The Evolution of Display Connectors

first_imgDisplay connections are evolving to keep up with new video technology and data rates. See what lies ahead for the future.Chances are, you have a shoebox filled with a bunch of obsolete connectors collecting dust in your garage, or worse, your parents’ house. Each of these cables and display connectors can only fulfill one specific connection. You can’t mix a VGA cable with a tri-colored composite cord and expect it to work; the connections look and act differently from each other. This was the norm for years.Today, the trend is moving toward fewer display connectors that handle more. This will be great news for your parents, who will bug you a little less about clearing out those ratty shoeboxes. They’ll still bug you, just about other stuff.Connectors now are able to handle multiple signal formats, so they can carry video, audio, and data information while often being able to charge the connected device. This’ll be familiar to anyone who’s got a smartphone, and in fact, this connectivity trend is being driven by consumer devices like advanced phones and tablets. Compare this to a decade ago, where connections were driven by advances and needs of professional equipment.The interfaces through which we connect our devices are getting smaller, denser, and faster, much like the phones themselves, now sporting fewer ports. The interfaces can make decisions about display resolutions, audio formats, Ethernet connectivity, and can receive and send control signals, so you don’t have to sweat the details. All of these interfaces use Extended Display Identification Data which allows your video card to configure itself automatically. This is what makes your display rotate to landscape mode when you plug in your phone to display content on a TV. What’s more, wireless connections are also right around the corner.Image: Apple Thunderbolt ConnectorsThunderbolt is a great example of this technology, as is Mobile High-Definition Link (MHL) and DockPort, a USB connection over DisplayPort. MHL, a smaller version of HDMI carrying signal over Micro USB, can be used for a wide variety of applications, including using the phone as a game controller to replace standard hand-held ones. MHL can also be used in a phone-docking scenario to operate as a full-fledged computer. Other models that turn phones into tablets exist as well.Certain types of DisplayPort utilizing USB 3.0 have built-in chips that enable the interface to configure automatically to the connected system. The cables are also symmetrical so it doesn’t matter which way you plug it in. You’ve seen this on more modern iPhone chargers and Apple’s display connector.A Look Into The FutureAll this shouldn’t come as a shock to anyone who owns one or more of these devices. The problem is the looming inevitability of 4k and later, 8k footage, which will put an intense strain on these interfaces.4k video will become standard on the next generations of smart phones, so this issue is about to come to a head. Models released by LG, Sony and Samsung will all utilize playback through MHL and will come equipped with 13 megapixel cameras. It’s not just about servicing a greater array of pixels, though. Any developments in refresh rates, dynamic range, and color gamut will affect how much information needs to be pushed through these multi-purpose connectors.Let’s take a look at the two most common connectors, HDMI and DisplayPort, to see how they fare. HDMI can carry 4k video at 60p but is limited to 8-bit color only, according to the HDMI 1.4 and 2.0 specs. At higher formats, we’ll encounter speed problems in the actual connector portion of the signal chain.DisplayPort 1.2 is robust enough to handle 10-bit color with a 4k signal at 60p, running at a data rate of 21.6 Gb/s. DisplayPort 1.3, announced in September this year, will carry a maximum data rate of 32.4 Gb/s, utilizing the device’s four separate lanes running at 8.1 Gb/s each. It’s almost twice as fast as HDMI.Image: Displayport CableHelping DisplayPort achieve this is something called Display Stream Compression. As the name suggests, the technology condenses information packets coming to the monitor from the video card. The standard would support an 8k stream, although at a lower color space of 4:2:0. Once the video signal itself is taken care of, there would still be a fair amount of room to pass other devices such as Thunderbolt, USB and Ethernet connectivity through the connection.This gives us some ammunition when confronted with claims that a manufacturer’s products are “UltraHD ready.” Be sure to ask which interface is making the connection happen, as there are large differences between the current states of HDMI and DisplayPort technology. Many TVs contain HDMI but they may be an older specification that cannot carry as robust a signal.High dynamic range is something we’ll be looking for aside from just having large image support. As more entertainment gets streamed from what are essentially computers tuned to RGB color spaces, the throughput to display these images also demands more. It’s increasingly important to develop the specs properly to accommodate the highest quality possible.last_img read more

Valdez, PH volleyball take lessons from losses in AVC

first_imgSports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim She finished with 13 points versus the Taiwanese but was disappointed with how they lost their early third set lead.READ: AVC: Chinese-Taipei trumps Philippines for crack at 5th placeValdez said they just have to keep their heads high with the tournament about to wrap up.“We’ll just have to fight because we can still achieve great things if we just fight for it,” said Valdez in Filipino. “This is a game, there will be losers and there will be winners, but let’s just think of the brighter things and let’s hope that we can win.”ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES Pagasa: Storm intensifies as it nears PAR NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ “Definitely this is a challenge for us to be consistent, to be on top of our game every game,” said Valdez Tuesday at Alonte Sports Arena. “This is a learning experience for us.”READ: Thailand silences PH to advance to AVC semis FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingValdez, after putting up her tournament-high of 20 points in the Philippines’ win against Vietnam, labored for nine points, and converted on just 8-of-26 of her spike attempts against the Thais.The 24-year-old was visibly frustrated throughout the match as her attempts either bounced got blocked or just went awry. MOST READcenter_img Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo CONTRIBUTED PHOTOBIÑAN, Laguna—Philippine outside hitter Alyssa Valdez said their disappointing loss to Thailand in the AVC Asian Senior Women’s Volleyball Championship will serve as a lesson as they try to finish the tournament on a high note.But the following day, the volleybelles dropped another three-setter for a second straight game, this time to Chinese-Tapei.ADVERTISEMENT AVC: Chinese-Taipei trumps Philippines for crack at 5th place Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more