5 Tips to Write a Really Quick Blog Article

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack If you blog you have probably gotten to the point where you needed an article last minute to keep up the pace of your content publishing.  Here are 5 tips that might help you put together an article really quickly (like I did with this one).Write an article that is a list of 5 ideas.  People love lists and tips, especially in blogs.  They are easy to scan and easy to digest.  Perfect for web surfing or scanning your RSS reader.  This article is an example.Publish a list of links.  Linking is the currency of the blogosphere, and if you link to other bloggers, they will notice (good ones should anyway, except for the really big/famous ones who get tons of traffic) and you might get a link or comment back.  Here is an example of a list of links article.Take a recent experience and share it.  Has something interesting happened to you?  Was it at all related to your blog subject?  Write a blog article about a recent experience, like this blog article I wrote about a spam email sent to me.Answer questions you have received recently.  We all get questions by phone or email from clients and prospects in our area of expertise.  Collect a few of them and then publish a blog article answering them.  Here is an example of a blog article that answers some questions.  A great tip is to start with the actual email question you received and the email answer you sent, and then just edit it so it is more general and not client specific.Comment on other blog articles.  Need ideas?  Read other blogs in your industry, and then provide your own point of view on the issue at hand.  Here is an example of a blog article that is responding to another blog article.Have other tips on how to get a blog article out quickly?  Share them by leaving a comment below. Originally published Dec 19, 2007 12:12:00 PM, updated October 01 2019last_img read more

7 Places You Need to Publish Content on Your Website (Beyond Your Blog)

first_img Originally published Mar 16, 2012 9:00:00 AM, updated October 20 2016 Content Creation Topics: Inbound marketers know content creation is key to their success, so it makes sense that business blogs are one of their most precious marketing assets. Blogging is a natural way to get more indexed pages on your website, create content around keywords you want to rank for in search, and convert site visitors into customers.But once companies master blogging, isn’t there another way to expand content creation efforts on your website? Aren’t there other parts of your website to which you can publish the valuable content you’ve become so great at creating — and maybe drive even more traffic, leads, and customers for your business?In short, yes, there are plenty of other ways to house content on your website (and if you’re a HubSpot customer, making an addition to your navigation is simple)! While you may not update these parts of your website as frequently as a blog (we update our blog multiple times daily, for example) adding these content repositories to your website — or updating the ones that already exist — will help you drive even more traffic, and convert those visitors into leads and customers.Don’t let content creation begin and end with blogging. Consider building out or updating these areas of your website with fresh content to create a truly comprehensive content library that you and your site visitors can benefit from.News RoomYou’re likely familiar with the ‘News Room’ concept for websites — many companies have them, including yours truly. The news section of a website is often found under the ‘About Us’ portion of the main navigation, and contains content like press releases about company and product updates, event information, mentions of your company in the news, and awards received. That’s a lot of content!Perhaps that’s why it’s so common to stumble across the ‘News’ section of a website and find nothing has been updated in years. This can be due to lack of new content to publish — perhaps your company hasn’t received much news coverage — or just plain negligence. While we can’t help you with negligence, there are ways to make sure the content on the ‘News’ section of your website always remains fresh.First, don’t break out all of the components of a website news section into multiple sub-navigations if you don’t have the content to fill it. Combine your press releases, event information, company and product updates, awards received, and company news in a rolling feed. In fact, you can think of it kind of like a second blog! And to ensure there truly is content for that second blog, don’t just wait for others to write about you. It’s okay — in this context — to write about yourself. If you’re working on a new product release, write a few paragraphs about how features are progressing. If a partner of yours gets news coverage, share that in this section; your partners’ successes are your successes, too. Aim for just one update a month so this section of your site never looks dormant to visitors and leads researching more about your company.(Tip: Some companies are found in the news so often that they face the opposite problem — there’s so much content, their news section looks completely disorganized! Categorize content by month to make it easier for visitors to sort through.)Resource CenterResource centers are ideal locations to house your long-form educational content like whitepapers, guides, and ebooks. Many marketers are reticent to launch a resource center though, because the bulk of their long form content is reserved for lead generation and driving reconversions through lead nurturing. You don’t want to make that content totally public, right?Fair point, but there is a best-of-both-worlds solution! First, if there is any content you’ve created that you’re willing to share with the world form-free, publish it. The rest of your content, however, can still be behind a form. Simply draft an abstract or select a poignant excerpt from the content to publish as a sort of preview. Then, direct the visitor to the landing page where the content can be redeemed. We do this with our long-form content in our own resource center to help drive more leads and reconversions. What a great supplement to your calls-to-action in lead nurturing emails and blog content!Your resource center can also house third-party content like market research and analyst reports. If you work with third party content creators or researchers, offer to publish their long-form content in your resource center. It gets them more visibility in front of a new audience, and it can help you keep the content in your resource center fresh.Product & Service Data CenterMany B2B companies have technical documentation centered around their product or service — content like data sheets, integration information, FAQs, and release notes. Sometimes businesses choose to wrap these into their resource center, but if you have extensive documentation to publish, it’s best to separate this from your resource center content. Why? Because the traffic to your resource center is in a different stage of the buying cycle than the traffic interested in looking at technical documentation surrounding your product or service.Publish content here for leads and business partners in the ‘evaluation’ and ‘purchase’ stages of the buying cycle — they are more interested in your solution than those visiting your resource center. And to make the most of this content, don’t forget to include ‘purchase’-oriented calls-to-action on these web pages, and within the content itself!Product DetailsIf you’re in ecommerce marketing, you have a unique opportunity to leverage the non-blog portion of your website to create new content. For every product for sale on most ecommerce sites, there’s a product description section underneath that’s all too often left blank or filled with generic (or worse, duplicate) content from the manufacturer. Take advantage of this space to write unique, keyword-optimized content that describes the product, compels readers to take action, and helps you rank for important search terms. HubSpot customer OneIHI does this exceptionally well, drafting content that’s informative, engaging, optimized, and comprehensive below each product.To keep the page content fresh, you can also enable user comments and reviews under the product details. And we all know how crucial reviews are to establishing a prospect’s trust in your business.Learning CenterIf you set up a learning center, you can create use cases — pieces of content that show how your product or service can be used to solve your customers’ problems. This content can be long-form or short-form written content, videos, or even just images with brief explanatory captions. HubSpot, for example, features customer examples of landing pages, calls-to-action, blogs, and the like that has been made using HubSpot’s software.Encourage customers to submit instances of using your product or service successfully (you can set up a landing page to collect their responses), and incentivize your customer service and support teams to collect such stories to keep the content on these pages fresh. If you opt for visual content like images or videos to demonstrate your use cases, be sure to accompany it with explanatory copy, even if it’s brief. Aside from being a helpful complement to the visual content, keyword-optimized copy can help you rank for solution-seeking search terms like “how to create a landing page” or “examples of good calls-to-action.”HubSpot also includes information about what product functionality is being utilized; if you have different feature levels, customers reading these use cases may be inspired by a feature they don’t have, and purchase additional services from you. Talk about revenue-generating content!As with the news section of your website, be sure to categorize your use cases in the manner that makes the most sense for your business — like location, industry, or product or service type — to make browsing simple for visitors.Multimedia Content LibraryAlthough written content is often the focus of marketers’ content creation efforts, consumers certainly love to consume other content formats. Do you have an arsenal of multimedia content, like podcasts, webcasts, and videos? Consider creating an item in your sub-navigation to feature this content. Multimedia content requires more time and dedication to consume than written content — visitors have to pull out headphones, switch on their volume, possibly duck from their boss — so give them one central location from which to watch and listen to this content. And just like the content in your resource center, your multimedia content can still live behind a lead generation form. Just be sure to write a brief description of the video, podcast, or webinar with the call-to-action!(Tip: If you don’t have enough multimedia content to warrant its own section of your site, you can group this in with the content in your resource center.)Reviews, Testimonials, & Case StudiesSetting up a dedicated section of your website for reviews, testimonials, and case study content is crucial for leads in the ‘evaluation’ stage in the buying cycle. HubSpot breaks the content up into shorter customer reviews (pictured below) and longer, more in-depth content in the form of customer case studies.Case study content typically requires more time and investment to create than customer reviews, so if you’re just getting started with this section of your website, consider the tabbed approach you see above. You can begin with one page with only short customer reviews, sourced from all over the web. Notice the HubSpot reviews come from guest blog posts on our own site, external blog posts, LinkedIn reviews, and even Yahoo! Answers. Keeping this content fresh will be much more manageable than churning out new case studies every month.Once you’ve accumulated 3-5 case studies for your business — whether they are video recordings or written content — create a separate tab or another point of sub-navigation to publish them. As with all other content repositories on your site, categorize the case studies in a way that makes sense for your site visitors and sales team. We’ve found categorizing case studies by industry helps leads and our sales team find the most appropriate content quickly.Where else on your site do you house non-blog content? Share your suggestions in the comments!Image credit: khalid Albaih Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

Facebook Rolling Out Video Ads to News Feeds, and Other Marketing Stories of the Week

first_img Topics: Social Media Video You’ve heard the saying over and over again, but it still holds true: Content is king. Whether you’re creating a blog post, infographic, tweet, or even a PPC ad, creating content that people naturally want to consume will help you attract visitors, capture leads, and convert customers. This week, this saying held especially true in the world of inbound marketing. From Facebook’s new video advertising offering to Q&As with industry experts on Klout, this week’s roundup will fill you in on all things content-related on the web. Oh, and Happy Mother’s Day! ;-)Facebook Rolling Out Video Ads to News Feeds, From AdWeekOver the past few months, Facebook has been making some major moves with its social advertising platform. And the social network’s latest move doesn’t surprise us in the least: Facebook will be rolling out video ads in users’ News Feeds as soon as July. A few big brands including Ford, Coca-Cola, and American Express, are expected to participate in the first round of testing. For the time being, advertisers will only be allowed to choose among four different demographics to target.The 15-second ads will most likely appear to the side of the News Feed, on auto play, and muted by default with the option of unmuting. We’re still not sure yet if this new feature is good or bad news for marketers. While the new ad format opens up more opportunities to attract visitors and generate leads from Facebook, it could potentially alienate Facebook users. Many users complain that their News Feeds are already a bit cluttered with sponsored posts and pages — this new advertising format could add to the fray. That being said, it’s still too early to give the new ad format a yay or nay. Depending on how Facebook plans to moderate the number of ads per News Feed, these video ads could either turn the platform into an ad-filled mess or an effective ad-serving platform. Read more about Facebook’s video advertising options at Adweek.Google Launches YouTube Trends Map to Show the Most Popular Videos Across the U.S. in Real Time, From The Next WebAs you probably know by now, we love data — and the new Trends Map for YouTube melts our heart. Although it’s still in its infancy, the new Trends Map shows the most popular videos across the U.S., broken down by viewer age or gender. The map gives marketers a nice visual representation of how viral videos are shared and received across the country in real time. The videos that make it onto the map are chosen based on the number of shares by users, or total number of views. In addition to the map, marketers can also examine the popularity of particular videos based on certain demographics.For marketers, YouTube Trends Map is a great place to find relevant data on which videos go viral and why. Right now, the Trends Map only displays demographic information, but once there is more robust data available, it could be an incredibly powerful tool for marketers. Still, YouTube Trends Map can help marketers find engaging content to share with their followers, discover viral videos to newsjack, or even create a viral video of their own. Read more about YouTube Trends Map and what it means for marketers at The Next Web.YouTube Paid Subscription Channels Set to Launch Soon, From Marketing LandIt’s been a busy week for YouTube. Not only did the company recently release YouTube Trends Map, but it also started rolling out paid subscription channels offering premium video content. Besides providing a potential new revenue stream for YouTube, these paid subscription channels could attract a different type of audience who is concerned with the quality of the videos he or she watches rather than the quantity of videos available. The premium subscription is planned to compete with other premium video services such as Amazon, Hulu, and Netflix. With as many as 50 subscription-based channels at the time of launch and fees as low as $1.99 a month, this could be a great alternative revenue stream for YouTube.What marketers should know is that this new move will open up a number of advertising opportunities for companies looking to place ads in higher quality content. Even though its user-generated videos have been an effective way of serving ads, some marketers are looking to pay for TV–like quality. The new premium subscription channels could open up a whole new demographic of users for marketers to target with higher quality ads on higher quality videos. Read more about YouTube’s paid subscription channels at Marketing Land.Traditional Turned Inbound: Reimagining 5 Iconic Ad Campaigns From the Past, Free Ebook From HubSpotSometimes, it boggles our minds how much things in marketing have changed in the last 60 years. Some of the most iconic advertising campaigns happened before we had social media, precise ad targeting, or even the internet. Thinking back got us thinking — what would an iconic advertising campaign from the “Mad Men” era look like today? Based on advice from current marketing experts, our new ebook explores how today’s marketers could execute those iconic ad campaigns to get the same impact they had in past. Get ready for a dive into the history of marketing and advertising, and download the ebook today!Klout Gets Into the Q&A Business by Launching Klout Experts (With Help From Bing), From TechCrunchThe popular influence-measurement startup is launching a new program built around industry “expert” Q&As that influencers can use to boost their street cred. Klout is asking users who are influential about certain topics to answer questions in 300 characters or less, allowing Klout to enter into the content creation space. Klout will also be working closely with Microsoft to ensure that relevant answers to questions will appear in searches on Bing.Marketers should see this as the perfect opportunity to boost their SEO on Bing. The program isn’t open to all users just yet, but if you’re one of those influential marketers on Klout that happens to be asked a few questions, answer them, and let Bing do the rest of the work. This might be a great way to establish yourself as an industry thought leader and promote your social media presence through quality content. You may even increase the ranking of your other content online. Read more about Klout and what it means for inbound marketers at TechCrunch.What were some of the top marketing stories you heard about this week? Originally published May 12, 2013 9:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

Education Blogging 101: How to Attract More Students Online

first_imgActive blogging is a basic building block of any successful inbound marketing strategy – its hub, if you will. For schools and admissions offices struggling for resources, launching and maintaining a blog may seem like a daunting undertaking. But it’s one well worth taking. HubSpot research found that marketers who prioritize blogging are 13x more likely to be able to show a return for their efforts.Having a school blog (or two) can boost your student applications in a number of ways. First, good blogs are regularly updated with with entertaining, informative content. Google loves blogs with a steady flow of engaging content. If you’re writing around the right keywords, your blog will increase the flow of organic traffic to your blog and website. Also, the more you blog, the more inbound links you get back to your site, which Google also loves. It sees inbound links as a sign of trust and authority for your content, so it bumps up your place in search results because it wants to serve up the most relevant, reliable content. Helpful, engaging blog content also gets shared on social media, which in turns drives more new visitors to your site. Once you have all these new visitors to your blog and website, you have the opportunity to get their information into your marketing database. You want to include a call-to-action form on every blog post, and throughout your website. The call-to-action may be to sign up for your newsletter or blog, or to download a report. The blog visitor shares her email and other information with you in order to get this content.Now you can push more content out to them overtime as you nurture them along the path to making an application. And the more they visit your blog, the more effectively you can personalize the content you send them.As you can see, having a school blog gives you more opportunities and control over how and when to interact with prospective students and parents who’ve already shown interest in your school. It also provides a bigger platform to tell the school’s stories, instead of relying entirely on others to frame your stories for you.Convinced you yet why your school needs a blog? Great. Here are the basics to put together when you plan it out.Choosing the Right ContentEvery successful blog shares content that its personas want to read about. The blog posts educate readers about the issues that concern or interest them. The posts don’t directly promote your school. Leave that for other types of content.When you built your personas, you outlined each one’s goals, challenges, and concerns. Use that information to keep your blog content focused on topics they’ll read, share, and react to. If your personas need some sprucing, go back and ask with some current and prospective students what information would be most valuable to them. Ask the parents as well.Refine your topic list by looking at all the content your school already creates. Your school already has tons of content. There are curricula, admissions FAQs, program brochures, career office reports, and campus organization descriptions. What questions are these pieces answering? How can a blog post dig deeper or provide a new perspective on them?Finding Content Sources to Feed Your BlogAs you’re making your list of all your school’s existing content you want to use to spark blog post ideas, it probably occurred to you that you can use some of this existing content itself.Great idea. Your existing content can be converted, with just a little tweaking, directly into blog posts.In addition to the content sources listed in the previous section, also look at any newsletter or publication put out by a student group, program, even your alumni and development newsletters. Are any faculty or staff writing thought leadership pieces – see if you can reprint them on your school’s blog. If you can’t reprint them, you can craft your own post sharing the piece and linking to it.When you convert existing content into a blog post, make sure to edit it so it works in a blog setting. Give it some context as a blog post. You’re not going to just reprint a program’s curriculum. You’ll rework that content into a post about the different areas of theoretical and practical knowledge the program provides, and why each is important – with a call-to-action linking to the full curriculum.Creating a Stable of WritersRepurposing existing content is a great tactic for finding meaningful, cost effective content for your blog. But you do want original work on the blog as well, in addition to people on your marketing team who can write.Many of your student leaders would love having a platform on your blog, from formal student ambassadors to group leaders. Student voices are especially influential with prospective students, who want to know what life is really like at your school.Have alumni who want to give back, but aren’t yet in a place where they can write a check? Ask them to write about their transition from student to the next phase of their life, whether its finding a job or getting another degree. Faculty and department staff also have stories to tell about what’s going on in their domains. Find a couple key people in each department who have an interesting voice to write posts occasionally.Have a Distribution Plan Blogs without a distribution plan are the falling trees nobody hears. Regular posting of high quality content based on relevant keywords will build some SEO juice for your site. But there’s more to distribution than organic traffic.Outline how you’ll use your social media profiles to promote your blog, and get others to share links to your blog via their own social profiles. Include links to blog posts in your newsletters and emails in other campaigns, where they add value.Managing your blog will be much easier when you don’t have reinvent the distribution plan for each post. This doesn’t mean each post goes into each newsletter or gets its own promotional email. It means outline the different avenues for distribution and promotion and clarify which routes work for different types of blog posts. Then it’s easy to specify in your blog calendar how any given post will be promoted.Attracting Students to Your Blog is the First Step to Getting Their ApplicationEvery prospective student is on their own, personal enrollment journey. If you want your school to be part of that journey, a school blog is the best way to attract them early on in the process. Originally published May 5, 2016 7:00:00 AM, updated February 14 2018 Education Marketing Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

The Character Count Guide for Blog Posts, Videos, Tweets & More

first_img Originally published Apr 25, 2017 8:00:00 AM, updated October 16 2019 Featured Resource: 6 Free Blog Post TemplatesPost BodyWhen it comes to the length of blog posts, there are a few different items to consider. For example:According to Medium, posts with an average read time of seven minutes captured the most attention.The average reading speed of native English-speaking adults remains commonly cited as 300 words per minute, according to research conducted in 1990.At that reading rate, the ideal post length is 2100 words.That aligns with research previously conducted by Capsicum Mediaworks, which indicated that, on average, the top 10 results for most Google searches are between 2,000 and 2,500 words.Source: Capsicum MediaworksThat means that this ideal word count can address goals around both readability and SEO. But that’s just the actual body of the post. Plus, when we looked at our own blog on organic traffic, we found that the sweet spot was 2,250–2,500 words.But that’s just the post body — let’s have a look at the other areas of text that comprise a full blog post.TitleThe length of your title depends on your goals, and where it will appear.Let’s start with SEO. Do you want this post to rank really well in search? It turns out, that often has to do with the dimensions of each entry on a search engine results page (SERP). For Google, titles of search results are usually contained at a length of 600 pixels — which Moz measures as being able to display the first 50-60 characters of a title tag. So, if you don’t want your title to get cut off in the search results, it might be best to keep it under 60 characters. But when in doubt, you can double-check the length of your meta description and title tags with this handy tool from SEOmofo, or you can use Moz’s title tag preview tool.Then, there’s optimizing your title for social sharing. On Twitter, for example, consider that each tweet has a limit of 140 characters — however, if you include an image, that doesn’t count toward the limit. But consider that even the average shortened URL takes up about 23 characters — that leaves you with about 116 characters left for the title and any accompanying text.In our own analysis at HubSpot, we found that headlines between 8–12 words in length got the most Twitter shares on average, while headlines with either 12 or 14 words got the most Facebook Likes.Meta DescriptionA meta description refers to the HTML attribute that explains the contents of a given webpage. It’s the short description you see on a SERP to “preview” what the page is about.Moz notes that Google seems to cut off most meta descriptions — which are sometimes called snippets — after roughly two lines of text — though there’s some conjecture that, like title tags, it’s actually based on pixel count. In any case, it amounts to about 160 characters, though this particular outlet recommends keeping it at 155.Again, you can double-check the length of your meta description and title tags with this handy tool from SEOmofo.2) FacebookQuick reference:Status updates: 63,206-character maximum | Ideal length is 40 charactersVideo: 120-minute maximum | Ideal length is two minutes Ideal Length OverallLike so much of what we’ve covered, it seems that when it comes to the overall length of a tweet, aim for short and sweet. (See what we did there?) That’s resonated in research conducted by social media scientist Dan Zarrella, who found that tweets with 120-130 characters showed the highest click-through rate (CTR):Source: BufferThe same goes for hashtags. While they can technically be any length up to 140 characters, remember that people will want to accompany the hashtag with other copy. Short hashtags are always better. Ideally, your hashtags should be under 11 characters — shorter if you can.Also, in a single tweet, stick to one or two hashtags, and definitely don’t go over three. Buddy Media found that all tweets with hashtags get double the engagement metrics than tweets without any. But tweets that kept the hashtags to a minimum — one or two — have a 21% higher engagement than tweets with three or more.Source: BufferVideosYou can post a video on Twitter by importing a video or recording it using the Twitter app. In any case, the maximum video length is two minutes and 20 seconds.4) LinkedInProfilesHere’s a handy list of some of LinkedIn’s most important profile character maximums, according to Andy Foote:Professional headline: 120Summary: 2,000Position title: 100Position description: 2,000 (200 character minimum)Status Update: 600 characters — however, Foote also notes that, “if you select to also post on Twitter from LinkedIn, only the first 140 characters will show on your Twitter post.” Featured Resource: How to Engage Your Facebook Audience Status UpdatesFacebook’s character limit on status updates is 63,206. However, that’s far from ideal, says HubSpot Social Media Marketing Manager Chelsea Hunersen. “The social gurus will throw around the number 40 characters. That data seems to be backed up by BuzzSumo’s ranking of HubSpot’s own Facebook Page.”But why 40, specifically? “Ideally,” Hunersen says, “you’ll want to use the copy in a status update to provide context for whatever you’re linking to.” That said, she notes, the copy of the status update itself isn’t as important as the copy in the meta title or meta description that gets pulled in when you insert a link into your post. That’s right — social media posts have their own meta data too.”Often, people look at the image of the article and then directly down at the meta title and meta description for context clues,” she explains. “A lot of people don’t realize you can change those.”Even on Facebook, it’s still best to keep your meta title to fewer than 60 characters, and to 155 for meta descriptions. There are some resources available to those familiar with coding that let you play around with social media metadata character counts, like these templates. But unless you’re a developer, we recommend keeping it short and sweet.VideoWhile Facebook allows a maximum of 120 minutes for videos, we wouldn’t advise posting anything that long, unless you’re doing a special, social-media-only screening of a full-length film.According to research conducted by Wistia, two minutes is the “sweet spot” — even a minute longer than that shows a significant drop in viewership. “Engagement is steady up to [two] minutes, meaning that a 90-second video will hold a viewer’s attention as much as a 30-second video, the research reads,” so “if you’re making short videos, you don’t need to stress about the difference of a few seconds. Just keep it under [two] minutes.”Source: WistiaHowever, optimal length can vary depending on the topic. “If you produce something as catchy as BuzzFeed and Refinery29 are putting out there, it can be up to five minutes long,” says Hunersen.Regardless of the length of your video, Hunersen reminds us that all Facebook videos start without sound, meaning users have to make a conscious decision to stop scrolling through their feeds and unmute the video. Facebook videos should be visually compelling from the get-to, make sense without sound, and be engaging enough to encourage the user to stop and watch.3) TwitterQuick reference:Tweets: 140-character maximumDoes not include images, videos, polls, or quotes tweetsIdeal length is 120-130 characters Social Media Campaigns Topics: Featured Resource: How to Use LinkedIn for Business & MarketingOriginal ContentWith LinkedIn’s publishing platform, users can now compose and share original written content with their networks, or publicly. Of course, that comes with its own character counts, according to Foote:Post headline: 100Post body: 40,0005) InstagramQuick reference:Bio: 150-character maximumHashtags: Maximum of 30Captions: Ideal length is under 125 charactersSince Instagram is, first and foremost, a platform for sharing photos and videos, the primary focus is typically your visual content. However, it’s always helpful to provide some context, and let users know what they’re looking at.Given that, here are some helpful character counts for the text you include with your visual content:Bio: 150Hashtags: Up to 30CaptionsWhile Instagram doesn’t seem to specify a maximum total number of caption characters, it does note that, within users’ feeds, the caption is cut off after the first three lines. For that reason, it’s advised to limit captions to 125 characters. However, don’t leave out important information just for the sake of keeping your entire caption visible. Instead, frontload it with crucial details and calls-to-action, leaving any hashtags, @mentions, or extraneous information for the end.As for Instagram Stories, there doesn’t seem to be a ton of detail on character limits there, either. However, because the text overlays the visual content — which is the focus — don’t obscure too much of the photo or video with a caption.6) SnapchatQuick reference:Character limit: 80 per postSpeaking of not obscuring visual content — that brings us to Snapchat.Instagram Stories was, many believe, an effort to emulate the features of Snapchat, to create an opportunity for users to share quickly-disappearing photos and videos. And again, because the focus here is on the visual, you’ll want to prevent distracting viewers from it with too much text.According to Teen Vogue, Snapchat’s character limit is 80 per post, which is more than double its previous 31-character limit. And, if you’re looking for more guidance, just look to this particular app’s name, and remember the “snap” element of it — a word that implies brevity — and try not to ramble. Here’s a great example of how SXSW uses its captions efficiently:7) YouTubeFeatured Resource: YouTube for Business – A 30-Day RoadmapHere we have yet another network that’s focused on visual content, leading some to incorrectly assume that accompanying text — like titles and descriptions — don’t matter as much.That’s not entirely false — as a video-hosting platform, YouTube should primarily be used to showcase a brand’s quality videos. However, like any other visual content, it needs context. People need to know what they’re watching, who it’s from, and why it matters.Unfortunately, YouTube doesn’t appear to provide any specific parameters over its character counts — except for your channel description, which according to the official help site is limited to 1,000 characters. But other than that, it seems that the only guideline available is the alert display that lets you know, “Your [title or description] is too long,” if you’ve entered too much text in either of those fields.In this case, we would advise taking the same approach as adding text to support your visuals on Instagram and Snapchat. Like the former, a video’s description is cut off after the first line or two, so frontload the most important descriptors and CTAs, leaving extra details for the end.Show Your CharacterAs you set out to determine the length of your text, regardless of the platform, remember to do so with the user in mind. Many of these channel-mandated character limits are established for that reason — to keep audiences from getting bored or overwhelmed.Like anything else in marketing, however, it’s never an exact science, despite the best data. We encourage you to follow these guidelines, but don’t be afraid to experiment if they don’t always work. Test different amounts of text within your various channels, and keep track of how each post performs. From there, you can make decisions about which types of content, as well as its accompanying titles and descriptions, are the most well-received from your audience.How do you approach text with different online channels? Let us know in the comments.This post was originally published in January 2016 and has been updated for accuracy and comprehensiveness. When it comes to writing text for your blog and social media posts, many marketers wonder, “But what’s the character limit?” It’s never a simple question — sometimes, it’s answered by parameters established by certain channels. And on other occasions, it’s more a question of what’s ideal.For example, you probably know the character limit for a tweet is 140, but did you know that the ideal length is actually less than that? (Hold tight — we’ll explain why.) While we’ve written before about optimizing your actual content, we thought it would be helpful to gather the numbers of character limits — both enforced and ideal — for different online channels, all in one place.Click here to download our free ebook on how to start a successful blog for your business or project.Below, you’ll find a more detailed guide to character limits and ideal character counts for posts on your blog, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, SnapChat, and YouTube.The Length & Character Count for Everything on the Internet1) Blog PostsSource: MediumQuick reference:Post length: 2100 wordsTitle: Under 60 charactersMeta Description: Under 155 characters Don’t forget to share this post! Featured Resource: How to Use Twitter for BusinessLength of TweetsMarketers everywhere rejoiced when Twitter finally eased up on its character count parameters, and such media as images, videos, and polls, as well as quoted tweets, ceased counting toward its 140-character limit.Still, the “Quote Tweet” feature remains available, providing even greater character-saving measures. That happens when you press the rotating arrow icon to retweet a post, and then add a comment in the text box provided. You’ve still got 140 characters all to yourself to comment. Hashtags: No more than twoVideos: Maximum length is two minutes and 20 secondslast_img read more

The Anatomy of a Perfect Blog Post

first_img How to Write a Blog Post Works, huh? 9) ConclusionWhen you’re ready to wrap up and sign off, make sure to let your reader know the article is closing. Your conclusion doesn’t need to be lengthy, but it should serve to recap the blog post the reader just finished and provide more resources and guidance, if wanted. More on that next.10) Call to ActionFinish your conclusion with a meaningful call to action (CTA) for your reader — whether it’s advice, a content offer, or a link to another related blog post. Use the last lines of your post to leave the reader feeling like he or she learned something from you — and like there’s even more to learn from you, creating the desire to click a link or CTA image and read more.For more ideas on how to write a killer blog post, learn from our analysis of 175,000 B2B and B2C blog posts.What’s your go-to blueprint for a blog post? Share with us in the comments below. We also found that headlines ending with a bracketed clarification — for example, “The Definitive Guide to Business Blogging [New Data]” — performed 38% better than titles without that clarification.If you’re having trouble trimming down the length of a title, run it through SEOmofo and Twitter to see how the title will appear on SERPs and when it’s shared on social media.2) Meta DescriptionThe meta description doesn’t live on your blog post — it lives somewhere different that’s just as important.The meta description refers to the HTML attribute that explains the contents of a given web page. Basically, it’s a short description you see on a SERP to “preview” what the page is about. Check it out below:The headline, URL, and meta description work together to convince searchers to click on a link to read the entire blog post, so you’ll want to put thought into what to write for this piece of your blog post, too.In our analysis, we found the ideal meta description length is under 155 characters.3) Featured ImageFeatured images usually sit at the top of a blog post and are another element to draw readers in to learn more. The image should reflect what the story is about, intrigue readers, or provoke them. It shouldn’t be too literal or obvious, and it can simply be aesthetically pleasing, too.Here’s an example of one of our featured images. It features a mobile phone and a bright yellow color — fitting, considering I was writing about Snapchat:Make sure you choose featured images that you’re legally able to edit and distribute. Here are some of our suggestions:The Free Stock Photos You’ve Been Searching ForNegative SpaceStockSnap.io4) IntroductionThe introduction needs to quickly hook your reader and convince her to read the rest of your blog post. It also has to let the reader know what your post is about, so she knows what she’s getting. Nobody likes clickbait, so you want to make sure your post is about what the headline says it is.Whether your approach is humor, interesting and surprising facts, or asking a question, find a way to make the first lines of your blog posts as attention-grabbing as possible. Write an introduction that would make you want to keep reading an article — a quick few paragraphs to draw the reader in and let him know what he’s about to read.Here’s an introduction my colleague, HubSpot Staff Writer Aja Frost, wrote that does this effectively:Frost uses a cliffhanger approach here — and now I want to read more to learn about how hard it is to be an entrepreneur. For more introduction inspiration outside of HubSpot Blogs, I recommend reading posts on Medium and Buffer.5) Sub-HeadersSub-headers are another on-page SEO element that helps your blog post to rank in Google Search. Sub-headers organize and break up your blog post into different sections to signal to Google (and your reader) what the post will cover.Sub-headers should be written with H2 tags or smaller — never H1 tags, which signal a title. Use sub-headers to split up sections of your blog post — making sure to integrate the keywords you’re using this post to target.In this particular post, I’m targeting the keywords “perfect blog post,” which I’ve used in my title and the first sub-header.6) Body The meat of your blog post — separated by various sub-headers, of course — is where your readers will undoubtedly derive the most value. In our analysis, the ideal blog post length is roughly 2,100 words, but that will vary depending on your topic. Medium found that posts that took seven minutes to read earned the most engagement and attention, and serpIQ found that most of the top-10 Google results are between 2,032 and 2,416 words.7) DataWhenever it’s possible to use data and numbers, do so. Numbers written as numerals (23) instead of words (twenty-three) have been shown to attract reader attention when they quickly scan what they’re reading online. Additionally, numbers represent facts — which are unimpeachable and most trusted by your readers.If you’re using numbers or data in your blog post, add [Data] or [Research] to your headline for additional impact, as we discussed earlier in the post.8) Multimedia ElementsWe’ve told you a few times that your reader is having trouble staying focused, so wherever it’s possible to use multimedia content to break up the blog post and re-engage your reader, add images, videos, audio recordings, and social media posts. Changing up the format of your blog post will provide additional value to your reader while making sure their eyes are focused on what they’re reading and seeing. Originally published Jun 1, 2017 8:00:00 AM, updated April 24 2019 Even though we all are crunched for time, spouting off a mediocre blog post for the sake of hitting a deadline isn’t worth it. Considering our audiences have access to countless other articles, it’s unlikely that they’d settle for a half-baked attempt.Download 6 Free Blog Post Templates NowWe get it, though: It can be difficult to keep track of all the right blog components when you’ve got a full plate of projects. There’s a lot to remember when crafting a solid blog post — which means there’s also a lot to forget.To make sure nothing slips through the cracks and every one of your blog posts is both comprehensive and useful to your readers, we’ve created a rundown of everything you need to remember when you start writing. Bookmark this blog post, and make sure you’ve completed this checklist the next time you press “publish.”How to Write a Perfect Blog Post1) HeadlineEvery great blog post starts with a headline that grabs the reader’s attention, and compels them to click and keep reading to learn more. Internet readers have very short attention spans — around eight seconds in length — and the headline is one of the critical first elements that help readers decide if they want to click and stay on your site. In fact, 60% of readers don’t read past the headline, which presents a big opportunity. Here’s how to write a great headline:Brainstorm a Working TitleStart with a working title in mind and brainstorm how to make the angle as interesting as possible. This is the phase of blogging where you start with a general topic and narrow down exactly what you want to write about that topic.For example, if I want to write about the topic of “blogging,” I need to come up with a more specific working title first. And those working titles depend on the format of my blog post. Whether you’re writing a listicle, an explainer article, or a how-to guide, brainstorm a few titles to guide your research. Here are a few ideas:The Guide to Business BloggingHow to Get Started with Blogging10 B2B Blogging Strategies We Love (and Why)Once you have an angle you want to pursue, it’s time for keyword research.Conduct Keyword ResearchKeyword research will help you create a headline that will perform well on search engine results pages (SERPs). Your headline is one of many factors Google considers when ranking results on SERPs, and an optimized title will help people find the information they need more easily.Tools like Google’s Keyword Planner, SEMrush, and HubSpot’s keywords tool can help you determine exactly which terms people are searching for, and which will be easier or more difficult for your new blog post to rank for.”Blogging” is a broad search term, and when I dropped it into SEMrush, more than 75,000 keyword results were returned. We recommend targeting long-tail keywords that are more specific to the exact audience you’re targeting — which you can learn more about by creating buyer personas.When I searched for “business blogging,” on the other hand, I found keywords with lower search volume, but would be more specifically targeted to the audience I’m trying to reach.Once you’ve nailed the keyword you’re targeting, you can create your final title, as well as your headers (more on that later). For the purposes of this example, I chose, “The Definitive Guide to Business Blogging.”Craft a TitleWhen it comes to the art of the perfect blog post, we’ve done some analysis and looked at how our own titles have performed. Here are the consistent principles we found:The ideal blog post title length is 60 characters.Headlines between 8 and 12 words are shared most often on Twitter.Headlines between 12 and 14 words are liked most often on Facebook. Don’t forget to share this post! Topics:last_img read more

Why the ‘Pivot to Video’ Is Dangerous for Publishers

first_img Video Marketing When I read that the average American spends five-and-a-half hours per day watching video content, I scoffed. Between video explainers on Facebook, Game of Thrones, and Netflix, that average is closer to my daily minimum time spent watching videos.After all, 2017 was “the year of video” — why shouldn’t people consume more videos, and why shouldn’t creators make more?As it turns out, there is such a thing as too much video. Publishers like MTV News, which laid off most of its editorial crew last year to focus on video; and Vox Media, which scaled back its video team this year, have seen how hazardous a “pivot to video” can be.Click here to learn how to create and utilize video in your marketing to increase engagement and conversion rates.No, not that kind of pivot. I’m talking about the “pivot to video.”What is pivoting to video? It’s not changing seats on the couch to get a better view — it’s the latest example of marketers and content creators being so eager to adopt a new platform or medium that they ruin it.What Is a Pivot to Video?Pivot to video (verb): To decrease or entirely shutter written editorial operations to focus on creating more video contentSynonyms: restructuring, reorganizing, refocusingIf this sounds like a joke … well, the dictionary definition is kind of a joke. But “pivoting to video” consists of publications deciding to focus so entirely on video that entire writing and editorial staff are laid off completely.It started with MTV News.You might not be surpised to hear this — after all, the word “television” makes up two of the three letters in MTV. But after an organizational restructuring at MTV in 2015, long-form editorial and video content about politics, culture, and social issues helped improve the network’s ratings and engagement on web properties. MTV News staffed its team with content creators who produced documentary-style videos and 4,000-6,000-word long-form written pieces — most of whom were let go in June of this year, when MTV News “pivoted” to create more short-form music and entertainment video over long-form editorial pieces.Twitter was flooded with tweets from former employees announcing their newfound employment status, friends calling for publishers to hire them, and content creators from all media decrying — and defending — the strategic pivot. .@MTVNews I’m a fan of video. I work in video. But behind strong video, you also need strong storytellers. https://t.co/LBgJZpi9mw— Traci Lee (@traciglee) June 28, 2017 How’s that video push working out for everyone? – Vox Media Lays Off 50 Staffers, or 5% of Workforce https://t.co/wha3GyOVjo via @variety— Merrill Barr (@MerrillBarr) February 21, 2018 Topics: Originally published Mar 6, 2018 7:15:00 PM, updated March 07 2018 I’ve been in digital media for 12 years. One thing I’ve learned is that nobody wants to read anything over 1,000 words. MTV is more proof.— Andy Gray (@AndyGray35) June 28, 2017 I’ve been laid off by @MTVNews. I’ll miss seeing my brilliant, talented colleagues, and I look forward to continuing my career elsewhere.— Jamil Smith (@JamilSmith) June 28, 2017center_img Fast-forward to this year (no pun intended): Facebook announces it will reduce brand and publisher content on its users’ news feeds, and Vox Media lays off 50 video producers across Racked, Curbed, SB Nation, and other online properties in its portfolio.With respect to social media, snarky tweets from within the industry aren’t the only reason to take your foot off the video gas pedal. There are a few big reasons a complete pivot to video is ill-advised. Keep reading — I’ll explain.The Reason People Pivot to VideoLet’s call a spade a spade — publishers are pivoting to video to make money.In the age of pre-roll and mid-roll advertising, it’s harder to ignore a video ad when it’s the only thing standing between you and a video you want to watch. Ads are easier to ignore when they live in the side margins and on top of written long-form articles, so publishers might see a greater opportunity to make money from placing video ads over video content.And the biggest piece of the digital advertising pie now goes not to advertisers or publishers — but to Facebook and Google. So it’s understandable that media companies and publications are doing whatever they can to drive ROI on the content they produce.But the pivot to video isn’t happening at random — these strategic reorganizations are also a nod to the growing popularity of video content, which we can’t deny — nor would we want to.We’ve blogged at length about video being engaging, in-demand, and a smart way for brands to diversify content and connect with audiences in new ways. And making videos is smart — it just shouldn’t be the only content your brand produces.It’s true that videos are growing in popularity — your audience wants to see videos, videos drive results for your business, and videos are an extremely favorable medium across different social media platforms. It’s also true that the human attention span is waning. But this doesn’t mean you should send your editorial staff packing. You don’t need to “pivot to video” to develop a smart video strategy as part of your content production engine — and we’ll show you how.What to Keep in Mind When Pivoting to Video1. People Like to ReadSetting aside for a moment the fact that the written word has been in existence for several thousand years (thank you, Flinstone family), the popularity of video content and written content aren’t mutually exclusive. In fact, audiences want more written content and more videos — so can’t we all just get along?In 2017, we learned that roughly half of consumers want to see more video content — but almost the same amount also wanted to see more news articles.But in a new HubSpot Research survey released in February 2018, we learned that the popularity of video content is increasing — especially among people 18 to 24 years old. What’s a marketer to do?Content consumption preferences are always changing, and they vary across different age groups, content formats, and subject matter. There are some cases when the written word is a better way to share information than video content — especially as people are still browsing a business’s website (and the written content included on it) more than purely video.In some cases, audiences don’t want videos at all. For example, in the United States, NiemanLab found that video isn’t growing as rapidly as one might think.In fact, roughly half of those surveyed didn’t watch any online news videos — and more than two-thirds said they consumed most news in text format. Most video being consumed was short and sweet and entertaining — leaving plenty of room at the table for written content consumption, too.So, people are watching videos, but they’re also consuming a lot of text content, too. How should publishers and content producers address the diversifying content preferences of audiences?The SolutionMake great videos and write great articles. In fact, ideally, you should be writing articles and reports, and then incorporating videos and other multimedia elements into them. Give the people what they want — which is written, visual, and audio content.Think about how your audience wants to learn. According to the survey above, people are more interested in consuming in-depth news information by reading it, whereas they might be more interested in watching shorter, more consumable video content. While a video might be a good fit for briefly explaining a complicated topic, it might not be the best fit for a detailed breakdown of SEO best practices — like in these examples.If you don’t know the answer to this question, ask your audience. If you’re not sure about your industry or audience’s preferences, ask them. Using an email newsletter or a Twitter poll, ask questions like, “What would you most like us to produce a video about?” or “Do you prefer written or visual explainers?” to figure out where to get started.The answer to the question of what types of content your audience prefers is an evolving one — and one that we constantly experiment with here at HubSpot. Read about how we’re changing up our social media video strategy in this blog post.2. Videos Are Hard to MakeVideos are hard to make — and it shows.The internet is populated with far too many slideshows and photos set to music that are masquerading as videos — like this one:Videos like these don’t offer the viewer much more value than reading a story would, but publishers keep making them — presumably because they get more clicks on social media than an article would.I don’t know about you, but I find these videos extremely annoying — they either autoplay when I open an article, or I click them to learn more and get no additional information out of them.Instead, publishers and brands should be striving to make great videos — which are driven by great stories. You need good storytelling to create a compelling video, and — guess what? That will require the writing of a script or outline beforehand, and writers and editors can be of tremendous value there.Additionally, if you remember our finding above, audiences don’t just want one thing — they want it all. Consumers want multimedia articles, in-depth research reports, blog posts, and entertaining videos. There’s plenty of room for cross-collaboration between writers, editors, and video producers to create excellent content that solves for constantly-changing consumer preferences.The SolutionBefore implementing a video strategy, invest in resources to do it well, and experiment with creating different videos for different segments of your audience.This means taking the time (and resources) to invest in video equipment, filming, and editing software, and freelancers or new employees who can make videos — more specifically, who can make videos well.By investing in video content up front, you’ll ensure that your entire content production team is firing on all cylinders and creating video content that can both eventually rank in search results, and generate millions of views organically — not just as an ad.3. Videos Are Tough to DistributeWith the exception of a few major publications — with content production budgets in the millions — it’s hard to crack the code of not only how to make great videos, but how to monetize them and use them to drive leads, customers, and revenue.That’s partly because digital video is such a new content medium, and content creators are figuring out how to make great videos (see above). It’s also because Google search ranking factors and social media algorithms change so frequently, it’s hard to nail getting videos surfaced and seen by people on different platforms. Facebook’s shift to a more friends- and family-oriented news feed this year is a testament to this, and outlets like Vox Media know it all too well.Plus, now that more people are jumping on the video content creation bandwagon, search engines and social networks are getting saturated with more videos to compete against.So you might think that video creation is the hard part, but that’s just the beginning. It takes concerted effort for videos to rank in YouTube and Google search results, or to rack up thousands and millions of views on Instagram and Facebook. And even if you do everything right, there could be a reason your audience doesn’t want to watch your videos: They might not want to turn up the volume, they might be running low on their monthly data plan, or hey — they could even be sitting on the toilet.People have their preferences, and our recent survey above, we know consumers want to see video content alongside in-depth news articles and research content — and that they want to watch videos on social media. People stream millions of hours of video content across social platforms every day, but these popular social videos might not generate leads at the speed a growing business needs.The SolutionWe suggest creating multimedia content that serves a variety of purposes on a variety of different platforms. For example, keyword-specific blog posts and YouTube videos might quickly rank in Google and YouTube searches, to help drive visitors to landing pages and lead forms that help brands start selling. On the other hand, entertaining, short-form videos on Facebook and Instagram will help spread a brand’s message and attract more people to a website down the line.If you’re just getting started with video marketing, consider the type of video you should make first. Use them to help guide visitors along your marketing funnel — alongside written content and offers to capture lead information.Make specific types of videos for specific platforms in the same way you would for different types of written content. That way, the videos you create will have specific goals in mind — for example, video views, video view rate, or website clicks — that you can measure and iterate on.Videos achieve outcomes on social media that written content might not, and written content can achieve search engine rankings that videos might not. The best scenario is to create both types of content — along with multimedia content — to meet audiences’ ever-changing preferences, and to attract visitors and leads throughout the marketing funnel. But the pivot didn’t stop there.Over the past year thus far, several major publishers have pivoted, structured, reorganized, and refocused on creating video content — at the cost of writers’ and editors’ jobs. Sports Illustrated, Fox Sports, Vice, and HuffPost have all focused efforts on creating short-form video content — and all have laid off writers and editors. One publication — Vocativ — laid off its entire editorial staff “to focus exclusively on video content.”In fact, “pivoting to video” has become such a ubiquitous term in the digital space that it’s become a joke in and of itself. Images: Tumblr, HubSpot Research, NiemanLab the WH communications department is pivoting to video— Gideon Resnick (@GideonResnick) July 31, 2017 Quit doing this. No one wants video. We all read faster than people talk, it eats up data, and you can’t watch video on the toilet at work. https://t.co/cctmoHKiwz— Peter Lynn (@Peter_Lynn) July 21, 2017 Don’t forget to share this post!last_img read more

2008 X BLADES NTL BEST OF ENEMIES ALL IN THE FAMILY

first_imgRelated Filesbest_of_enemies_feature___2-pdf The 2008 X Blades National Touch League to be contested in March 2008 at the BCU International Stadium in Coffs Harbour has been themed “The Best of Enemies”.The showcase event on the TFA calendar unites players, coaches, selectors, referees, officials, and supporters from across the Country in Coffs Harbour for the Annual Touchfest that will, for the first time in the 11 year history of the event, see the Open and Senior tournaments overlapping. “Catching up in Coffs” has become a tradition for Australia’s Touch Football community and some great on field rivalries have emerged over time that have transcended the boundaries of combat into firm friendships, epitomizing the best ideals of sport.Touch Football Australia National Media Coordinator Karley Banks continues the second installment in a three week series focusing on the “Best of Enemies” rivalry between the South Queensland Sharks and the Sydney Mets, two of the sport’s big gun franchises in the three premier Open divisions of Women’s, Men’s, and Mixed.This week the highly competitive Men’s Open “Best of Enemies” feature looks at the sibling rivalry between the Jones brothers Nathan (Sharks) and Aaron (Mets) and Australian Men’s open superstars Ben Robinson (Sharks) and Jason Stanton (Mets).Please click onto the below attachment for the full story.last_img read more

9 months agoAllardyce withdraws from Huddersfield manager vacancy

first_imgAllardyce withdraws from Huddersfield manager vacancyby Freddie Taylor9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveHuddersfield Town will not appoint Sam Allardyce as their new manager.The Terriers parted ways with David Wagner on Monday by mutual consent.The German leaves with the club currently bottom of the table and eight points from safety. Reports had suggested that Allardyce was in the running for the role, given his history with saving clubs from relegation.But the former England boss has distanced himself from those links.He told talkSPORT: “As much as I like Huddersfield, it’s very difficult job indeed. For me, and I know the fans won’t want to hear this, it’s got to be about planning for relegation and then planning to get back into the Premier League.”For me, at this stage of my life if they made an approach I would chat with them, but I think it’s very unlikely, Alan.”They’ve only scored 12 goals in 22 matches, and while I’ve managed to pull teams out of the bottom end, at Sunderland I had Jermain Defoe and at Crystal Palace I had Wilfried Zaha and Christian Benteke.”Huddersfield’s trouble is not their performances, it’s a lack of goals and we all know what it means when you have a goalscorer.”It’s a very difficult task.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

John Kerry Welcomes Moroccos Initiatives to Uphold Human Rights in Sahara

first_imgRabat – US secretary of state John Kerry welcomed, on Friday in Rabat, Morocco’s initiatives to uphold human rights in Sahara.“The Secretary welcomed the recent actions and initiatives taken by Morocco to continue to protect and promote human rights in the territory (Sahara),” said a joint statement issued after the 2nd USA-Morocco strategic dialogue, which was co-chaired by Kerry and foreign minister Salaheddine Mezouar.The US secretary of state underlined the growing and important role of the National Council for Human Rights. Washington and Rabat affirmed their shared commitment to the improvement of the lives of the people of the Sahara.last_img read more