Why Did God Create Jupiter?

first_imgDr. Jerry Bergman has taught biology, genetics, chemistry, biochemistry, anthropology, geology, and microbiology at several colleges and universities including for over 40 years at Bowling Green State University, Medical College of Ohio where he was a research associate in experimental pathology, and The University of Toledo. He is a graduate of the Medical College of Ohio, Wayne State University in Detroit, the University of Toledo, and Bowling Green State University. He has over 1,300 publications in 12 languages and 40 books and monographs. His books and textbooks that include chapters that he authored, are in over 1,500 college libraries in 27 countries. So far over 80,000 copies of the 40 books and monographs that he has authored or co-authored are in print. For more articles by Dr Bergman, see his Author Profile.(Visited 682 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Some Evolutionists Explain Our Solar System’s Unique Arrangement by Mimicking Velikovsky’s Ideasby Jerry Bergman, PhDA cover story in New Scientist on May 25 discusses the Juno spacecraft, an “audacious mission circling Jupiter’s poles” that arrived in 2016 and is schedule to orbit Jupiter until 2021. In this article, writers Leah Crane and Richard Webb give a remarkable role to the largest planet that has worked out for our benefit. They state that Jupiter is “the biggest and perhaps most important planet in the solar system…. And might even ultimately be responsible for life on the earth.”[1] To understand why, we must look at the solar system as a functioning unit, and not as a haphazard grouping of planets independently operating separately. The study of the solar system as a system has increasingly supported the conclusion that life is not about just being in the “habitable zone,” but is intricately connected with the arrangement of all the other planets.The most well-documented example of interdependence is the research indicating that our moon is required for life on Earth. There are many reasons for this. For example—unlike at Venus and Mars, which both lack a large moon—our moon’s gravitational influence helps to ensure that Earth’s spin axis is stable at an inclination of 23.5 degrees with respect to the plane of its orbit. This results in seasons. As a result, our climate variations have remained very modest throughout Earth’s history. Stabilization of the Earth’s rotation on its axis by the moon allows for a far more stable, life-friendly climate. The Earth’s tilt, called its obliquity, has not varied by much more than a few degrees for most of Earth’s recent history. Obliquity stability is necessary for climate stability, thus for human life.[2]In 1994, Jupiter disrupted Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 and then absorbed the impacts of all 23 fragments, which would have devastated Earth.Jupiter as a Protective ShieldOne theory is Jupiter, as is believed true of all of the planets, especially Saturn, Neptune and Uranus, helps to protect the Earth from damage caused by asteroids, meteorites and comets. Astrobiologist Kevin Grazier disputes this notion. “It has been widely reported that Jupiter has a profound role in shielding the terrestrial planets from comet impacts in the solar system, ….(a phenomenon often referred to as the ‘Jupiter as shield’ concept).”[3] Grazier’s own computer simulation has challenged this common assumption, but has noted another reason for Jupiter’s importance to Earth. He simulated the behavior of10,000 particles in each of the jovian inter-planet gaps for the cases of full-mass and embryo planets for up to 100 My. The results of these simulations predict a number of phenomena that not only discount the “Jupiter as shield” concept, they also predict that in a Solar System like ours, large gas giants like Saturn and Jupiter had a different, and potentially even more important, role … delivering the volatile-laden material required for the formation of life.[4]Simulation studies are problematic because they make many assumptions when designing the study, such as the need to consider all relevant conditions in the simulation that could influence the outcome.Although Webb and Crane in the New Scientist article do not mention the theory that Jupiter protects Earth from impacts, they agree with Grazier that the planet may have been responsible for sending water to the Earth.[5] The Earth is known as the water planet because it contains far more liquid water than any other planet in our solar system. Nonetheless, many observers still prefer the shield theory for many reasons. One study of the planets finds that, although asteroids, meteorites and comets regularly crash into most of the planets, comparatively few large objects have struck the Earth since its creation. The ‘Jupiter as shield’ explanation argues that most objects that would otherwise strike the Earth are pulled away from the path that allows them to reach the Earth, deflecting meteorites and other large objects.[6]As Crane and Webb correctly note, Jupiter is enormous, 140,000 kilometers across, or close to 11 times Earth’s diameter. It is not only the largest planet in our solar system, but, they claim, may even be one of the largest planets in the known universe that is very distant from its star. Although most extrasolar planets discovered so far tend to be gas giants, they are located very close to their star, unlike Jupiter. We must keep in mind that we have only explored a few planets around a few nearby stars, not the entire universe.[7] Furthermore, if the “Jupiter as shield” theory is correct, some of Jupiter’s 79 satellites contribute to the effect. One of them is larger than the planet Mercury (Ganymede) and two others,  larger than the Earth’s moon (Callisto and Io). As a result, even more objects are deflected or absorbed, causing them to miss colliding with the Earth.Additionally, if the “Jupiter as shield” theory is valid, the entire massive set of bodies in the outer solar system plays a significant role in protecting the Earth. This supports Webb and Crane’s observation that Jupiter’s “origin and early history are of huge significance not just for understanding it, but also for the wider history of the solar system.” [8] The moon’s surface area is only seven percent of the Earth’s surface area, and its effect is not as large as Jupiter’s, but because it is much closer to the Earth, its effect is not, by any means, insignificant.[9]In short, if the shield theory is valid, the Earth is protected from meteorites, asteroids and comets by all of the five planets on the Earth’s far side (Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune), plus the over 100  moons circling these planets, as well as the two planets on the side of the Earth facing the Sun (Mercury and Venus).  The charting of the orbits of the planets for decades, indicates that the Earth is in a protected zone, reducing enormously the number of potential extraterrestrial collisions.Sun and planet sizes to scale. Jupiter outweighs all the other planets combined. Credit: Lunar and Planetary Institute.Crane and Webb Had to Mention the Church’s “Persecution” of GalileoWhen discussing astronomy, it seems mandatory to mention the persecution of Galileo. The New Scientist article is no exception. They write when Galileo “discovered four moons circling Jupiter… they were the first bodies conclusively shown to be orbiting a planet other than Earth. That … helped get Galileo into a lot of trouble with the religious authorities of his day.[10]Read our biography of Galileo for more facts about the “Galileo affair.”The “Galileo affair,” allegedly perpetrated by the Catholic Church, may not only be the most quoted example of “persecution” of science by religion, but one of the most misunderstood events in history. University of New Mexico History of science professor Timothy Moy correctly observed thatUnfortunately, Galileo’s trouble with the Church later became a popular archetype for the historical relationship between science and religion. Nothing could be further from the truth. For most of the medieval and Renaissance periods, and even stretching into the eighteenth century Enlightenment, the primary supporter of research and teaching in the sciences was the Roman Catholic Church…. the Church, in the aftermath of the Galileo affair, continued to promote research into evidence for heliocentrism, even to the point of turning entire cathedrals into giant pin-hole cameras to measure the apparent diameter of the solar disk at various times of the year.[11]Galileo’s main problem, what Professor Santilana called his “fatal mistake,” was his “rash indiscretion, his insistence on throwing open to the common people, by writing in the vernacular, a question which was far from being settled.”[12] This year another book was published on this topic, this time by Fulbright scholar Dr. Michael Keas (PhD in the history of science from the University of Oklahoma). In chapter 5 of Unbelievable: 7 Myths About the History and Future of Science and Religion, Keas quotes claims of persecution by leading atheists, showing their claims irresponsibly repeat common beliefs that do not comport with history.[13]Yet, in spite of numerous scholarly studies completed by leading scholars and science historians, the myth of Galileo persists, as is illustrated by the misleading claim in New Scientist quoted above.[14] To many, watching the transit of the four Galilean moons of Jupiter across Jupiter’s surface with a telescope is a very lovely sight to scientists and religious people alike. Such evidence first witnessed by Galileo does not threaten their faith. The transit of Venus, a much rarer event, is both delightful and scientifically informative.[15]The Solar System Designed for Life on EarthThe existing design of the solar system, with rocky planets near the sun and gas giants far away, is ideal for life to thrive on Earth. As far as is known, it is unique anywhere else in the universe. Thus, the Earth appears to occupy a privileged place in the solar system and, as far as known, in the universe as well.[16] The question is, how did it get that way? In attempting to account for the origin of Jupiter and the other planets, Crane and Webb, excluding intelligent design, decided the “only way we can explain the size and disruption of the planets as they now are is if they formed somewhere else and migrated to their current positions. To move whole worlds around you need something to give them a gravitational shove.”[17] This something, they conclude, could only have been the other planets.The Ghost of Velikovsky ReturnsAlthough Crane and Webb do not mention him for good reasons, they presented an idea eerily similar to one of the most derided theories in astronomy— that proposed by Immanuel Velikovsky.[18] Velikovsky’s most well-known book Worlds in Collision was first published in 1950. The book postulates that around the 15th century B.C., the modern planet Venus was ejected from Jupiter and passed near the Earth, ending up where it is today. On its trip to where it is today, Venus altered Earth’s orbit and axis, causing innumerable catastrophes. The details of Crane and Webb’s theory are very different than Velikovsky’s account, of course, but the basic idea is similar. It invokes “Jupiter’s gravitational bulldozing” planets into different positions from where they formed. They call this idea astronomers’ “best guess” for how the planets moved around, producing the solar system existing today.Velikovsky’s idea of the solar system’s formation was treated so poorly in the 1950s and 1960s that the leading American science organization, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, agreed to hold a session on Worlds in Collision, in which Velikovsky was able to take part.[19] Nonetheless, most all of the papers presented at the session were very negative towards his catastrophic views. Velikovsky’s work is frequently cited as a canonical example of pseudoscience.[20] Yet, a team of leading cosmologists at a conference in Nice, France proposed a catastrophic theory of planet formation that is now widely accepted, including drastic rearrangements of planets that led to our present solar system. It reminds one of Velikovsky’s basic theory![21] What goes around comes around.ConclusionsThe Galileo mission (1989-2003) orbited Jupiter and sent a probe into the atmosphere, but raised even more questions.The main findings of the space probes Pioneer 11 and Voyagers 1 and 2, which gave scientists their first looks at the outer solar system, is that the more we learn about the universe, the more we realize “we are learning a lot about Jupiter … but it’s raising even more questions … [and showing there are] real mysteries still to be revealed….” This is a common reaction in most areas of science, especially astronomy where most of what scientists do is observe and discover, not run repeatable lab experiments like biochemists can. It is becoming clearer as research progresses that the intelligent design explanation, accepted for most of Western history, fits the facts better than the problematic materialistic explanations, which depend on luck.References[1] Leah Crane and Richard Webb. 2019. “Hey, Big Splendour!” New Scientist. 242(3231):34-38, May 25-31. The online version was titled “By Jupiter! How the solar system’s giant made Earth ripe for life.” [2] Ward, Peter and Donald Browenlee. 2000. Rare Earth: Why Complex Life is Uncommon in the Universe. New York, NY: Copernicus Books.[3] Grazier, Kevin R. 2016. Jupiter: Cosmic Jekyll and Hyde. Astrobiology  16(1):1-20. January.[4] Grazier, 2016. Abstract. https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/ast.2015.1321.[5] Crane and Webb, 2019, p. 37.[6] DeYoung, Don and John Whitcomb. 2003. Our Created Moon: Earth’s Fascinating Neighbor. Green Forest, AR: Master Books, p. 82.[7] Crane and Webb, 2019, p. 35.[8] Crane and Webb, 2019, p. 36.[9] Gonzalez, Guillermo and Jay Richards. 2004. The Privileged Planet. Washington, DC: Regnery Publishing, p. 115.[10]  Crane and Webb, 2019, p. 35.[11]  Moy, Timothy. 2001. “Science, Religion, and the Galileo Affair” Skeptical Inquirer. 25(5):43-49, p. 45.[12] Santillana, Giorgie de. 1955. The Crime of Galileo. Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press,  p. 18.[13] Keas, Michael. 2019. Unbelievable: 7 Myths About the History and Future of Science and Religion. Wilmington, DE: Intercollegiate Studies Institute. Chapter 5 Gagging Galileo.[14] Ronald Numbers (Editor). 2009. Galileo Goes to Jail and Other Myths About Science and Religion. Cambridge,   MA: Harvard University Press. Myth 8, pp. 68-78.[15] Lomb, Nick. 2011. Transit of Venus. 1631 to the Present. New York, NY: The Experiment, pp. 46-47.[16]  Gonzalez and Richards, 2004.[17] Crane and Webb, 2019, p. 36.[18] Bergman, Jerry. 2014. “Immanuel Velikovsky and the Worlds in Collision.” Investigator. No. 154, pp. 41-45, 25. January.[19] Sagan, Carl. 1977. “An Analysis of Worlds in Collision” in Scientists Confront Velikovsky, Ed. by Donald Goldsmith. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.[20] Gordin, Michael. 2012. The Pseudoscience Wars: Immanuel Velikovsky and the Birth of the Modern Fringe. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.[21] Crane and Webb, 2019, p. 37.last_img read more

Delta joins American in deferring A350s

first_imgDelta Air Lines has joined competitor American Airlines in deferring deliveries of widebody Airbus A350 jets but it still expects to be flying the fuel-efficient aircraft later this year.Delta announced it would defer 10 of its 25 A350-900 deliveries set for 2019-20 by two to three years with an option of “additional flexible delivery’’.The deferral is part of a deal which saw it place an expanded order for 30 additional conventional engine option Airbus A321-200 single-aisle aircraft.The Atlanta, Georgia-based airline announced its schedule for its first A350-900 aircraft remained in place and it expected to take five of the aircraft in 2107. It planned to operate the first A350 revenue flight in the fourth quarter, featuring its Delta One suite and Premium Select cabin.  “These agreements better align our widebody and narrowbody order books with our fleet replacement needs,” said Delta chief operating officer Gil West.Delta currently operates 19 A321s and the additional planes will see it take 112 of the aircraft by 2021, primarily to replace older aircraft on US domestic routes.Its decision to defer the 10 A350s comes after American decided to delay delivery of its first A350-900 from spring this year to late 2018.American said deliveries would continue through to 2022, two years later than originally scheduled, with two A350s due in 2018 and five each in 2019 and 2020.The deferral would reduce capital expenditures in 2017 and 2018 and provide “capacity flexibility”, it said.Airbus chief operating officer John Leahy said the order for the additional A321ceos, powered by CFM56 engines and equipped with fuel-saving wing tip devices called sharklets, was a vote of confidence in the aircraft and demonstrated the aircraft’s operator, investor and passenger appeal.The manufacturer will deliver many of Delta’s A321s from its Us manufacturing facility in Mobile, Alabama.Airbus says the Mobile plant is expected to produce four aircraft per month by the end of this year with most going to US customers.last_img read more

South African firefighters well-received in Canada

first_img11 August 2015South African firefighting crews have received high praise from the Canadian Interagency Forest Fire Centre (CIFFC) for their excellent work ethic.The South Africans, from Working on Fire, are in the north American country as part of international wildland firefighting teams where they are fighting multiple fires in Alberta. Hundreds of fires have swept across the western part of the country this season.They have been in Canada since 21 July, and according to spokesman Linton Rensburg, they are expected to be there until 21 August.The 48 members of the crew are participants in the South African Working on Fire programme and are in Canada as part of a resource-sharing arrangement between its firefighting agencies and South Africa.They were initially deployed to Edmonton, where they helped with the suppression of wildland fires in the forests. Most of these fires have largely been contained, and the crews are busy with mopping up operations. One crew has started a second stint in Alberta, while the second has been deployed to assist in British Columbia.Following their first two weeks in Canada, CIFFC released a positive Crew Performance Report lauding the South Africans for their physical fitness, productivity, health and safety, and mopping up operations.High standards“When we arrived here in Canada we knew already that the South African training standards and qualifications were verified against the Canadian, USA, Mexico, Australian and New Zealand systems and our training was way up there, being compatible with international standards,” said Trevor Wilson, the liaison officer of the South African crews.According to Working on Fire managing director Llewellyn Pillay, the organisation has a long history of training young men and women to implement a range of integrated fire management products and services.“Over the years we have trained thousands to implement products and services such as fire prevention, fire awareness, fire detection and fire suppression within the land owner community in Africa, Chile and Australia,” he said.“Our upbeat and always happy South African crews with their song and dance have been well received in Canada and they have set positive examples to the local and international crews on how to build strong morale and teamwork.“These local and international crews have begun to mimic this and are, like the South Africans, now also attending team meetings instead of being scattered resources as in the past.”This was the first time that such an exercise had been undertaken in Canada and it would pave the way for future co-operation between the two countries, he added.Source: Working on Firelast_img read more

Former judge to probe BHU violence

first_imgThe Banaras Hindu University on Tuesday formed a high-power inquiry committee headed by a retired judge to probe the incident of lathicharge on protesting students and arson in the campus, which left several students, journalists and policemen injured.Meanwhile, Varanasi Divisional Commissioner Nitin Gokarn in his probe report submitted to the government is said to have blamed the BHU administration for not handling the incident, particularly the complaint of the molestation victim, in a sensitive manner and indicted the varsity for not taking timely action. The report submitted to Chief Secretary Rajiv Kumar, however, has not been made public.Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath had ordered the Divisional Commissioner and Varanasi ADG Vishwajit Mahapatra to probe the incident that took place on Saturday night.Promises actionBHU Vice-Chancellor Girish Chandra Tripathi said an inquiry committee headed by retired Allahabad High Court judge Justice V.K. Dikshit had been formed to probe the incident. Mr. Tripathi said the committee would shed light on ‘all aspects’ of the incident. “Whatever the recommendations of the committee, the University will take action on it,” he said.He said he would comment on the commissioner’s report after reading it.Amid speculation that the government had ordered a judicial probe, Uttar Pradesh Cabinet Minister Shrikant Sharma said only two existing probes stood in the BHU case — one by the ADG-Divisional Commissioner and the other by the District Magistrate of Varanasi. Mr. Sharma, however, told The Hindu that the CM had taken a serious view of the BHU incident and “to prevent such incidents in future, he appealed to the vice-chancellors of universities in U.P. to establish communication with students and identify those involved in cases of eve-teasing and take action against them.”A fine arts student of the BHU was molested by bike riders while she was returning to her hostel on Thursday evening. The victim alleged that instead of helping her the security guards on campus blamed her for not walking carefully in the dark while the warden questioned her character.Angered by this, scores of students, girls and boys, gathered at the main gate of the BHU for a protest which turned violent on Saturday after police lathi-charged the protesters, who the administration claimed included ‘anti-social elements.’last_img read more

LinkedIn Releases Offical Share Button

first_imgToday, LinkedIn, the social network targeted towards business professionals, released its offical share button . The button allows LinkedIn users to easily share content they find interesting and relevant with their network. Publishers can find instructions for how to add the share button on the Marketing Takeaway With all easily implemented options for sharing content such as Facebook, Twitter, Digg, Delicious, etc. it probably isn’t going to be the ease of execution that determines how successful LinkedIn’s share button is.  At 85 million users and a new users joining every second the success of LinkedIn’s share button is going to fall in the hands of it’s users.   Once you have taken the time to create remarkable content make sure that you are doing everything you can to share it with your entire network.  Since your LinkedIn network may find your content relevant this is an excellent way allow them to help you spread your content beyond your immediate reach.  Head on over to LinkedIn to try out your share button today. Originally published Nov 30, 2010 3:00:00 PM, updated October 20 2016center_img Social Media Engagement Since those connected on LinkedIn most likely share business interests, it is very likely that the LinkedIn share button becomes a standard for business related content.   Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack portion of the LinkedIn site.  LinkedIn is offering three options to choose from: a vertical button with a share counter, a horizontal button with a share counter, and a horizontal button without a counter.  To add a button to your website or blog all you need to do is choose a button style and copy and paste a few lines of code.  publishers Topics:last_img read more

Using Social Sharing Buttons Leads to 7x More Mentions [Data]

first_img Social Media Engagement Originally published Sep 13, 2011 1:01:00 PM, updated February 01 2017 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Social media can be a great promotional vehicle for sharing your content and helping it reach an extended audience beyond your direct network of fans, followers, and subscribers. But are you missing out on some low-hanging fruit to make sure you give your content what’s necessary to help it spread?When it comes to spreading content in social media, some of the easiest-to-pick pieces of low-hanging fruit are social sharing buttons. Adding social sharing buttons for sites like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Google+ to your website, blog articles, and landing pages is a simple way to encourage visitors to spread your content and reach even more potential customers.So if it’s so easy, everyone must be doing it, right? Wrong.According to a recent study conducted by SEO platform BrightEdge Technologies, the homepages of almost half of the top 10,000 websites studied (46.4%) had no social links or plugins installed.But what’s even more interesting is the impact of the social sharing buttons that were used on the other 53.6% of websites. Looking at the effect of social plugins on a website’s traffic and how much content is shared, BrightEdge also conducted analysis on over 4 million tweets. When studying how often a website using a Twitter sharing button was mentioned on Twitter, on average, a website with no Twitter share button was mentioned just four times. However, websites that did include a Twitter sharing button were mentioned 27 times, on average. Therefore, including a Twitter share button increased Twitter mentions sevenfold.Marketing TakeawayDon’t miss out on easy opportunities to help your content and messages spread. Adding sharing buttons to your website is simple, yet half of the top websites don’t do it.BrightEdge Technologies’ study focused on social sharing buttons on websites’ homepages. While a website’s homepage isn’t the only place marketers should be adding social sharing links, the study’s findings indicate just how powerful they can be. When incorporating social sharing buttons into your website, be sure to add them to any page you have content — landing pages, blog articles, product pages, etc. It’s an easy, sure-fire way to extend your reach.Have you added social sharing buttons to your content yet?Photo Credit: joyosity Topics:last_img read more

5 Deadly Twitter Sins to Avoid

first_imgThis is a guest blog post written by our friends Nikki and Tammy at MarketMeSuite, the free social media marketing dashboard.Twitter can be a great platform for many inbound marketers to connect with potential customers, maintain relationships with current customers, and generate new leads. But that’s not to say that all marketers are using it appropriately.To make sure you’re using it the right way, avoid these five deadly sins when utilizing Twitter as part of your inbound marketing program.1. Thou Shalt Not SPAMSpamming your followers with endless links to your own website is a sure path to a lack of interest and support and a distinct lack of appreciation. Do not rely upon automated direct messages. Yes, these types of messages are allowed by Twitter. But many — if not most — users find auto DMs both spammy and impersonal. More importantly, they are a dying feature. All sense of meaning and genuine feeling goes out the proverbial window when you send these robotic and generic thank you’s. Try to connect with as many of your followers as you can…personally. The bonus? An alternative message might be less of a hard sell, and as a result, more helpful. Consider saying, “Thanks for following! I can also be reached on @MarketMeHelp if you have any questions.”Don’t spam using hashtags. This is a big, nay HUGE, no-no. Some businesses see a trending hashtag on their Twitter feed and then add that hashtag to their own tweets in the often misguided hope that those following the trending hashtag will think will see their irrelevant tweet and think they are awesome. You are not awesome for using that hashtag in your tweet. Avoid doing this at all costs. Your rep will suffer, and it will appear painfully obvious to all that you are promoting where you should not. Reserve hashtag use only for instances when the hashtag is relevant to you and your tweets.2. Thou Shall Not DriftKeep your Twitter profile and bio up-to-date. Always. Complacency kills marketability. Any individual stumbling across an out-of-date page is not going to take you seriously, and it won’t do anything for your online business reputation, except deflate it. Not tweeting is also part of this sin. No one will be interested in following you if your last tweet was 17 days ago.Don’t be lazy about interacting with others. If someone takes the time to tweet to you, tweet back to them. It’s polite, and it builds up customer and prospect relationships. Too many businesses ignore tweets. Remember that @replies aren’t the only tweets you should look out for and reply to. There are several free, third-party Twitter apps that allow you to create search panes to monitor mentions of your business, brand, and industry topics to allow you to monitor conversations and participate when appropriate.3. Thou Shalt Not Blatantly Self-PromoteAlthough Twitter gives you the opportunity to spread your message, don’t use it purely for the purpose of promoting your business, products, and services. You need to keep your social profiles sounding organic and sounding real. Remember that social media implies that there is a human behind each tweet — a real person you can interact and engage with. Constantly pitching your followers with “Try our product. It’s the best!”-type messages will only annoy them. Instead, tweet relevant content to get that inbound marketing engine primed for success. If you’re desperate to get your product out there to this audience, consider retweeting others’ reviews. Because they are not written by you, this level of outside influence creates an interest and associated trust in your brand.4. Thou Shalt Not Use Only 140 CharactersTwitter’s message convention is inherently restrictive, and sometimes you need to compromise your communication to fit into the 140-character limitation. Consider spreading your longer messages over two or three tweets, instead of a single one. This is not the time to try haiku marketing if your tweet has value.5. Thou Shalt Not BashPeople tweet, post, comment, or blog about nasty things. This lack of civility happens to individuals and companies each and every day. The very worst thing you can do is react via Twitter in a defensive manner. It can do more damage to your reputation than ignoring the troll. Instead, consider sending a level-headed tweet that says something along the lines of “So sorry you feel that way. Is there anything I/we can do to change your mind?” or DM them with your email address where the conversation can take place privately. Tweeting uncomplimentary messages about your competition is also considered poor sportsmanship in the digital world. Unadulterated bashing of a competitor will actually create a loss in respect for you and your organization. No one likes overt arrogance and a self-righteous attitude. Keep your negative opinions to yourself, and act in a mature and reasonable manner. Marketing TakeawaySocial media can be a gold mine for lead generation, but it will be little more than a dud if abused. Be personal with your tweets, always interact, and never leave a customer without a response. Think to yourself: “How would I handle this if I were talking to the person face to face?” because your social media engagement needs to be just as real.What other deadly since should marketers avoid on Twitter?Image credit: Spec-ta-cles Twitter Marketing Topics: Originally published Oct 25, 2011 8:36:00 AM, updated October 20 2016 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

5 Simple Secrets to B2B Lead Generation on Facebook [SlideShare]

first_imgI once went to a marketing conference. I don’t remember the name of it.What I do remember is that some smart person presented about the difference between B2B and B2C marketing. Smart Guy said, “B2B is still P2P” (meaning person-to-person, not peer-to-peer illegal downloading ;).The thing is, I don’t remember his name either, so I can’t give him credit. Now, I like to strut around the office poofy-chested and pretend I came up with it … though at the time, I was placing palm to forehead and wondering why I wasn’t the cool person who strung those four words together. It’s so simple. Yet a lot of us B2B marketers still get hung up on what to say and how to act in social media. It’s as if selling to people who work at companies somehow regresses our interpersonal skills. It shouldn’t. There really isn’t that much of a difference, and we can rejoice knowing that we can continue going about business both online and off just as if we were speaking to one another — in person — over a BBQ frisbee and some iced tea at California Pizza Kitchen. And we’ve seen first hand how successful you can be on social media if you think of B2B like P2P. The HubSpot Facebook Page has amassed over 570,000 fans and generated 190,000 leads, and we’ve done that by focusing on people. We’ve also learned a few things along the way about what types of content to create and share on Facebook to generate those fans and leads. But you know how this whole inbound marketing thing works — you share your secrets with your audience. So that’s what we’re gonna do today. Take a cruise through the SlideShare presentation and blog post below to see what secrets we’ve uncovered. And, if you want to get your own copy plus a printable tip sheet, click here. Facebook Marketing Topics: Originally published Sep 30, 2013 8:00:00 AM, updated July 28 2017center_img 5 Simple Secrets to B2B Lead Generation on Facebook from HubSpot All-in-one Marketing Software1) You Don’t Need a Facebook Strategy. You Need a Content Strategy.At HubSpot, we create content like blog posts, presentations, templates, and ebooks that aim to make the jobs of marketers easier. All this content creation arms our social media manager with a library of resources to promote in unique ways on Facebook. Without all this helpful content, we’d simply have nothing interesting to post or advertise on Facebook, and we sure as heck wouldn’t generate any leads! You can’t play Scrabble without any letters, now can you?2) To Generate Leads, You Can’t Only Post Lead Gen Content.It just doesn’t work. The key to generating leads on Facebook is to post a variety of content that will sometimes address goals other than generating leads or driving sales. Aiming for “fluffier” goals like reach, awareness, buzz, customer satisfaction, and engagement (comments, likes, shares) are just as important as rigid lead gen or sales goals. They’re the stepping-stones to what you really want: more business. That’s why a balance is so important. No eyeballs –> no clicks –> no leads for you. 3) Have a Non-Lead Gen Goal for Every Post.Although our ultimate goal on Facebook is to generate leads all the leads all the time, we have immediate engagement goals for each post we publish, and those goals can vary. You can’t always address them all with one post. Sometimes we really want to encourage comments because we want feedback. Other times, we may strive to for a high volume of shares because we want a particular message to spread as far and wide as possible. We first focus on those eyeballs –> then we get those clicks –> then we get those leads. 4) Whatever You Do, Don’t Skimp on the Visuals.We may not always be sure what we’re posting will incite the interaction we desire, but one thing can be sure of is we’re better off posting a photo as opposed to a link, video, or plain ol’ status update.In a recent 30-day experiment, we found that the click-through rate of posts containing photos is 128% higher than the CTR of posts containing videos or links. We also know photos on Facebook generate 53% more Likes than the average post. That’s why, no matter what we’re trying to communicate, we try to do it visually. If our social media manager doesn’t have a pre-made image to work with, doggonit she’ll spend the time creating one or she’s banned from the beer fridge!5) Oh Yeah … You Probably Gotta Advertise.The people who “Like” our company already know about us, but that doesn’t mean they even know what we sell, or that they’re ideal future customers. Even though we’re approaching 600,000 fans, only a fraction of those people actually have the need and authority to buy our all-in-one software.That’s why we also pay to reach marketers who fit our target and are not yet connected to our page using various types of Facebook ads. But even though we advertise, we’re not advertising our software. We’re advertising all that helpful content we created. Jay Baer calls this pro tip “marketing your marketing.” You’re gonna wanna do that.These are just a few tips we have to create engaging Facebook content for B2B brands. Want to get more resources so you can do it yourself? Click here to download our presentation above and a printable tip sheet to help you produce engaging content every time you post. Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

Facebook Rolls Out Twitter-Like ‘Trending’ Topics Feature

first_img Originally published Jan 17, 2014 11:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Topics: Facebook Marketing Facebook released one more feature today — one that’s remarkably Twitter-like, actually.According to Mashable, the new tool is called “Trending,” and it’ll be showing up in a Facebook account near you in the next few weeks — on both mobile and desktop. The feed will show a list of popular topics, personalized to the user.Sound familiar? Take a look below for a sample of what it’ll look like:You’ll notice that, in addition to the topic, there’s a nice little description of the topic below, too.It’s also important to note that Trending isn’t necessarily pulling in just one particular article for each trending topic. If you click into a trending topic, you’ll see a list of several posts related to the topic.How Facebook Trending WorksYou may be wondering, “Hey, how do I get my content trending? That seems like some pretty good real estate.”Good question. Well, Facebook’s placing content up there based on a couple criteria:Which content is getting the most attention across the entire Facebook platform — this is being measured based on whether the topic has seen a “sharp increase in popularity,” rather than the net volume of content about the topic.Which content is more relevant for that particular user based on his or her interestsAnd now that you know that, you might be thinking, “Great, this means I have to buy a bunch of Facebook ads to get my content spiking in mentions.”Actually, that’s not true … at least not yet. Facebook’s not including sponsored or promoted content in their Trending topics right now. But who knows what the future has in store, so try to get in your Trending face time now.So … whaddya think of this new feature from Facebook?last_img read more