Lamar’s Chastadie Barrs Records 500th Career Steal to Earn Player of the Week Honors

first_imgFRISCO, Texas – Lamar’s Chastadie Barrs is the Southland Conference Women’s Basketball Player of the Week, conference officials announced Thursday. All Southland weekly awards are presented by MidSouth Bank.The senior guard averaged 21.5 points, 11 rebounds, 10 steals and seven assists across Lamar’s two victories. Barrs also boasted a 51.7-percent average from the field and a 50-percent shooting mark from beyond the arc.Women’s Basketball Player of the Week – Chastadie Barrs, Lamar – Sr. – Guard – DeSoto, TexasBarrs recorded her fifth and sixth career triple-double performances during week seven, boosting the Cards to a 93-37 win over Howard Payne and an 82-66 victory over University of the Pacific.With the pair of wins, Lamar’s home winning streak is extended to 33 straight, marking the second longest active streak in the NCAA.In LU’s win over Howard Payne, the senior recorded her 500th career steal, becoming the fourth NCAA Division I women’s basketball player to record 500 or more career steals. The guard hit a season-high four three-pointers against Howard Payne and ripped a season-high 10 steals in each in each of her two most recent games.Honorable Mention: Cassidy Barrios, Nicholls; Dalesia Booth, Texas A&M-Corpus Christi; Jaylonn Walker, Sam Houston StateSouthland weekly award winners are nominated and voted upon by each school’s sports information director. Voting for one’s own athlete is not permitted. To earn honorable mention, a student-athlete must appear on 25 percent of ballots.last_img read more

BMW Board Member Talks About Electric Car Cost Nightmare

BMW Fans Just May Be Coming Around To Tesla BMW Exec On Tesla’s Sale Ramp: It’s Putting Pressure On Segment ELECTRIC VEHICLE ‘NIGHTMARE’ IS HAUNTING BMWOver half a century ago, the auto industry fought against seat belts. Then, in the 1970s, they fought against smog regulations because of expensive catalytic converters. They also opposed other safety standards like airbags. Today, legacy automakers cling to diesel and fight against reducing emissions. The latest target of their displeasure and dismay? Well, it’s obvious — they complain about a transition to electric vehicles.Related Content: Above: Tesla’s Model 3, meanwhile, goes Pac-Man on BMW and the entire mid-size luxury sedan market* (Source: Reddit / Lord Zeekos via Twitter / Walter MacVane)An example, he claims, is cobalt. “When everybody wants to have cobalt, the prices of cobalt will not go down, they will go up,” Frölich predicts. Nevertheless, he says BMW is working to secure low prices for cobalt out until 2030. “We are the only ones who are doing that,” Frölich claims. Hmmm.Even though BMW plans to grow its portfolio of electrified vehicles, Frölich sounds anxious about leaving the gas-guzzling internal combustion engine behind. “So, it’s a nightmare that an electrified vehicle will cost the same as a combustion-engined car,” Frölich says. So, it’s no wonder BMW fans are backing away from the brand. And (more than) a few are coming around to Tesla.===Source: news.com.au / *Chart sourced from US sales data via Good Car Bad Car for September 2018 (Note: Tesla doesn’t break out sales by country, and the Model 3 tally assumes some deliveries to customers in Canada)*Editor’s Note: EVANNEX, which also sells aftermarket gear for Teslas, has kindly allowed us to share some of its content with our readers, free of charge. Our thanks go out to EVANNEX. Check out the site here. Let’s Look At Tesla Sales Against Rivals: BMW & Mercedes Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on October 7, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News *This article comes to us courtesy of EVANNEX (which also makes aftermarket Tesla accessories). Authored by Matt Pressman. The opinions expressed in these articles are not necessarily our own at InsideEVs. Above: Visions for the future differ from Tesla and BMW (Image: Teslarati)A recent example comes to us courtesy of BMW. John Carey (via news.com.au) sat down with Klaus Frölich, the 58-year-old BMW board member in charge of development. According to the senior BMW exec, electric vehicles will always be more costly than gas-burners. “No, no, no,” was Frölich’s reply when asked if EVs will ever equal the prices of equivalent conventional cars. “Never.”“It’s very simple,” says Frölich. In EVs with 90 to 100kWh battery packs, the cell cost alone will be $17,000 to $25,000. “You can produce whole cars, only with the cost of the battery,” he says. And Frölich doesn’t buy into the theory that when batteries are being produced in larger numbers, prices will fall. Instead, he deflects — noting certain materials in batteries which may become more expensive. Source: Electric Vehicle News read more