past its seasonal peak in some parts of the southern hemisphere, parts of Australia and South America are seeing sustained circulation. Japan is experiencing an early start to its flu season. The global number of deaths is at least 2,837, mostly from WHO’s Americas-region countries.http://www.who.int/csr/don/2009_09_04/en/index.htmlWHO pandemic update 64last_img read more

After tight battle in Big City Classic, Syracuse to meet Notre Dame again in upcoming Big East tournament

first_img Published on April 28, 2013 at 11:47 am Contact David: dbwilson@syr.edu | @DBWilson2 EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — For 45 minutes, nothing separated the nation’s No. 1 and No. 7 teams. Notre Dame’s staunch defense and superb goaltending illustrated why it was regarded as the team to beat heading into the final weeks of the season. Syracuse’s hustle and equally firm defense demonstrated why it could play with anyone.For the final 15 minutes of the Konica Minolta Big City Classic at MetLife Stadium, the Orange asserted itself as the better of the two — even if by a slim margin. And in less than a week they’ll go at it again.The Fighting Irish will have a chance to avenge its 10-4 loss to SU in East Rutherford, N.J., in just days, when the two meet in the first round of the Big East tournament in Villanova, Pa., on Thursday. The winner will advance to next Saturday’s Big East championship against the winner of the earlier semifinal game between the Wildcats and Georgetown.“Mentally we’ve got to get that edge back going into this next game because it’s really difficult to play a team you just beat, play them a few days later,” Syracuse head coach John Desko said. “It’s mental challenge for us as coaches and players.”For the first 15 minutes, the Orange and UND defenses traded blows, missed opportunities and made spectacular saves. SU midfielder Scott Loy freed himself up on the right side of the field, no defender within five yards. When he cranked up to shoot though, Notre Dame goaltender John Kemp slid over and deflected Loy’s shot with ease.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textFor 10 minutes, this is how things went. The game was even, as expected. Both Syracuse and the Irish found chances, but Kemp and SU goaltender Dominic Lamolinara positioned themselves in the way when they needed too. But for much of the first quarter, the stalwart defenses kept the opposition away from the cage.UND midfielder Tyler Kimball scrambled around atop the Irish offensive zone, but David Hamlin came in full pursuit. The Syracuse midfielder harassed Kimball, causing a turnover and keeping the teams level through one quarter.“When you come off a win, the tendency is to not evaluate the other team because whatever you did last time worked,” Desko. “I think we can’t do that as coaches. We have to have a Plan B ready.”Even as his defense collapsed in the fourth quarter, Notre Dame head coach Kevin Corrigan said he wouldn’t change anything up in practice this week. The Fighting Irish have played well enough all season to merit the No. 1 ranking. Saturday’s collapse was just “a manifestation of four quarters of bad lacrosse.”Said Corrigan: “We’ll come back on Friday – or Thursday – and try it again.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

IBIA to share betting information with MGA’s Sports Integrity Unit

first_imgShare StumbleUpon Submit Ray Wilson, AMLGS: Industry deserves praise for its reaction to a new normal July 23, 2020 Soft2Bet continues new market drive with Irokobet launch August 26, 2020 IBIA: Australia has made no progress on safeguarding sports integrity   July 28, 2020 Share Related Articles The International Betting Integrity Association (IBIA) has signed a betting integrity information sharing agreement with the Sports Integrity Unit, a new unit launched by the Malta Gaming Authority (MGA) this summer as part of an initiative to increase the focus on the fight against the manipulation of sports competitions.The Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) is the first agreement between the MGA’s new Unit and a betting monitoring system, which underlines the desire of both parties to tackle betting related corruption.  Khalid Ali (pictured at Betting on Sports 2019) is the IBIA CEO. He said: “The creation of the Sports Integrity Unit and its focus on tackling match-fixing is a very welcome move, which is why I am delighted to have reached this agreement with the MGA that will allow us to work collaboratively on integrity. “For its part, IBIA will utilise its unique global betting monitoring system, which includes many of the largest MGA licensed operators, to provide information on suspicious betting to the Unit with the aim of preventing sports betting related corruption.”Antonio Zerafa, the MGA’s Sports Integrity Officer, added: “The MGA has made the fight against the manipulation of sports competitions a core part of its licensing and regulatory policy. Working in partnership with other stakeholders, notably betting operators, is critical to the success of that approach and the MoU with IBIA is therefore of particular importance. “IBIA and its members bring a wealth of market and consumer data that will undoubtedly serve to significantly strengthen the information and intelligence gathering ability of the Unit.”It comes in the same week that the IBIA praised tennis authorities for allowing the continued sale of official live scoring data to betting operators for International Tennis Federation (ITF) matches at the $25k level. The organisation played a key role in revising initial proposals put forward by the sport’s Independent Review Panel (IRP), which suggested discontinuing the data for both $15k and $25k events.last_img read more