Former judge to probe BHU violence

first_imgThe Banaras Hindu University on Tuesday formed a high-power inquiry committee headed by a retired judge to probe the incident of lathicharge on protesting students and arson in the campus, which left several students, journalists and policemen injured.Meanwhile, Varanasi Divisional Commissioner Nitin Gokarn in his probe report submitted to the government is said to have blamed the BHU administration for not handling the incident, particularly the complaint of the molestation victim, in a sensitive manner and indicted the varsity for not taking timely action. The report submitted to Chief Secretary Rajiv Kumar, however, has not been made public.Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath had ordered the Divisional Commissioner and Varanasi ADG Vishwajit Mahapatra to probe the incident that took place on Saturday night.Promises actionBHU Vice-Chancellor Girish Chandra Tripathi said an inquiry committee headed by retired Allahabad High Court judge Justice V.K. Dikshit had been formed to probe the incident. Mr. Tripathi said the committee would shed light on ‘all aspects’ of the incident. “Whatever the recommendations of the committee, the University will take action on it,” he said.He said he would comment on the commissioner’s report after reading it.Amid speculation that the government had ordered a judicial probe, Uttar Pradesh Cabinet Minister Shrikant Sharma said only two existing probes stood in the BHU case — one by the ADG-Divisional Commissioner and the other by the District Magistrate of Varanasi. Mr. Sharma, however, told The Hindu that the CM had taken a serious view of the BHU incident and “to prevent such incidents in future, he appealed to the vice-chancellors of universities in U.P. to establish communication with students and identify those involved in cases of eve-teasing and take action against them.”A fine arts student of the BHU was molested by bike riders while she was returning to her hostel on Thursday evening. The victim alleged that instead of helping her the security guards on campus blamed her for not walking carefully in the dark while the warden questioned her character.Angered by this, scores of students, girls and boys, gathered at the main gate of the BHU for a protest which turned violent on Saturday after police lathi-charged the protesters, who the administration claimed included ‘anti-social elements.’last_img read more

LinkedIn Releases Offical Share Button

first_imgToday, LinkedIn, the social network targeted towards business professionals, released its offical share button . The button allows LinkedIn users to easily share content they find interesting and relevant with their network. Publishers can find instructions for how to add the share button on the Marketing Takeaway With all easily implemented options for sharing content such as Facebook, Twitter, Digg, Delicious, etc. it probably isn’t going to be the ease of execution that determines how successful LinkedIn’s share button is.  At 85 million users and a new users joining every second the success of LinkedIn’s share button is going to fall in the hands of it’s users.   Once you have taken the time to create remarkable content make sure that you are doing everything you can to share it with your entire network.  Since your LinkedIn network may find your content relevant this is an excellent way allow them to help you spread your content beyond your immediate reach.  Head on over to LinkedIn to try out your share button today. Originally published Nov 30, 2010 3:00:00 PM, updated October 20 2016center_img Social Media Engagement Since those connected on LinkedIn most likely share business interests, it is very likely that the LinkedIn share button becomes a standard for business related content.   Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack portion of the LinkedIn site.  LinkedIn is offering three options to choose from: a vertical button with a share counter, a horizontal button with a share counter, and a horizontal button without a counter.  To add a button to your website or blog all you need to do is choose a button style and copy and paste a few lines of code.  publishers Topics:last_img read more

Using Social Sharing Buttons Leads to 7x More Mentions [Data]

first_img Social Media Engagement Originally published Sep 13, 2011 1:01:00 PM, updated February 01 2017 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Social media can be a great promotional vehicle for sharing your content and helping it reach an extended audience beyond your direct network of fans, followers, and subscribers. But are you missing out on some low-hanging fruit to make sure you give your content what’s necessary to help it spread?When it comes to spreading content in social media, some of the easiest-to-pick pieces of low-hanging fruit are social sharing buttons. Adding social sharing buttons for sites like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Google+ to your website, blog articles, and landing pages is a simple way to encourage visitors to spread your content and reach even more potential customers.So if it’s so easy, everyone must be doing it, right? Wrong.According to a recent study conducted by SEO platform BrightEdge Technologies, the homepages of almost half of the top 10,000 websites studied (46.4%) had no social links or plugins installed.But what’s even more interesting is the impact of the social sharing buttons that were used on the other 53.6% of websites. Looking at the effect of social plugins on a website’s traffic and how much content is shared, BrightEdge also conducted analysis on over 4 million tweets. When studying how often a website using a Twitter sharing button was mentioned on Twitter, on average, a website with no Twitter share button was mentioned just four times. However, websites that did include a Twitter sharing button were mentioned 27 times, on average. Therefore, including a Twitter share button increased Twitter mentions sevenfold.Marketing TakeawayDon’t miss out on easy opportunities to help your content and messages spread. Adding sharing buttons to your website is simple, yet half of the top websites don’t do it.BrightEdge Technologies’ study focused on social sharing buttons on websites’ homepages. While a website’s homepage isn’t the only place marketers should be adding social sharing links, the study’s findings indicate just how powerful they can be. When incorporating social sharing buttons into your website, be sure to add them to any page you have content — landing pages, blog articles, product pages, etc. It’s an easy, sure-fire way to extend your reach.Have you added social sharing buttons to your content yet?Photo Credit: joyosity Topics:last_img read more

5 Deadly Twitter Sins to Avoid

first_imgThis is a guest blog post written by our friends Nikki and Tammy at MarketMeSuite, the free social media marketing dashboard.Twitter can be a great platform for many inbound marketers to connect with potential customers, maintain relationships with current customers, and generate new leads. But that’s not to say that all marketers are using it appropriately.To make sure you’re using it the right way, avoid these five deadly sins when utilizing Twitter as part of your inbound marketing program.1. Thou Shalt Not SPAMSpamming your followers with endless links to your own website is a sure path to a lack of interest and support and a distinct lack of appreciation. Do not rely upon automated direct messages. Yes, these types of messages are allowed by Twitter. But many — if not most — users find auto DMs both spammy and impersonal. More importantly, they are a dying feature. All sense of meaning and genuine feeling goes out the proverbial window when you send these robotic and generic thank you’s. Try to connect with as many of your followers as you can…personally. The bonus? An alternative message might be less of a hard sell, and as a result, more helpful. Consider saying, “Thanks for following! I can also be reached on @MarketMeHelp if you have any questions.”Don’t spam using hashtags. This is a big, nay HUGE, no-no. Some businesses see a trending hashtag on their Twitter feed and then add that hashtag to their own tweets in the often misguided hope that those following the trending hashtag will think will see their irrelevant tweet and think they are awesome. You are not awesome for using that hashtag in your tweet. Avoid doing this at all costs. Your rep will suffer, and it will appear painfully obvious to all that you are promoting where you should not. Reserve hashtag use only for instances when the hashtag is relevant to you and your tweets.2. Thou Shall Not DriftKeep your Twitter profile and bio up-to-date. Always. Complacency kills marketability. Any individual stumbling across an out-of-date page is not going to take you seriously, and it won’t do anything for your online business reputation, except deflate it. Not tweeting is also part of this sin. No one will be interested in following you if your last tweet was 17 days ago.Don’t be lazy about interacting with others. If someone takes the time to tweet to you, tweet back to them. It’s polite, and it builds up customer and prospect relationships. Too many businesses ignore tweets. Remember that @replies aren’t the only tweets you should look out for and reply to. There are several free, third-party Twitter apps that allow you to create search panes to monitor mentions of your business, brand, and industry topics to allow you to monitor conversations and participate when appropriate.3. Thou Shalt Not Blatantly Self-PromoteAlthough Twitter gives you the opportunity to spread your message, don’t use it purely for the purpose of promoting your business, products, and services. You need to keep your social profiles sounding organic and sounding real. Remember that social media implies that there is a human behind each tweet — a real person you can interact and engage with. Constantly pitching your followers with “Try our product. It’s the best!”-type messages will only annoy them. Instead, tweet relevant content to get that inbound marketing engine primed for success. If you’re desperate to get your product out there to this audience, consider retweeting others’ reviews. Because they are not written by you, this level of outside influence creates an interest and associated trust in your brand.4. Thou Shalt Not Use Only 140 CharactersTwitter’s message convention is inherently restrictive, and sometimes you need to compromise your communication to fit into the 140-character limitation. Consider spreading your longer messages over two or three tweets, instead of a single one. This is not the time to try haiku marketing if your tweet has value.5. Thou Shalt Not BashPeople tweet, post, comment, or blog about nasty things. This lack of civility happens to individuals and companies each and every day. The very worst thing you can do is react via Twitter in a defensive manner. It can do more damage to your reputation than ignoring the troll. Instead, consider sending a level-headed tweet that says something along the lines of “So sorry you feel that way. Is there anything I/we can do to change your mind?” or DM them with your email address where the conversation can take place privately. Tweeting uncomplimentary messages about your competition is also considered poor sportsmanship in the digital world. Unadulterated bashing of a competitor will actually create a loss in respect for you and your organization. No one likes overt arrogance and a self-righteous attitude. Keep your negative opinions to yourself, and act in a mature and reasonable manner. Marketing TakeawaySocial media can be a gold mine for lead generation, but it will be little more than a dud if abused. Be personal with your tweets, always interact, and never leave a customer without a response. Think to yourself: “How would I handle this if I were talking to the person face to face?” because your social media engagement needs to be just as real.What other deadly since should marketers avoid on Twitter?Image credit: Spec-ta-cles Twitter Marketing Topics: Originally published Oct 25, 2011 8:36:00 AM, updated October 20 2016 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

5 Simple Secrets to B2B Lead Generation on Facebook [SlideShare]

first_imgI once went to a marketing conference. I don’t remember the name of it.What I do remember is that some smart person presented about the difference between B2B and B2C marketing. Smart Guy said, “B2B is still P2P” (meaning person-to-person, not peer-to-peer illegal downloading ;).The thing is, I don’t remember his name either, so I can’t give him credit. Now, I like to strut around the office poofy-chested and pretend I came up with it … though at the time, I was placing palm to forehead and wondering why I wasn’t the cool person who strung those four words together. It’s so simple. Yet a lot of us B2B marketers still get hung up on what to say and how to act in social media. It’s as if selling to people who work at companies somehow regresses our interpersonal skills. It shouldn’t. There really isn’t that much of a difference, and we can rejoice knowing that we can continue going about business both online and off just as if we were speaking to one another — in person — over a BBQ frisbee and some iced tea at California Pizza Kitchen. And we’ve seen first hand how successful you can be on social media if you think of B2B like P2P. The HubSpot Facebook Page has amassed over 570,000 fans and generated 190,000 leads, and we’ve done that by focusing on people. We’ve also learned a few things along the way about what types of content to create and share on Facebook to generate those fans and leads. But you know how this whole inbound marketing thing works — you share your secrets with your audience. So that’s what we’re gonna do today. Take a cruise through the SlideShare presentation and blog post below to see what secrets we’ve uncovered. And, if you want to get your own copy plus a printable tip sheet, click here. Facebook Marketing Topics: Originally published Sep 30, 2013 8:00:00 AM, updated July 28 2017center_img 5 Simple Secrets to B2B Lead Generation on Facebook from HubSpot All-in-one Marketing Software1) You Don’t Need a Facebook Strategy. You Need a Content Strategy.At HubSpot, we create content like blog posts, presentations, templates, and ebooks that aim to make the jobs of marketers easier. All this content creation arms our social media manager with a library of resources to promote in unique ways on Facebook. Without all this helpful content, we’d simply have nothing interesting to post or advertise on Facebook, and we sure as heck wouldn’t generate any leads! You can’t play Scrabble without any letters, now can you?2) To Generate Leads, You Can’t Only Post Lead Gen Content.It just doesn’t work. The key to generating leads on Facebook is to post a variety of content that will sometimes address goals other than generating leads or driving sales. Aiming for “fluffier” goals like reach, awareness, buzz, customer satisfaction, and engagement (comments, likes, shares) are just as important as rigid lead gen or sales goals. They’re the stepping-stones to what you really want: more business. That’s why a balance is so important. No eyeballs –> no clicks –> no leads for you. 3) Have a Non-Lead Gen Goal for Every Post.Although our ultimate goal on Facebook is to generate leads all the leads all the time, we have immediate engagement goals for each post we publish, and those goals can vary. You can’t always address them all with one post. Sometimes we really want to encourage comments because we want feedback. Other times, we may strive to for a high volume of shares because we want a particular message to spread as far and wide as possible. We first focus on those eyeballs –> then we get those clicks –> then we get those leads. 4) Whatever You Do, Don’t Skimp on the Visuals.We may not always be sure what we’re posting will incite the interaction we desire, but one thing can be sure of is we’re better off posting a photo as opposed to a link, video, or plain ol’ status update.In a recent 30-day experiment, we found that the click-through rate of posts containing photos is 128% higher than the CTR of posts containing videos or links. We also know photos on Facebook generate 53% more Likes than the average post. That’s why, no matter what we’re trying to communicate, we try to do it visually. If our social media manager doesn’t have a pre-made image to work with, doggonit she’ll spend the time creating one or she’s banned from the beer fridge!5) Oh Yeah … You Probably Gotta Advertise.The people who “Like” our company already know about us, but that doesn’t mean they even know what we sell, or that they’re ideal future customers. Even though we’re approaching 600,000 fans, only a fraction of those people actually have the need and authority to buy our all-in-one software.That’s why we also pay to reach marketers who fit our target and are not yet connected to our page using various types of Facebook ads. But even though we advertise, we’re not advertising our software. We’re advertising all that helpful content we created. Jay Baer calls this pro tip “marketing your marketing.” You’re gonna wanna do that.These are just a few tips we have to create engaging Facebook content for B2B brands. Want to get more resources so you can do it yourself? Click here to download our presentation above and a printable tip sheet to help you produce engaging content every time you post. Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

Facebook Rolls Out Twitter-Like ‘Trending’ Topics Feature

first_img Originally published Jan 17, 2014 11:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Topics: Facebook Marketing Facebook released one more feature today — one that’s remarkably Twitter-like, actually.According to Mashable, the new tool is called “Trending,” and it’ll be showing up in a Facebook account near you in the next few weeks — on both mobile and desktop. The feed will show a list of popular topics, personalized to the user.Sound familiar? Take a look below for a sample of what it’ll look like:You’ll notice that, in addition to the topic, there’s a nice little description of the topic below, too.It’s also important to note that Trending isn’t necessarily pulling in just one particular article for each trending topic. If you click into a trending topic, you’ll see a list of several posts related to the topic.How Facebook Trending WorksYou may be wondering, “Hey, how do I get my content trending? That seems like some pretty good real estate.”Good question. Well, Facebook’s placing content up there based on a couple criteria:Which content is getting the most attention across the entire Facebook platform — this is being measured based on whether the topic has seen a “sharp increase in popularity,” rather than the net volume of content about the topic.Which content is more relevant for that particular user based on his or her interestsAnd now that you know that, you might be thinking, “Great, this means I have to buy a bunch of Facebook ads to get my content spiking in mentions.”Actually, that’s not true … at least not yet. Facebook’s not including sponsored or promoted content in their Trending topics right now. But who knows what the future has in store, so try to get in your Trending face time now.So … whaddya think of this new feature from Facebook?last_img read more

The Nonprofit Marketer’s Guide to the Millennial Persona

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack If your organization is engaging Millennials through content that’s based on their likes and dislikes, age, gender, jobs, brands they follow, stores they shop at, and ways they learn about and give to an organization, both online and offline, then you can stop reading and go get a cup of coffee.If you haven’t come up with a donor persona for Millennials and aren’t practicing inbound marketing to engage these tech-savvy Generation Y members, though, then keep reading. The reason? Because these young adults have shown a strong willingness in recent years to back causes they believe in — meaning they’re a prime demographic that could help your organization achieve its goals.To give you a clear idea of what your donor persona for this generation of volunteers and supporters should look like, let’s look at an example persona detailing the background, likes, interests, and past nonprofit work of a Millennial I know pretty well: me.An Example of a Millennial PersonaBelow, you’ll find a comprehensive profile based on myself to give you an idea of who your organization can and should be targeting.Now, this is by no means an absolute definition of the ideal Millennial your organization should be marketing to. What this example can do, though, is give you a glimpse into what a Millennial profile looks like, which can then inform how you develop your marketing strategy to reach these younger folks.Based on answers I’ve provided to questions featured in a previous post on how to create a persona using in-person interviews, here is my persona profile:Persona Name: “Techy Taylor”BackgroundGraduate of Northeastern University; studied communications and businessFour-time online fundraiserCurrent nonprofit marketer at technology company in MassachusettsDemographicsFemaleAge: 25Income between: $40,000- $75,000Location: UrbanIdentifiersEnthusiastic personalityTech-savvy (personally and professionally)On Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, LinkedIn, and InstagramGets news from New York Times and Huffington PostActive lifestyle (cyclist and rock climber)Shops online (preferred stores: Anthropologie, Zara, Gap, Amazon)Preferred Means to Interact With OrganizationsLikes to give online and/or fundraise; rarely gives via check or cashFollows several organizations on social media (mostly on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram)Will look for organizational information on a charity’s website or through word-of-mouth from a friendWill participate/fundraise in endurance events (i.e. cycling, 5Ks)Previously Supported Organizationscharity: waterCrohn’s and Colitis FoundationKrempels CenterAmerican Lung AssociationFrom this profile, your organization can understand how I like to give or fundraise, where I find my information, what other organizations I’ve supported in the past, and what type of lifestyle I live. Most of this information you can easily find online, but you can also capture this data from current constituents between the ages of 18-32 in focus groups, phone interviews, or even through a simple online survey.How to Connect With MillennialsNow that you know what a rough example of a Millennial persona looks like, you must understand where they are looking for information, how they use social media (including which channels), and — most importantly — what connects them to a cause and why they care so much to take action and support it in order to create a comprehensive persona.Millennials, like myself, are looking for a few important things when supporting or engaging with an organization:They want to get their hands dirty.Hannah Ackerman, a Millennial HubSpotter and Co-Founder of the Stahili Foundation in Kenya, says, “I’ve found that Millennials are more willing than any other generation to be first in line to volunteer their time.” If volunteering is available through your organization, let these young philanthropists go out in the field and see where the impact is actually happening, whether domestic or abroad.They want to gain professional experience.Internships are a dime a dozen, but contributing to the success of an organization by using their current skills — from accounting, to marketing, to writing — can provide Millennials not only a great personal experience, but also an insightful professional one. Plus, this generation knows that philanthropic efforts on their resumes can help them secure jobs down the line, so remember that they’re just as career-oriented as older generations when putting your persona together.They want to be able to share information socially.Data has shown that 50% of Millennials share information about charities they support with their Facebook friends, according to a recent Blackbaud study. Your next prospective advocate/donor is very likely the social friend of a current constituent. So, make it easy for them to share images, videos, and results of the organization’s work via your website or social accounts.They want to be recognized for hard work.Anum Hussain, another Millennial HubSpotter and Director of Marketing at MIST, sums up how her organization tailored its marketing for members of Generation Y.”Millennials want to be recognized, and our marketing efforts [as an organization] need to capitalize on this to help drive activity. So, when formulating our Facebook strategy, we put a strong focus on photographing all our events so students can see high-quality photos of themselves participating and be able to show off the action shots of them on their on walls. Also, when launching promotional videos, we try to incorporate B-roll from our events so students can feel a sense of fame. And when revamping our website (still in progress), we put an emphasis on having a ‘Hall of Fame’ for student recognition.”However you decide to capture this information about your Millennial donor base, just know doing so will help you create an effective marketing strategy that can engage Millennials and turn them into donors, fundraisers, event registrants, members volunteers and organizational advocates.How does your organization engage Millennials? Originally published Feb 4, 2014 4:00:00 PM, updated February 01 2017 Nonprofit Marketing Topics:last_img read more

Google Kills Authorship, Photos and All

first_img Originally published Aug 29, 2014 9:17:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Google Updates Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Topics: First it was Authorship photos. Now, it’s the whole shebang.Yep, that’s right — Google Authorship is over. According to a Google+ post yesterday by Google Webmaster Tools’ John Mueller, Google is removing authorship results from search and won’t be tracking the rel=author tag data anymore (it’ll be treated like any other type of markup on your website, and “won’t cause problems,” according to Mueller). And the changes seem to be immediate. This search used to return results that looked like this (pre-Authorship photo removal):Now results look like a throwback to 2011:But search results won’t be exactly like they were in 2011. Users will see Google+ posts in the main results and in the sidebar from their connections — and the results seem to look very similar to the Authorship design:On the “Death of Google Authorship”, note Google+ posts still get both ‘authorship’ and author photos (brands too): pic.twitter.com/p9yFLSA919— dan barker (@danbarker) August 29, 2014Many of us are wondering what gives, Google. Why would the search giant do away with Authorship? Why Is Authorship Going Away? In Mueller’s post, he says the reason Google Authorship is getting the boot is because of users. Apparently it wasn’t that helpful for users, and even ended up distracting them. And according to their tests, “removing Authorship generally does not seem to reduce traffic to sites. Nor does it increase clicks on ads.”Mueller got more specific about what went wrong with Authorship in a conversation with Search Engine Land. From three years of test data, Google found two main reasons to ax Authorship:1) It had low publisher and webmaster adoption. In the link above, Search Engine Land showcases some original data around Authorship adoption. They found that lots of people still weren’t using Authorship, or if they were using it, it wasn’t set up properly.But if you’ve ever set up Authorship, it makes sense. Though there were some easy-to-use tools to help you set up Authorship, if you didn’t have those tools, it was a hassle and a half to get it set up. As a result, lots of people didn’t set it up properly — or at all. 2) Users didn’t find value in it.Besides being hard to set up without the right tools, Authorship wasn’t getting the results Google hoped. When they announced the removal of Authorship photos, Google said that there was little effect on clickthrough rates with Authorship photos removed. The combination of low adoption and low impact on search made it clear to Google that Authorship as we know it should go … but that doesn’t mean you’re going to stop seeing photos in search anytime soon. Authorship for Google+ Instead?Frankly, the most interesting part of this whole story is that Google+ posts from your connections will now look like Authorship did — so this change might be an aggressive ploy to get more and more people on Google+. With people trying to get any edge in the rankings they can, some people may default to ramping up their Google+ presence in the absence of Authorship.So what should you do? Should you be doubling down on Google+ in the hopes of some more traffic to your site?The biggest thing I’d urge you to do is to not panic. This does not spell the end of SEO. This does not mean your site is suddenly going to tank in the rankings. It just means that you have to tweak your marketing activities.Maybe you’ll ramp up your Google+ promotions and presence, but the core of your marketing will stay the same — creating content people love on your website. Like with any other distribution platform, Google gets to make — and change — the rules of its platform. But if you’re focusing the majority of your time on building your marketing for your audience, and then making smaller changes as social networks, search engines, and distribution platforms change their algorithms, you’ll weather the storm just fine. last_img read more

The Pros & Cons of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram & Other Social Networks [Infographic]

first_img Originally published Apr 30, 2016 8:00:00 AM, updated June 30 2017 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Nowadays, social media is one of the main channels used by companies to reach their target audiences. But with so many different social networks available, how do you choose which will work best for you?It’s not a one-size-fits-all solution.For example, recent research has shown that teens and millennials are moving away from Facebook and into other social networks like Instagram and Snapchat. So if you’re primarily targeting teens, you may want to focus your resources on building a stronger presence on those networks.Click here to learn about using social media in every stage of the funnel.To learn more about each social network’s strengths and weaknesses, check out the infographic below from Visage. It’ll cover the key stats, pros, and cons for Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and Snapchat. Acknowledging these can help you create and publish the most engaging content possible on the networks that work for you.184Save184Save Topics: Facebook Marketinglast_img read more

What Makes Content Compelling? An Analysis of 3 Top-Performing Articles [Infographic]

first_img Content Creation Originally published May 12, 2016 6:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Inbound is no longer something entirely foreign to marketing teams: Globally, three out of four marketers prioritize an inbound approach.This means that brands are producing content at an accelerated rate, and in order to remain competitive, you need to consistently produce something that is compelling enough to generate a ton of shares. However, is this kind of guaranteed success even possible?Fractl recently turned to Chip and Dan Heath’s SUCCESS model from Made to Stick: Why Some Content Ideas Survive and Others Die to determine if there’s a concrete formula behind what elevates something from good to great.We began our analysis by selecting three of our most successful content marketing efforts to date. In total, the following three campaigns earned 2,300 press mentions and more than 140,000 social shares:”Hotel Hygiene Exposed”: We collected samples from nine different hotels and tested them through a third-party laboratory to answer one simple question: Which hotel rooms are the dirtiest?”Reverse Photoshopping Comic Covers”: Comic books depict vastly different figures (think men with massive biceps and women with incredibly tiny waists), so we used Photoshop to see what familiar superheros would look like if they reflected the average American body type.”Sexually Suggestive Emojis”: We scraped Twitter to discover how users are expressing themselves with flirtatious and sexually suggestive emojis across Europe and the United States.Below I’ll walk you through the Heath brothers’ six principles — simple, unexpected, concrete, credible, emotional, and stories — and explain how they were used throughout these campaigns to help you generate similar, highly shareable content.6 Principles of Successful Ideas1) SimpleTo gain your audience’s attention quickly, connect everything to one point so that a key concept is easily understood. For instance, in the case of emojis post, we condensed a month of tweets from the United States and more than 50 European countries into 14 easy-to-read charts and graphs. With help from these visuals, readers can easily identify global trends in how these emojis are used in less than 10 minutes.2) UnexpectedAnother easy way to earn someone’s attention? Offer data that disproves an easily held assumption. In the case of hotel hygiene post, lab testing allowed us to surprise readers with a shocking finding: The nicest hotels actually had the most germs.3) ConcreteThe Heath brothers say something is “concrete” in its ability to be described through sensory language. For the photoshopping post, we didn’t need to rely on a ton of additional content to visualize the campaign’s core message other than presenting the before and after images — the exaggerated body proportions next to each other served as powerful standalones.4) CredibleReaders want to see data that is trustworthy, and teaming with outside agencies is a great way to boost authority. For the hotel hygiene post, we boosted credibility by using a third-party lab to test the four samples collected from the nine different hotels.5) Emotional As much as you can boost credibility through numbers, remember that audiences have a desire to make a personal connection with content, as well. In the case of the photoshopping post, body image is already a highly emotional topic, so connecting the campaign to this much larger issue added an additional layer that helped boost shares.6) StoriesDuring production, continually ask yourself one question: Would I share this campaign with my friends? Your content should tell a story — and some of the best content reveals more than one story.Identifying staggering data points is an easy way to uncover multiple stories. In the emojis post, the fact that the gender division becomes especially striking when looking at which users are tweeting the more suggestive emoji combinations could lead to a much larger discussion.The biggest takeaway from our research? Although there is no one-size-fits all formula, aligning content to fit these six principles can help you produce campaigns that will earn high-quality links and shares.Check out the infographic below for additional insights from the study. It takes a closer look at key emotional drivers for each campaign, the different ways your content can earn credibility, what makes something visually appealing, and more. 113Save 113Savelast_img read more

A Brief Timeline of the History of Blogging

first_imgjust setting up my twttr— 🚶🏽jack (@jack) March 21, 2006 “NO PETS ALLOWED. We smuggled him in. It was awesome. Felt all undercover.” Source: Adam KontrasAs the sun set on the nineties, blogging began to have quite an impact on many lives. People were starting to figure out how to monetize their blogs — which we’ll get into in a bit — and the stage was set for businesses and individuals alike to take bloggers seriously.2002: A big year for bloggingThe early 2000s saw a few significant events within the blogging realm. Technorati, one of the first blog search engines (but is today a company of “advertising technology specialists”), launched in February 2002.That month, blogger Heather B. Armstrong was fired for writing about her colleagues on her personal blog, Dooce.com. While it’s not clear if she was the first blogger to be terminated because of her personal website’s content, it sparked a conversation about the privacy and freedom of expression for bloggers.The subject arose again in 2004, when Congressional aide and controversial blogger Jessica Cutler would experience the same fate as Armstrong. Cutler, however, blogged anonymously until her identity was revealed by the website Wonkette.The year 2002 also saw the dawn of “Mommy Bloggers,” which largely consisted of mothers blogging about parenting, aiming to create a sense of support and learning for their readers. Melinda Roberts founded TheMommyBlog.com — “one of the original mom blogs,” she writes — that April, creating a category that would continue to take storm for over a decade.The following month, Newsweek predicted that blogs will replace traditional media and, rather in December of that year, it partially came to fruition, when Talking Points Memo broke the written transcript of Trent Lott’s infamous call into “Larry King Live” — when Lott illustriously sang the praises of Strom Thurmond. Blog entries like these would serve as a precursor to live blogging, which took shape the following year.In August, Blog Ads was launched by Pressflex LLC. Less than a year later, Google would debut AdSense, which paired blogs with relevant advertisements (at the discretion of the blogger). Being able to advertise on blogs was a major milestone for bloggers, as it created the opportunity to monetize their work. It set the stage for blogs to be sponsored by major brands that fit their respective credos, or receive free products in exchange for endorsements or reviews. Blogging was turning into a business — and soon, a small population of bloggers would be using what used to be a hobby as their primary source of income.The tumultuous Gawker — which New York Magazine cited as the initiation of gossip blogs — also launched in December 2002, only to cease operations in August 2016 after a high-profile legal battle.2003: The momentum continuesTypePad and WordPress launched in 2003, continuing the trend of providing platform options to a growing number of bloggers. That’s the same year that live blogging is estimated to have started — the Guardian was one of the first outlets on record to make use of live blogging during the 2003 prime minister’s question time. The BBC refers to this blogging activity as “live text,” and has frequently used it for sporting events.WordPress, c. 2005. Source: Wayback MachineTypePad, c. 2003. Source: Wayback MachineFebruary 2003 also marked Google’s acquisition of Pyra Labs — the makers of Blogger. That was a sign of the growing business of blogging, particularly in the wake of the monetization programs that launched the previous year.The early 2000s showed the first signs of a rise in political blogs. In 2003, for example, several traditional media outlets were encouraging staff writers and columnists to double as “cyberjournalists,” as Matt Welch called them in a piece for the Columbia Journalism Review. It reflected a growing number of political bloggers, with many seasoned reporters looking to blogging for opinion and beat outlets.That climate primed the blogosphere for what would follow in the latter half of the decade, when the perspectives and analyses of political bloggers began to be preferred sources of information on current events. The line between traditional media and the blogosphere would start to bend, as bloggers were fated to become members of the press.2004 – 2005: Video and the pressDespite the earliest video blogs being recorded in 2000, it wasn’t until the middle part of the decade that visual content really had the opportunity to take root. In February 2004, videographer Steve Garfield — who went on to be one of the Web’s first video bloggers declared it to be the “year of the video blog.”As fate would have it, YouTube launched only a year later in February 2005, shortly thereafter inviting the public to upload their own videos. But it wasn’t always what people associate it with now — it actually began as a short-lived dating site, where singles could use videos to introduce themselves and state their romantic criteria.YouTube, c. 2005. Source: Wayback MachineBut once YouTube turned its focus to general video uploads (which seemed to take effect by June 2005), it was part of a series of developments that showed the growing credibility of the online user. With ample resources already built for writers, developers were starting to address other content creators.And it wasn’t just developers who were lending credibility these online users. In March 2005, blogger Garrett Graff was the first to be granted White House press credentials.That might have been when the line between news reporting and blogging began to diminish, which some attribute to the launch of the Huffington Post that May. It began as what one case study a “political forum” — and the Washington Post called it a “group blog” in a 2007 profile — but is today one of the highest-profile content aggregators.Huffington Post is largely a mix of syndicated material and original content from staffers, columnists, and unpaid bloggers. Visit the website, though, and you’ll land on a page of global headlines, lending the visual impression that it’s a news outlet.It comes as no surprise that one of Huffington Post’s co-founders, Jonah Peretti, went on to co-found BuzzFeed. Though BuzzFeed wouldn’t refer to itself as a content aggregator — it instead identifies as “a cross-platform, global network for news and entertainment” — it contains a similar vast range of content and, despite having an editorial staff, anyone can post to the site.These newer platforms raised the question: “Is it a newspaper, or is it a blog?” And as the 21st century progressed, the answer to that question wouldn’t become any clearer.2006-2007: The rise of microblogging and rulesThe start of life in 140 characters (or less) began in March 2006, when Twitter co-founder and CEO Jack Dorsey sent out the world’s first tweet. Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Bloggingcenter_img Greetings, readers. Welcome to the HubSpot Marketing Blog.We’re very happy to have you here. You might not realize it, but getting here was no easy task. Today, in 2016, I blog for a living, which is pretty great. But were it not for the long, twisty journey that got blogging to its current state, I might not be here. You might not be reading this.We’ve found that there’s quite a history behind blogs. According to the documentation we uncovered — and will share with you below — they’ve been around since 1994. They looked a lot different back then, and had many different names and meanings.Download HubSpot’s new State of Inbound report here. Merriam Webster currently defines a blog as “a web site on which someone writes about personal opinions, activities, and experiences.” Remember that — it’s going to come in handy later. But first, let’s talk about how we got here.The Blogging VernacularThe early vocabulary and semantics around blogging are more than a little muddy. As the practice developed, some of the more popular monikers were “weblog,” “personal web page,” and “online diary.” We’ll dive into each of these a bit as we explore the more primitive days of blogging.Now, we simply say “blog” — that’s a pretty popular term in our vocabulary. But what it means continues to change. Bloggers have dozens of platforms and formats available (fun fact: HubSpot has a blogging platform, too), and there’s no longer a standard for what a blog is supposed to look like.And their former look and feel was dictated by the language people used to use to describe the act of blogging. As you’ll see below, the word is primarily rooted in the idea of a log on the web. At one time, in fact, blogging was somewhat restrictive and limited to web-only subject matter.Luckily, we’ve evolved and expanded how and why we blog since then. One day, someone figured out that we don’t have to stick to strictly technical topics when we put things on the Internet. (And thank goodness — remember that thing I said about blogging for a living?)So, let’s see if we can better understand how that all took place. Grab some popcorn — you’re in for a 22-year-long tale.The History of Blogging1994-1997: The early stagesThere’s a bit of debate around the first stages of blogging, much like the rest of its history — in the first half of the nineties, for example, there wasn’t a ton of online record-keeping, and most primitive blogs are either now archived or nowhere to be found.Many of these original bloggers — despite not having yet earned that title — were the same people who first understood the value of the World Wide Web in the 1980s. One of them was then-Swarthmore-College undergrad, Justin Hall, who created a site called links.net in January 1994. It was essentially a review of HTML examples he came across from various online links, but it was enough for the New York Times Magazine to dub him the “founding father of personal bloggers”.In that article, Hall brought up the semantics of blogging, and how he was assigned many titles during his primary days online (some of which are hilariously documented here).“When I first started [blogging], they called it a personal home page,” he said, “then they said I’m one of the first Web diarists, and now I’m one of the first Web bloggers.”That same year, Claudio Pinhanez (who today is a Social Data Analytics Senior Manager at IBM) began to log short entries into what he called an “Open Diary.”But it wasn’t until December 1997 that the term “weblog” came to be. It was first used by Jorn Barger, creator of the website Robot Wisdom. He pioneered the term to describe a “log” of his internet activity, much like Hall did in 1994, which largely amounted to a list of the links he visited.That may have set the tone for the new era of blogging that would follow less than a year later, when blogging-specific platforms began to debut.1998-2001: More resources for bloggersThe later part of the nineties saw an uprising in resources created just for bloggers. One of them, Open Diary, launched in October 1998 and became one of the most pivotal blogging platforms — its name, was a nod to its open, community approach to blogging, as Open Diary was the first of its kind to have a membership model that allowed members of the community to comment on the work of others.Open Diary, c. 1999. Source: Wayback Machine In 1999 — though no one is quite sure exactly when — then-programmer Peter Merholz (who later went on to head up design at Groupon, OpenTable, and Jawbone, among others) shortened the term “weblog” to “blog.”It was part of a period that displayed an influx of blogging opportunities, with each platform attempting to boast its own unique set of features for a particular audience. In 1999 alone, Blogger, (which would go on to be acquired by Google), LiveJournal, and Xanga all launched.Blogger, c. 1999. Source: Wayback Machine LiveJournal, c. 1999. Source: Wayback MachineXanga, c. 2000. Source: Wayback MachineXanga (for whom Twitter co-founder Biz Stone once served as creative director) actually began as a social networking site — sometimes compared to MySpace — and didn’t add blogging features until 2000.This period of time also saw some of the first rumored video blogs. In January 2000, a man named Adam Kontras accompanied a written blog post with a video that updated friends and family on what he was doing. That November, professor Adrian Miles posted what some speculate to be one of the first video blogs, as well, calling it a “vog.” Originally published Sep 13, 2016 8:00:00 AM, updated July 28 2017 It was the introduction of microblogging — sharing stories, news, and other types of content in the smallest format possible. (And these 140 characters will soon look different — check out Twitter’s looming changes.)Microblogging continued to gain momentum in February 2007 with the launch of Tumblr — yet another blogging platform that encouraged users to be brief. It was built, wrote former CNET reporter Josh Lowensohn, for those “who feel they may not have enough content or time to write a full blog, yet still want to write and share links and media.”But with the introduction of short-form, real-time information sharing also came increasingly visceral communication. There would be countless mean tweets, as well as harmful comments left on blogs. It got to a point where, in March 2007, new media mogul Tim O’Reilly proposed a Blogger’s Code of Conduct in response to threatening comments that a friend had received on her blog. The rules were as follows:Take responsibility not just for your own words, but for the comments you allow on your blog.Label your tolerance level for abusive comments.Consider eliminating anonymous comments.Ignore the trolls.Take the conversation offline, and talk directly, or find an intermediary who can do so.If you know someone who is behaving badly, tell them so.Don’t say anything online that you wouldn’t say in person.It showed that the blogosphere had come a long way since the 1998 introduction of Open Diary. Being able to comment on blogs was becoming less of a novelty, and more a point of contention. Several years later — in 2013 — the Huffington Post finally took a cue from rule #3 on the code of conduct, banning anonymous comments on its content and requiring commenters to link their feedback to a Facebook profile.2008-2011: Blogging Dark AgesDuring this period of four years, there weren’t many major events that propelled how or why people blogged.There were a few developments of note, however. In January 2009, the White House blog debuted.Later that year, the film Julie & Julia premiered, which followed the success of one food blogger whose online work eventually became a book. It was one of the first pop cultural references to the professional success of bloggers, and stood to inspire others — by 2010, 11% of bloggers reported earning their primary income from blogging.Google also made some changes that would impact bloggers in 2011 with its rollout of the “Panda” algorithm change. Its purpose was to lower the rank of sites with what Moz called “thin content,” which hurt bloggers producing content that Google deemed to be of lower quality. A lot of that had to do with bloggers having a lack of inbound links — a link to your website that comes from another one. (My colleague, Lindsay Kolowich, wrote more about that here.) Without many sites linking to these blogs, Google’s algorithm would begin to interpret them as less relevant.2012: Medium is foundedIn August 2012, a co-founder of Pyra Labs — the creators of Blogger — Evan Williams, created Medium: One of the newest blogging platforms.Today, Medium is more than that. People can use it to write and publish original content, like most other blogging platforms. But Medium is continuing to blur the line between news reporting and blogging. In fact, on its website, the company describes itself as serving up “daily news reimagined, straight from the people who are making and living it.”It was a notable introduction of decentralized content: A concept that allows users to share their work that has been published elsewhere on a content creation platform. That’s different than sharing links on social media, for example, where limited content is displayed. Instead, the full text and images of the work are shared, with the original author and source credited, on a site different from its origin.It might sound kind of confusing and pointless. But my colleague, Sam Mallikarjunan, explains the benefits of doing something like that in his article, “Why Medium Works.” In sum: Medium has roughly three million viewers, all sharing and reading content. Does your blog have that kind of reach? If it doesn’t, you can reach Medium’s vast audience by syndicating your own content on their platform, drawing more attention to your work.The same year that Medium launched, LinkedIn introduced its Influencers program, which recruited notable business figures to guest blog on LinkedIn’s publishing platform. Eventually, that platform became open to all LinkedIn members in 2014 — HubSpot’s Ginny Mineo discussed that development here, and how it fit into the “self-publishing pie.”Though LinkedIn’s platform worked a bit differently than Medium’s — users can’t re-post full bodies of work in the same seamless way on the former — it does provide another outlet for people to share original content with an audience much larger than they may have received on their own domains. HubSpot’s VP of Marketing, Meghan Anderson, writes more about the positive outcomes of that kind of strategy here.Last month saw the latest development of the blogging realm — the creators of WordPress announced they would be rolling out the .blog domain. Until November 9, users have to apply for one of the highly-coveted domains. I tried applying for one, and found out that it’ll cost me $250 for a combined application and renewal fee. If for some reason I don’t get it, I’m told I’ll get my money back, or if other people apply for it, we’ll all have to bid for it in an auction.But here’s the cool thing about .blog — even though it was made by the creators of WordPress, you don’t have to use the WordPress platform in order to build a blog on that domain.“The domain registrations are open to anyone,” wrote Adario Strange of Mashable, “regardless of publishing platform.”We’ll be watching this domain unfolds, and are eager to see how it contributes to the evolution of content.What’s Next?I don’t know about you, but after diving into the history of blogging, I’m pretty excited to see what its future looks like.Of course, it probably helps that blogging is my line of work. But I’m certainly not alone. Here at HubSpot, our content team has at least three full-time bloggers, and there are an increasing number of job titles that either indicate or include a blogging as a major function.It makes sense, when you look at the state of blogging now. It’s an integral part of marketing and content strategy, and has even shown to increase lead flow up to 700% for some businesses.How blogging continues to change will determine what our careers look like, and I encourage all marketers — corporate or otherwise — to blog on behalf of their respective brands. It might seem like a lot of work, but if the evolution of blogging has indicated nothing else, it’s that the sphere will only continue to expand.And that’s something marketers should continue to pay attention to — not just the growth of blogging, but how many different interpretations of it exist. Just look at Facebook Live, Facebook Instant Articles, and Snapchat Stories against the context of the dictionary definition of a blog from above: “a web site on which someone writes about personal opinions, activities, and experiences.” Replace “writes about” with “shares,” and you could make the case that most of today’s content platforms — including social media networks — are their very own versions of blogs.Want to learn more about the future of blogging and marketing as a whole? Check out the latest edition of our State of Inbound report here. (Image Credit: 1998-2001, 2002, 2003, 2004-2005, 2006-2007, 2008-2011, 2012.)How do you envision the future of blogging? Share your thoughts and ideas in the comments below.  last_img read more

Live Desktop Broadcasts, Mid-Roll Video Ads & More: 7 Facebook Changes You May Have Missed

first_img Topics: Facebook Marketing Originally published Jan 16, 2017 8:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 In December 2016, Facebook co-founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg stated that Facebook has evolved from a traditional social media network into a new type of media company — one that offers a hybrid technology and news platform where content creators and readers publish, share, and talk about what’s happening in the world.The announcement marks a shift from Zuckerberg’s previous statements that Facebook would not become a media company, and the significance is meaningful. Facebook has started taking greater responsibility for content shared on the platform, and over the past several months, it has rolled out many new features that are highly relevant for content creators and social media managers to learn more about.We know it’s challenging to keep up with all of the breaking technology news out there, so we’ve compiled a list of recent changes and new features to Facebook for marketers to plan for.7 New Facebook Features You May Have MissedJanuary 2017Facebook Journalism ProjectFacebook cemented its role as a new kind of media company with the announcement of the Facebook Journalism Project, its initiative to collaborate more closely with journalists and content creators publishing on the platform.According to Facebook Director of Product Fidji Simo, here’s how the Facebook Journalism Project will work:1) Facebook will work with news outlets to develop new ways of creating and distributing content on the platform.Facebook wants to work with news organizations to help make new content formats, such as Facebook Live, 360 video, and Instant Articles, work better for publishers. Simo also mentions an interest in creating new products that better suit readers who are getting news from the platform — approximately 66% of Facebook users. One feature Facebook is launching under this initiative is the ability for publishers to share multiple Instant Articles in a single post, like a mini digital newspaper. Here’s what it will look like:Source: Facebook 2) Facebook will provide partner journalists more tools for analyzing content performance.Facebook Page administrators can now designate contributors so different journalists can post content on the platform, similar to a traditional newsroom. Additionally, the Facebook Journalism Project will provide more video analytics insights for publishers on the platform. Now, video content creators will be able to see more meaningful metrics for how live and regular videos perform on Facebook, such as total minutes viewed and total engagements.Source: Facebook3) Facebook will continue its initiative to fight fake news and promote greater news literacy.After news broke that fake news stories outperformed real news stories on the platform during the U.S. election, Facebook announced new initiatives to make it harder to publish and easier to identify hoax news. The initiative include working with third-party fact checkers, disrupting financial incentives for hoaxers to post these stories, and making it easy for Facebook users to dispute content that they believe is fake. This system will make the content appear lower in the News Feed, produce a warning to readers that the content is under review, and the content can’t be promoted or turned into an ad. Here’s how disputed stories and warnings will appear in the News Feed:Source: FacebookThe Facebook Journalism Project was just recently announced, and we’ll report back on any new publishing formats or changes as they evolve. For now, content creators should experiment with new capabilities and analytics as they become available in order to better measure their social media strategy’s efficacy. Video insights in particular will be highly useful as it becomes easier for marketers to create more video content. Facebook Live Broadcasts From ComputersFacebook Live, which lets users broadcast live video from their mobile phones directly onto the News Feed, launched in May 2016. It quickly experienced rapid growth, and Facebook recently announced that Pages will now be able to broadcast live video from computers in addition to mobile phones.This update will make it easier for users to go live, which has its pros and cons. Filming from a laptop or desktop computer keeps the camera steadier than holding a mobile phone, which improves video quality for broadcasters. On the other hand, part of Facebook Live’s appeal is in the ability to start recording a remarkable event at a moment’s notice while you’re on the go. If Facebook Live videos are staged and filmed statically from a computer, will they be as popular among viewers? I asked HubSpot Social Media Marketing Manager Marissa Emanuele what she thought of the latest changes to Facebook Live. “The ability to broadcast Facebook Live from your laptop will certainly change the content landscape. They’re moving away from the real time/in the moment feel, and shifting to a more professional, polished tone. This could drive more consumer adoption in the future, as it can feel more natural to be on your laptop’s webcam versus holding a camera,” she explained.Mid-Roll Video AdvertisementsRecode reported that Facebook will start giving video content creators the option to insert ads into videos at least 90 seconds in length after viewers have watched them for at least 20 seconds. Facebook sources said the platform would sell the ads and share 55% of the sales with publishers — the same share that YouTube offers.Facebook users watch 100 million hours of video per day, and most video content creators haven’t generated money because Facebook hasn’t permitted ads that run before the video content starts (as is on YouTube). When these mid-roll advertisements launch, publishers will have to create highly engaging content in order to a) get viewers to watch for at least 20 seconds, and b) continue watching the video after the ad plays.“Mid-roll video advertisements will incentivize marketers to create video content that doesn’t just chase vanity metrics (such as views) but also focuses on retention,” Emanuele notes. “This should push all of us to create stronger content that resonates with our audiences.”For now, marketers should beef up their video marketing skills if they want to monetize their content when this feature becomes available.August 2016More Independent Messenger PlatformFacebook’s messaging app, Messenger, has 1 billion monthly active users around the world, and Facebook has been evolving the app into a content sharing and communicating platform in its own right.In 2015, users could start signing up for Messenger without a Facebook account. In June 2016, Messenger for Android users could start sending and receiving SMS messages. Most recently, Messenger started testing a new “Add Contact” feature that allows users to connect with people on the app without becoming friends on Facebook.Here’s what that looks like:Source: BuzzFeedWith over 4 billion monthly active users around globe, messaging apps are growing rapidly and changing the way people communicate, even outside social networks. The new features Messenger is unrolling make it more independent from Facebook itself and make it easier for new users to start communicating on the platform. Businesses are starting to use messaging apps for customer service and communication, and Facebook is making it easier for Messenger to become a giant in that space, without even the need for a Facebook account. Social media managers should start thinking about the evolving way their audience prefers to communicate and if Messenger, or another messaging app like WeChat or WhatsApp, would be a good fit.June 2016More Content From Family and Friends in the News FeedFacebook changed its News Feed algorithm to prioritize organic content from users’ Facebook Friends over content from Pages and other publishers. This move represents an effort on Facebook’s part to maintain user interest and engagement by showing them more of the content they want from the people they know, but it represents a potentially big blow to content creators who rely on Facebook for referral traffic.For an idea of how influential Facebook is for publishers, consider this: Parse.ly found that Facebook makes up 41% of all referral traffic, which is more than Google properties. With this algorithm change in mind, content creators should ramp up their other traffic strategies, such as organic search engine optimization and email marketing to make up for traffic that may take a dip from Facebook. Marketers should also invest in quality Facebook content creation and post photos, videos, and links that followers will want to share with their circles to drive social media engagement that way.April 2016Save to Facebook From Around the WebSave to Facebook was introduced in 2014, and it’s essentially Facebook’s version of Pocket or Evernote Web Clipper: It lets users save Facebook posts for coming back to and consuming at a later time. Two years later, roughly 250 million people are using this feature, and Facebook announced a new button to make it even more popular. Developers can add a Save button to any web content so visitors can save articles for viewing the next time they’re on Facebook, even if they’re looking at the content on a different website.Here’s what it looks like in action:Source: The VergeMarketers could add these buttons to their articles to drive more article views and time spent on-page for busy scrollers looking to save content for reading on their commute or after work hours. “Save to Facebook is a dream come true for long form content marketers,” says Emanuele. “You no longer need to worry about closing the deal immediately. Instead, users will be able to save meaningful content that they want to read later, meaning your content doesn’t need to be created for quick, immediate consumption.”March 2016Live Video in the News FeedFacebook determined that users spent 3X more time watching Facebook Live videos that regular videos, so they announced that they would begin ranking them higher in the News Feed in response to users’ preferences.Brands who are recording live videos have the opportunity to drive even more engagement with this shift in priorities, which in turn helps their content be discovered and shared more widely. Users can also get notified when Pages they follow start recording live, so if live video isn’t part of marketers’ strategies already, it’s a great way to earn more meaningful engagement on the platform. If marketers are looking for inspiration, here’s a blog post rounding up examples of great Facebook Live videos.What’s AheadFacebook changes its platform and rolls out new products all the time, so we’ll keep marketers informed as the social network turned news company continues to evolve. In the meantime, content creators should experiment with new features to see if audiences like engaging with them. For more ideas how brands can use Facebook to meet their goals, check out this blog post.What’s your favorite new Facebook feature? Share with us in the comments below. Don’t forget to share this post!last_img read more

Offshore Energy Launches Improved Website

first_imgOffshore Energy kicks off its 10th anniversary year with a bang and is proud to announce the launch of its new and improved website on www.offshore-energy.biz. Sleek design, easy navigation and updated functionality mean a better customer oriented website.“High customer satisfaction has always been one of our main goals. In the past ten years we have always tried to serve our clients the best we could. The new website is the result of an extensive research that led to a combination of innovative digital technology and a new look and feel that facilitates our clients in the best possible way,” stated Annemieke den Otter, business unit manager events at Navingo, responsible for the organization of Offshore Energy Exhibition & Conference.The new website offers visitors a structured overview of what the possibilities are for taking part during Offshore Energy Exhibition & Conference, what visitors can expect as well as background information. An integrated exhibitor portal, a clear overview of business opportunities and soon also detailed information on the exhibition floor plan, the program and conference speakers, among other things, bring the website to a higher level. The improved navigation and the expanded features allow for a user-friendly experience.The website was developed with internet marketing company HVMP.Offshore Energy Exhibition & ConferenceOffshore Energy Exhibition & Conference (OEEC) is one of Europe’s leading offshore energy events. It is unique in bringing together the oil & gas, offshore wind and marine energy industry. With the industry in transition OEEC offers offshore energy professionals the ideal meeting place to network, discuss and learn about the future of energy.OEEC 2017 will be held at Amsterdam RAI Exhibition and Convention Centre on 9, 10, 11 October 2017.last_img read more