Debbie Qaqish Explains How Small Businesses Can Increase Lead Volume & Quality

first_img Digital Body Language – This phase is the “operationalization” of the solution and is broken down into Beginner, Intermediate, and Advanced company stages. Each sub-phase is characterized individually and highlights the “growth in the competency.” Engage – In this phase, the work of implementing the solution, integrating the solution with CRM, and setting up processes for how to use the system occurs. Training also takes place in this phase. SEO for Lead Generation Kit We also observed that marketers with a strong traditional brand or creative background, were struggling to make the change to demand-generation marketer. I caught up with Debbie via email after her talk, and she answered a few questions about demand generation, marketing automation and the ways in which small business can take advantage of both. – In this phase, the Use Cases are utilized to obtain approval from senior management and to help select the right lead management system. . help pull opportunities through the sales funnel quicker A: I think having a strong background in sales is part of why our firm is such a leader in this space. Demand generation is all about working with both sales and marketing to produce high quality leads and then to use some of these same technologies to make better pursuit decisions in the sales cycle. If I did not have a solid sales background, I think this would be a harder leap for me to make and harder for my clients to understand. A: The best are the marketing automation vendors themselves. I remember the first time I saw Eloqua – I wanted my sales people to be able to sell like my Eloqua rep. The same is true of marketers. Quite often I hear comments like, “I want to run campaigns or set up lead nurturing like you did to me!” If you enter into a sales cycle with one of these vendors, you will get a best practices example of how you can most effectively use this technology. , Align A: Great question and it’s one that we educate on quite consistently in all of our speaking engagements and certainly with all of our clients. A: These seem like practices that would only be practical for big companies with deep pockets. Is that true? (Besides the HubSpot Blog and the A: Great question! 2. Not having a common language of leads improve marketng efficiencies drive revenue through high quality lead generation Q: Where should small businesses start with marketing automation? What’s really cool about demand generation practiced with sophisticated marketing automation is that there are only about 2,000 companies who are practitioners. This is still a very early category that is growing at about a 2x rate. A: Great new book by Steve Woods – ” . Q: You have a very strong background in sales, but you’re now a principal at a firm that helps companies with demand generation and marketing automation. Can you explain the transition? Laura Ramos We did a study last year in which we interviewed leaders in demand generation and also did a large online survey with OMS. One of the more interesting findings from the study was that we are now seeing a variety of backgrounds including sales, finance and operations as becoming common for those marketers responsible for demand generation. Q: What are the two most common problems that you see when you begin an engagement with a company? Originally published May 13, 2009 5:43:00 AM, updated October 20 2016 Online Marketing Summit Download our 1. Non-alignment of sales and marketing Sirius Decisions Q: What do you read — and what should marketers and small business owners read if they want to learn more about this world? Get Resultscenter_img – In this phase, marketing is gathering information and is beginning to educate themselves and senior management. This phase begins to build buy-in for implementing a demand generation solution. Demand generation is the revenue-focused set of activities of both sales and marketing that: our web site DemandGen Report Q: What companies do you look to as examples? Who has most effectively implemented marketing automation solutions? – In this phase, the important work of aligning sales and marketing begins and common ground is reached for establishing the critical criteria for success with demand generation. Sales and marketing work together to create a set of Use Cases, which will help them select the right lead management system. The Use Cases will define how they can best use a solution to generate leads and revenue. They’re also a tool used to cement buy-in from senior management. While both of these sound obvious and perhaps simple, it happens in every company we work with. Improving the alignment of sales and marketing for successful demand generation is wrapped into all of the core processes we employ while working with our clients (using Life of a Lead, Lead Scoring, Lead Management, SLAs and Guiding Principles). In addition, creating a common lead language (a natural output of Life of a Lead and Lead Scoring) is the first output of all of our engagements. For any company, working with any marketing automation system, having these two key elements in place, will go a long way towards ensuring demand generation success. , , a firm that helps companies improve their lead volume and quality. , “, anything from Pedowitz Group blog !) Every engagement we have with a client begins with a Business Process Review which involves BOTH sales and marketing. In this process, we document the Life of a Lead and create a lead scoring framework. This BPR helps the dialog and understanding between sales and marketing. So while we are facilitating, we are wearing both the sales and marketing hat. If I had a traditional marketing background, this would be much harder to facilitate. At last week’s Select These technologies work both in the marketing lead generation funnel and the sales funnel. Marketing automation is a poorly chosen term that describes an emerging category of Web 2.0 technoloy designed to: Learn more about how you can optimize your site to get found online in search engines to generate more leads for your business. Q: Let’s backtrack for a minute: What, exactly, do you mean by demand generation and marketing automation? A: We have a very clear process for how any company should start with marketing automation. We call it the LASER Apporach – Learn, Align, Select, Engage, Get Results. You can learn more about the best practices methodology for getting started with demand generation on get quality leads into the top of the sales funnel MarketingSherpa Q: Absolutely not! We work with many start-up and small to medium sized businesses (SMBs) who have embraced these technologies and practices to make a huge difference in their revenue picture. Just in the last year, the number of solutions that are available to this market has grown rapidly and with that growth has come many options and pricing ranges. Additionally, we are seeing VCs taking an interest in these technologies as they see them as a way to help ensure revenue growth. Pedowitz Group at Forrester Research. Learn The conclusion: having a sales background is excellent for this space. and if you don’t know about how sales works in your company today, find out! in Boston one session stood out for me: Debbie Qaqish’s fantastic talk on demand generation essentials. Debbie is chief revenue officer at the search engine optimization for lead generation kit Topics: Passing Leads to Sales Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

11 Essential Elements of a Well-Designed Marketing Ebook

first_img Originally published Apr 6, 2012 2:39:00 PM, updated July 28 2017 Topics: Design How many ebooks does your marketing team have in its content arsenal? With the rise of tablet and e-reader popularity, ebooks are only growing in popularity. According to a newly released report by Pew Internet , in mid-December 2011, 17% of American adults had reported they read an ebook in the previous year; by February, 2012, the share increased to 21%. While we’ve always considered ebooks to be one of the best lead-gen content assets at a marketer’s disposal, the fact that on-the-go content is only carving out more of a place in today’s increasingly mobile world makes them an even smarter choice as a marketing offer .As a piece of long-form content, a lot of work must go into the creation of a well-crafted ebook . So today, let’s focus on design. How do you design an ebook that is reader-friendly, engaging, and at the same time supports your marketing goals? Let’s discuss the 11 essential elements that make up an effective marketing ebook design.  Importance of a Brand Style Guide First, a note about the role design should play in your content strategy. If ebook creation is (or you plan it to be) a big part of your content strategy, it’s wise to first spend some time establishing a consistent brand style guide to which all your marketing content — not just your ebooks, but also your presentations and other marketing collateral — adheres. This will give your publications a more professional, branded look which translates to a sense of credibility. Of course, the content itself is a huge contributing factor to the credibility and value of a publication, but even if you have quality content down pat, that doesn’t mean people still won’t judge an ebook by its cover ;)If you take a look at the ebooks HubSpot has launched in the past 6 months, for example, you’ll notice that they all have very consistent branding and design elements throughout. When you sit down with your marketing team and designer to decide on your brand style guide, establish rules for such design elements as fonts/sizes, color schemes, charts/graphs, borders for screenshots and images, headers, etc. Creating easy-to-follow guides and templates for your various marketing assets like ebooks, presentations, etc. will make it easy for you and your team to implement a consistent branding style throughout your marketing collateral. HubSpot, for example, has an ebook template created in InDesign to ensure our ebooks have a consistent look no matter who created them.Now let’s dive into the 11 essential design elements you should consider in your next ebook design. 11 Essential Elements of Effective Ebook Design 1) An Interesting, Descriptive Title Okay, so your title choice may not exactly be a design element, but choosing a title for any piece of content is definitely an art , and it shouldn’t be overlooked. The title is often the first thing someone judges before deciding whether to click on or read your ebook, especially when the content gets shared in social media. Choose a title that is both interesting and descriptive — that is, it should be indicative of what the reader will learn from reading the ebook.Unlike blog posts, ebooks are high-commitment pieces of content because of their length, so you need to make sure you’re demonstrating the value up front in a compelling way. For instance, one HubSpot ebook is titled 15 Business Blogging Mistakes & Easy Fixes with the subtitle, “How to Fix the Most Common Blogging Bloopers.” The main title is both descriptive and demonstrates value in itself, but the subtitle also makes it sound like an even more interesting read. 2) A Visual Cover So if we know that people will most definitely be judging your ebooks by their cover, you’ll want to make sure you create ones that are both visually appealing and coincide with your brand style guide. Consider how the visual revolution is playing out with sites like Pinterest cropping up and other social networks like Facebook and Google+ putting more of an emphasis on visual content , and the importance of enticing covers becomes even more evident. Make the title easy to read, include branding elements you decided on in your brand style guide, and feature an image. You’ll notice that HubSpot’s ebook covers , for example, follow the same layout and structure while each featuring a different relevant an interesting image. 3) Skill/Topic/Persona Tags Depending on your business and industry, you likely have a different buyer personas , whether you segment your target audience by demographics, skill level, topic interest, or something else. So if part of your strategy is to create content that is personalized for or targeted to these different audience segments, one helpful way to organize and differentiate between your content assets is through a tagging system. Incorporate your schema in your ebook design so your readers know which particular ebooks will be of interest to them, and which ebooks won’t. You can do this in a number of ways — through iconography, color schemes, or tags.HubSpot’s ebooks, for instance, are categorized by skill level — introductory, intermediate, or advanced — depending on the skill level of our readers. To identify which is which, we use a combination of color scheme and a category key to denote which ebooks are targeted for which skill level. If an ebook is intermediate level like our example here, the cover and color scheme throughout the book uses blue as the dominant color, and a page in the beginning of the book explains which type of audience would benefit from each skill level. Introductory content uses a charcoal color scheme, and advanced content uses an orange color scheme. We’ve also extended this tagging system to our blog. You’ll notice this particular blog post, for example, has also been tagged as ‘intermediate.’ 4) An Author Page Another design element you might want to include in your ebooks is an author page, particularly if you have multiple members of your team creating ebooks. For example, if the author of the ebook is an expert on that topic, an author page that highlights the author’s bio and relevancy to the topic is a great way to add credibility to the content. On your author page, include a brief bio of the author, a headshot, and if you choose to, a way for readers to get in touch with the author if they have questions, such as an email address, Twitter username, or phone number.As an added internal benefit, you might find that members of your team are more willing to spend time creating ebook content if they know their efforts will be recognized publicly through an author page. 5) A Table of Contents A staple for any book, both print or digital, be sure to include a table of contents in every ebook you publish. This not only gives readers a sense of how the ebook is organized, but it also makes it easy for them to reference individual chapters if they decide only certain ones are relevant to them or if they want to refer back to specific sections later. To make this even more user-friendly for your readers, some programs like InDesign make it possible for you to hyperlink chapters/sections, creating a sort of interactive table of contents and allowing readers to jump to a certain section of the ebook when they click on the corresponding link in the table of contents. 6) Chapter Title Pages Clearly distinguish one chapter to the next with chapter title pages. This gives readers a clear indication of their progress through the book and helps set the stage for the section they are about to read. It can also serve as a landing page for that interactive table of contents you may have set up in number 5. In our business blogging mistakes ebooks example, for instance, we organized the chapters by the 15 mistakes we highlight, and our chapter pages highlight which mistake the reader is going to learn about next.  7) Social Sharing Buttons We’ve talked before about the importance of including social sharing buttons on your marketing content. Sure, the landing page behind which you gate your ebook is a great place for these buttons, but why not also stamp them onto the pages of your ebooks as well? It makes sense, right? A potential reader might not feel comfortable sharing your ebook before they’ve read it and know they like the content, but while they’re reading it? That’s a different story.Add these buttons to each page of your ebook — either in the header or the footer — so readers can easily share the book with their social networks no matter how far through it they’ve read. Just be sure you’re sharing links to the ebook’s landing page — not thank-you page — if it’s gated content. HubSpot’s ebooks, for example, include social sharing buttons for LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter on each page. For help in creating these social media buttons for your ebooks, check out this handy guide . 8) Visual Elements Break up your “big chunks of copy” and “large blocks of text” with visual elements to emphasize or explain certain points more visually. We’re talking anything from headers, bolded text, and bullet points to screenshots, images, charts, and graphs. Furthermore, leverage content visualizations when appropriate to help you explain concepts that are difficult to explain through text and lend themselves to more visual explanations, as we did in this blog post , which is actually an ebook excerpt! Just be sure to keep your visuals in line with your brand style guide, translating images, graphs, and charts to conform to your guidelines in terms of style and color scheme. 9) Product/Service Call-Outs While ebooks can be catered to achieve certain goals, the way most marketers use ebooks is to generate new leads at the top of the funnel. To achieve this goal, your ebook content should be majorly educational — not product focused — in nature. But does that mean you can’t or shouldn’t sneak in a few mentions of your product or service into them when appropriate? Absolutely not! In fact, when people are just starting to learn about your business in the awareness stage of the sales cycle, they probably know very little about the products and services you offer.Use educational ebooks as an opportunity to connect your thought leadership with product awareness. One way to do this in your ebook content is with subtle product mentions and call-outs when you mention a problem or need in your ebook that your products or services address. How much of these should you include? The key here is balance. Make sure the educational value of the ebook makes up for your product awareness plugs. For example, in HubSpot’s educational ebook How to Attract Customers With Twitter, we add to the section of the ebook that discusses scheduling tweets and monitoring responses by calling to attention to the social media publishing tool available in HubSpot’s software, our paid offering. This lets readers with little or no knowledge of HubSpot’s software connect HubSpot’s thought leadership and expertise with its paid software. 10) Printer/Mobile-Friendliness While your ebook is a digital publication, you’ll likely be offering it as a downloadable file such as a PDF, and despite what you might think, many of the people who download will actually prefer to print it out and read it on paper rather than on a screen. For this reason, it’s important to make sure your ebooks are printer-friendly. For example, avoid designs that leverage double-page, horizontal layouts that don’t translate well to print. The best way to know if your design is printer-friendly? Print it yourself!Furthermore, you’ll also want to make sure your ebook file is mobile-friendly. Does your ebook PDF view well on a smartphone and various e-readers/tablets? Test it out!If you’re considering making your ebook available for sale through ebook marketplaces like the Kindle Store, things get a little bit more complicated . You’ll need to conform to the specific ebook format of that particular store, and you’ll likely need to make chan ges to the style, design, and file of your ebook. In general, you’ll need to modify your ebook to embody a very simple design with few visuals and limited formatting. Publishing services like Lulu.com can make this process more easily manageable. 11) A Final Call-to-Action The last critical element that should be a part of your ebook design is — you guessed it — a final call-to-action! After a reader has completed the ebook, what action do you want them to take next? Tell them!Perhaps you’d like to encourage them to move from the awareness stage of the sales cycle onto the evaluation stage of the sales cycle. In this case, feature a call-to-action for a middle-of-the-funnel stage offer on the last page of your ebook, introducing it to the reader in a way that is relevant and logical. In our 15 Business Blogging Mistakes ebook , for instance, we encourage readers to start a free 30-day trial of HubSpot’s software , relating it to the content of the ebook by emphasizing that readers will be able to try out HubSpot’s business blogging tools to help them fix the blogging mistakes they learned they are guilty of making. Do your ebooks have a consistent design that reflects your business’ branding? What other design elements would you add? Image Credit: Jonah Larsson Don’t forget to share this post! 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28 Creative Pinboard Ideas From Real Brands on Pinterest

first_img18) Complementary Products BoardOkay, so maybe you have a board for your own products. But you’re super helpful, too … right? Create a board for complementary — not competing — products that your audience would find useful, like AMD does in its “Laptop Bags & Cases” board. What other boards are you using to power your Pinterest marketing?Image Credit: net_efekt 19) Inspirational Industry QuotesMotivate your audience with inspirational quotes from industry thought leaders and experts. The Wall Street Journal adopts this idea in its “Quotes” board, for example. 26) A Day at the Office BoardWhat’s office life like at your company? Give your followers an idea with a board that features the goings on at your office, like Petplan does in its “Just a Day at the Office…” board. 11) User-Generated BoardBecause you can allow other users to contribute their own pins to your hosted pinboards on a user by user basis, this opens up a great opportunity to involve fans and customers in your marketing. Let Pinterest users get in on the action with a user-generated pinboard. You can either gather images and compile them into a board yourself, as the Weather Channel has done through its “iWitness Photos” board, or give specific users permission to pin content to your boards themselves, as Drake University and ModCloth have done. 10) Mission BoardGive your Pinterest followers a sense of your company’s mission and values, like the U.S. Army does in its “Army Values” board and Heart Shaped World does in its “Supporters & Causes” board. 28) Boards Organized By LocationIs your company a franchise? Maybe you just have multiple office locations around the country — or the world! Create a series of boards focused on each of your locations, as Ronald McDonald House Charities has done with its Pinterest account. Topics: 20) Events/Conferences BoardFeature awesome conferences and events in your industry, or create a board to promote an event you’re hosting yourself, as we’ve done at HubSpot with our “Inbound Conference” board. You coming? 12) Blog BoardHighlight your awesome blog content via a blog board. Just be sure each post you pin has a compelling visual within. Grand Image and HGTV both offer stellar examples of blog boards. 27) Newsjacking BoardsThat’s right. You can use Pinterest as a platform for newsjacking, too! The U.S. Army does this nicely with its “U.S. Army Olympians” board, where it highlights U.S. army soldiers who have competed or coached in the Olympics — just in time for the 2012 London Olympics! Peapod did this, too, for the Super Bowl, using its “Super Bowl Party” board to feature snack food and recipe ideas for the big game. 15) Visual Industry Data/Statistics BoardDoes your audience love data? Highlight interesting data and statistics for your industry in a visual way — through charts and graphs! Econsultancy has a cool “Stats and Charts” board, for instance. 14) Testimonials BoardAre people saying nice things about you? Share it with Pinterest! Or take a spin on this idea, like the U.S. Army does through its “‘Thank a Soldier’ Notes” board, seen below. 17) Meme BoardCreating memes to help power your social media presence in general (here’s how!)? Feature them on their own board, as we’ve done in HubSpot’s “Meme-tastic Marketing!” board. 24) Customer Interest BoardCreate boards that play to the interests of your prospects and customers. Jewelry maker Gemvara knows that a lot of its customers come looking for engagement and wedding rings, so its “‘Fit The Dress’ Recipes” board is a great choice. Similarly, HubSpot customer AmeriFirst Mortgage has its “Lavish Landscapes” board for its future and current home-owning clients. With the rise in popularity of visual content, marketers are realizing that Pinterest is a great way to show off their brands’ personalities, engage their social media fans and followers, and even generate some leads along the way. But many marketers — particularly those who represent B2B companies, are still left wondering, what in the heck should I be pinning?Well let me tell you, fellow marketers: You sure do have some options!I scoured Pinterest looking for examples of truly engaging pinboards and realized there are quite a few companies out there doing some really creative things with their Pinterest accounts. So if you’re ready to get your feet wet with visual content, here are 28 creative pinboard ideas to power your Pinterest marketing. And what’s even better? Most — if not all — of these pinboard ideas can be transferable to your own Pinterest account, whether you’re company is B2B, B2C, or nonprofit. Time to get pinning!1) Idea/Inspiration/Example BoardInspire your fans and followers! Think about your target customers’ interests and hobbies, and create a board to give them examples and ideas to inspire them. For example, Grand Image, a source of fine art for the corporate, hospitality, and healthcare design markets, uses its “Color Inspirations” board to inspire its followers with colorful examples, and Drake University uses its “Study Inspiration” board to motivate its student audience. 2) Philanthropy BoardShow off your business’ philanthropic side with a philanthropy board! Pinning images of your employees giving back to the community will show followers that your company cares about the greater good, just as FedEx has done through its “FedEx Community Involvement” board pictured below. 9) Employee BoardGive Pinterest users the opportunity to get to know the awesome people behind your brand. Petplan Pet Insurance does this creatively in its “Meet the Team” board, in which it features most of its team members with a furry friend. Furthermore, Salesforce uses its board to highlight why its employees love working at Salesforce, and Peapod profiles its employees in its “Peapod Pros” board. 7) Behind the Scenes BoardWhat happens behind the scenes that makes your company run like clockwork? Give your Pinterest followers the inside scoop with a board that highlights just what happens behind the scenes at your business. Peapod does this well with its “Where in the world is that Peapod Truck” pinboard, and General Electric makes machinery fascinating in its “From the Factory Floor” board. 5) Customer Success BoardHighlight your customers’ successes in one of your boards as Salesforce does in its Customer Success Stories” board, populated mainly by video pins. 8) Contest BoardUse your Pinterest presence to hold a contest and motivate your followers to action, like GE does with its “Freshpedition Sweepstakes” board. You can also highlight submissions to past contests, as the manufacturing company does in its “#GEInspiredMe” board. Originally published Aug 6, 2012 7:34:00 AM, updated October 20 2016 Pinterest Marketing 21) Brand Lifestyle BoardCreate boards that appeal to the lifestyle your brand promotes. Chronicle Books does this well with its “Library Love” board, for instance. 25) Industry Cartoons BoardUse a board to feature funny industry cartoons, as MarketingProfs does in its “SnarketingProfs” board. HubSpot has a board like this, too! 4) Video BoardPinterest isn’t only for pinning pretty images. Users can pin videos, too! So if videos are a part of your marketing mix, create a board just for them as Gemvara and Econsultancy have done below. 23) History BoardAppeal to the history buffs in your audience. Compile a board to highlight your history, whether its the history of your business — like in Intel’s “Our Heritage” board — or the history of your industry, as MarketingProfs features in its “History: Vintage Marketing” board. 16) Industry Infographics/Diagrams/Flowcharts BoardSimilarly, if your audience is crazy for industry-related infographics, diagrams, or flowcharts, create a board just for them, whether you’ve created them yourself or collect them from the web. Mashable has a board just like this, as does Intel! 6) Products/Services BoardWe don’t recommend you litter your Pinterest presence with product-specific pins, but we think one or two boards dedicated to your products and/or services is just fine. AMD, for example, has a board dedicated to its technology, and we have one at HubSpot, too, featuring a peek at our marketing software. 13) Content/Resources BoardPiggybacking on the blog board idea, create a board to showcase some other awesome content and resources, whether its content you’ve created or content you’ve aggregated from other sources. Petplan does this well with its “Healthy Reads” board, and HubSpot even has its own “Helpful Marketing Ebooks” board. 3) Marketing Campaign BoardUse one of your boards to feature one of your latest marketing campaigns. DoubleTree hotels, for instance, uses one of its own to highlight images depicting its “Little Things Project Tour” campaign, which travels the country to bring the guests of its hotels little things that make a big difference when traveling. DoubleTree also uses its board to link to its Facebook page about the campaign to encourage engagement there, as well. 22) Industry Tips BoardOffer some tips! You can either pin original tips you’ve visually optimized, or pin content like tip-focused blog posts you’ve written or aggregated from others. Take a look at how Petplan and CNET do it. Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

Twitter Launches Gender Targeting, and Other Marketing Stories of the Week

first_img Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Originally published Oct 28, 2012 9:00:00 AM, updated October 20 2016 SEO and Social Media Isn’t it scary how quickly the marketing world is moving these days?Search engines and social networks will roll out a new feature one week, then BOO! They’re terrifying us with a whole new update that requires us to adapt quickly and learn the new rules of the game.These updates might seem like nasty little tricks, constantly keeping you on edge, but we see them as treats just waiting to be uncovered! To help you see the treats inside the tricks, we’ve provided you with a weekly round-up of the top marketing stories of the week. Don’t be scared, just read these top articles and you’ll be prepared for the bone-chilling week ahead!Twitter Launches Gender Targeting For Advertisers, From Marketing LandYou might recall Twitter’s previous update for advertisers in the beginning of September, when they launched their targeting by interest and username for promoted tweets. Now these ad targeting abilities are diving even deeper, giving advertisers the option to target by gender. What’s interesting about this is, users don’t actually need to specify whether they’re a male or female when creating a Twitter profile. So how does Twitter know? Well according to Twitter, the platform is determining gender through public signals, including profile names and the accounts he or she follows. And where Twitter can’t accurately predict the gender of the Twitter account, they don’t, and those accounts are not included in the targeting option. Marketing Land also hinted that Twitter might be looking at certain types of phrases that are generally more common amongst men such as, “What a comeback!” or women including, “My tummy hurts.” Will you leverage this new targeting capability once it rolls out to all advertisers? If you’re interested in learning more, you can read the full story here.Facebook Brand Engagement Grows 896% [Study], From Search Engine WatchHey, remember when Facebook profiles were just a long wall of comments instead of a timeline organized by year? Do you believe that change was made just about a year ago? My, how time flies! In that one year span, Facebook engagement for brands has grown 896%, as reported by Search Engine Watch, and about 25% of that engagement came from mobile. Agile marketers have not only taken advantage of Facebook’s timeline over the past year, but they are also taking advantage of this impressive trend towards mobile Facebook usage. Additionally, Search Engine Watch reported that one in five paid search clicks came from a smartphone or tablet. This just goes to show that if you’re not thinking about mobile marketing yet, you might want to start! To see more intriguing mobile marketing stats, check out the full story here.How to Verify Your Website on Pinterest [New Feature]It’s always comforting to see that little blue ‘verified’ checkmark on specific Twitter profiles, don’t you think? Well, Pinterest is now trying out a similar concept. This ‘verified’ feature is intended to help pinners learn more about each other, highlighting your full website URL on your Pinterest profile. Before this change, Pinterest users would only see a little globe icon as the link to a user’s website, next to all other social media icons. Now, users will see the actual full link with a red ‘verified’ checkmark next to it. Perhaps these signals are a step toward more Pinterest features tailored to businesses. Just note that website verification is not available to all Pinterest accounts just yet, so you might need to wait a bit before seeing the changes on your own profile. To see where and how to verify your own profile, check out the full post here.Uncovering Marketing Benchmarks from 7,000 BusinessesIt’s difficult to know how to grow and scale your business if you don’t have many benchmarks to compare your efforts to. You might be asking yourself questions like, “If I increase my blogging frequency from once a month to twice a week, what impact will I see?” or “How much will growing my Facebook reach improve my website traffic?” Lucky for you, these questions can be answered in two different ways. One option would be to jump in and experiment with your company’s blogging frequency or Facebook reach firsthand, then measure the results. Of course, this will take some time if you want to get a decent sample size for more accurate results. Option two would be to learn from our latest study based on real results from HubSpot’s 7,000 customers. You will see exactly what sort of impact blogging frequency had on these customers, at what number of Facebook Page likes these customers saw a significant boost in traffic to their website. To get a better idea of what you need to do in order to see significant results in your marketing, take a look at the full report here.YouTube Launches InVideo Programming To Boost Video And Channel Promotion, From TechCrunchHave you ever watched a YouTube video and noticed an annotation pop up, explaining a certain part of the video? Well, YouTube just introduced a similar feature where you can include a thumbnail inside the video that you’re currently watching. These clickable thumbnails can be linked to specific videos or entire YouTube channels to help drive more traffic internally. Not only will this feature increase viewership of individual videos, but it will also help to grow a brand’s reach on YouTube and boost channel subscriptions. When you watch YouTube videos, do you tend to click on the “Related Videos” on the side once you’re finished with the one you’re watching? This new feature will essentially create a similar, constant cycle of video viewing. So as a brand, make sure you’re taking advantage of this feature and optimizing your YouTube channel to keep the attention on YOU and not on the “Related Videos” that lead a viewer outside your channel. To read more about this new YouTube feature, check out the full story here.The REAL Benefits of Guest Blogging, From SEOmozHas your company taken part in guest blogging yet? If so, are you doing it the right way and taking advantage of all the opportunities it provides? Guest blogging is often seen as solely a SEO opportunity for link building, but it’s also so much more than that! Hopefully you’re leveraging guest blogging to help build relationships and discover new business opportunities, too. Through guest blogging, you are able to capture a wider audience that you normally wouldn’t have, and develop thought leadership to help you become an expert in your industry. So when you’re contemplating guest blogging for your company, make sure to think outside the box and seek out more than just the link. If you’re interested to learn more about how guest blogging can benefit your business, take a look at the full story from SEOmoz here.What else have you learned from this week’s marketing stories? Share your learnings in the comments below!Image credit: wwarbylast_img read more

The Nonprofit Marketer’s Guide to the Millennial Persona

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack If your organization is engaging Millennials through content that’s based on their likes and dislikes, age, gender, jobs, brands they follow, stores they shop at, and ways they learn about and give to an organization, both online and offline, then you can stop reading and go get a cup of coffee.If you haven’t come up with a donor persona for Millennials and aren’t practicing inbound marketing to engage these tech-savvy Generation Y members, though, then keep reading. The reason? Because these young adults have shown a strong willingness in recent years to back causes they believe in — meaning they’re a prime demographic that could help your organization achieve its goals.To give you a clear idea of what your donor persona for this generation of volunteers and supporters should look like, let’s look at an example persona detailing the background, likes, interests, and past nonprofit work of a Millennial I know pretty well: me.An Example of a Millennial PersonaBelow, you’ll find a comprehensive profile based on myself to give you an idea of who your organization can and should be targeting.Now, this is by no means an absolute definition of the ideal Millennial your organization should be marketing to. What this example can do, though, is give you a glimpse into what a Millennial profile looks like, which can then inform how you develop your marketing strategy to reach these younger folks.Based on answers I’ve provided to questions featured in a previous post on how to create a persona using in-person interviews, here is my persona profile:Persona Name: “Techy Taylor”BackgroundGraduate of Northeastern University; studied communications and businessFour-time online fundraiserCurrent nonprofit marketer at technology company in MassachusettsDemographicsFemaleAge: 25Income between: $40,000- $75,000Location: UrbanIdentifiersEnthusiastic personalityTech-savvy (personally and professionally)On Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, LinkedIn, and InstagramGets news from New York Times and Huffington PostActive lifestyle (cyclist and rock climber)Shops online (preferred stores: Anthropologie, Zara, Gap, Amazon)Preferred Means to Interact With OrganizationsLikes to give online and/or fundraise; rarely gives via check or cashFollows several organizations on social media (mostly on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram)Will look for organizational information on a charity’s website or through word-of-mouth from a friendWill participate/fundraise in endurance events (i.e. cycling, 5Ks)Previously Supported Organizationscharity: waterCrohn’s and Colitis FoundationKrempels CenterAmerican Lung AssociationFrom this profile, your organization can understand how I like to give or fundraise, where I find my information, what other organizations I’ve supported in the past, and what type of lifestyle I live. Most of this information you can easily find online, but you can also capture this data from current constituents between the ages of 18-32 in focus groups, phone interviews, or even through a simple online survey.How to Connect With MillennialsNow that you know what a rough example of a Millennial persona looks like, you must understand where they are looking for information, how they use social media (including which channels), and — most importantly — what connects them to a cause and why they care so much to take action and support it in order to create a comprehensive persona.Millennials, like myself, are looking for a few important things when supporting or engaging with an organization:They want to get their hands dirty.Hannah Ackerman, a Millennial HubSpotter and Co-Founder of the Stahili Foundation in Kenya, says, “I’ve found that Millennials are more willing than any other generation to be first in line to volunteer their time.” If volunteering is available through your organization, let these young philanthropists go out in the field and see where the impact is actually happening, whether domestic or abroad.They want to gain professional experience.Internships are a dime a dozen, but contributing to the success of an organization by using their current skills — from accounting, to marketing, to writing — can provide Millennials not only a great personal experience, but also an insightful professional one. Plus, this generation knows that philanthropic efforts on their resumes can help them secure jobs down the line, so remember that they’re just as career-oriented as older generations when putting your persona together.They want to be able to share information socially.Data has shown that 50% of Millennials share information about charities they support with their Facebook friends, according to a recent Blackbaud study. Your next prospective advocate/donor is very likely the social friend of a current constituent. So, make it easy for them to share images, videos, and results of the organization’s work via your website or social accounts.They want to be recognized for hard work.Anum Hussain, another Millennial HubSpotter and Director of Marketing at MIST, sums up how her organization tailored its marketing for members of Generation Y.”Millennials want to be recognized, and our marketing efforts [as an organization] need to capitalize on this to help drive activity. So, when formulating our Facebook strategy, we put a strong focus on photographing all our events so students can see high-quality photos of themselves participating and be able to show off the action shots of them on their on walls. Also, when launching promotional videos, we try to incorporate B-roll from our events so students can feel a sense of fame. And when revamping our website (still in progress), we put an emphasis on having a ‘Hall of Fame’ for student recognition.”However you decide to capture this information about your Millennial donor base, just know doing so will help you create an effective marketing strategy that can engage Millennials and turn them into donors, fundraisers, event registrants, members volunteers and organizational advocates.How does your organization engage Millennials? Originally published Feb 4, 2014 4:00:00 PM, updated February 01 2017 Nonprofit Marketing Topics:last_img read more

What Makes People Distrust Your Business? [Infographic]

first_imgHere’s the thing: Many, many businesses are perfectly trustworthy — including yours, we hope. But in a world of events like headline-making data breaches, how do you get customers to see you that way?Let’s have a look at microbusinesses as a starting point. While most of them don’t account for major, household names, according to Paychex, they comprise over 75% of private-sector employers in the U.S. — and more than one in every 10 U.S. jobs. In other words: These small-to-midsize businesses are, if you’ll excuse the schmaltz, at the very core of a major economy.Download Now: Free Brand Building GuideBut the term “bootstrapping” is used so frequently within their world for a reason. When microbusinesses are first starting out, and if they maintain smaller teams, resources can be limited. There might not be a major PR firm to construct professional messaging, for example — the messaging that screams, “We are a trustworthy brand!”In that case, how do these businesses build trust among their target audiences — and what gets in the way of it?These infographics from Paychex tell a very interesting story and incorporate easy-to-digest data from its survey of over 1,000 relevant customers to gain insight on the above questions. Have a look to discover that story, and see how you can apply it to your own business efforts.95Save95Save95Save95Save95Save95Save95Save95Save95Save95Save95Save95Save Email Marketing Mistakes Originally published Oct 31, 2017 6:00:00 AM, updated October 31 2017 Topics: Don’t forget to share this post!last_img read more

LAST MINUTE CHANCE

first_imgTwo days ago Megan Campbell was on her way to Melbourne to watch the world’s best tennis players battle it out for the Australian Open. Today Megan marched, cloaked in green and gold in the Opening Ceremony of the Youth World Cup and will begin her campaign for World Cup glory as part of the Australian 18’s Women’s side this afternoon. How life can change in two days. Before this tournament, Megan had only played at National Touch League level in the Sydney Scorpions Womens Open team. She gained selection in the Womens 18’s and 20’s squads for the Youth World Cup and for NSW in the State of Origin 2004 series. Prior to her round one game today Megan had only two 45- minute training sessions with her team, but says fitting in with them on and off the field has not been a problem. “All the girls were really welcoming and really nice about me coming into the team late, they were all glad it wasn’t them,” said Megan. Even though Megan has entered the team late, she is still very proud to be playing touch at this level and representing her country. “It’s such an honor to play for Australia, I’m having heaps of fun, and it’s great to be able to interact with Touch players from all around the world,” said Megan. Andrew Knox was at Barbarians training in Western Australia just about to pass the ball when his phone rang….and it wasn’t his mum. The voice on the end of the line was Australia’s Elite programs Director, Cathy Gray asking him if he could fly to the Sunshine Coast to represent Australia in the Men’s 20’s teams at the Youth World Cup. Barbarians training and NTL’s quickly became the last thing on Andrew’s mind as he rushed home to organise time off work and flights to the Sunshine Coast. “I was pretty disappointed to not make the team originally, so I was stoked when I got the call that they needed me in the team,” said Andrew. This is Andrew’s debut at an international tournament, the highest level he has previously played being Men’s Opens for Barbarians at NTL’s. Fitting into his team on and off the field has not been a problem for Andrew either. “They’re all top blokes so it was easy to come into the team, but it did take a while to learn all their names in one day,” said Andrew. Andrew is proud to represent his country at the 2005 Youth World Cup, and feels extra privileged to be in an Australian team. “It’s great, it’s definitely not something that happens everyday,” said Andrew. By Lisa Plummerlast_img read more