Hundreds bid farewell to proud Letterkenny man Raymond Blake

first_imgLetterkenny publican Raymond Blake has been remembered as a big-hearted man who lived for his family, friends and his love of sport.The 56-year-old businessman was laid to rest at Conwal Cemetary this afternoon following his funeral mass at St Eunan’s Cathedral.Hundreds of mourners packed into the church to say a final farewell to the larger-than-life character who touched the lives of so many. Among the many people who attended Raymond’s funeral was figures from the world of sport, politics and business as well as members of the Letterkenny public whom Raymond was very much part of.His beloved St Eunan’s GAA club formed a guard of honour as Raymond was taken the short distance up Church Lane from his home on the town’s Main Street.Chief celebrant Fr Damien Nejad recalled Raymond’s love of sport including St Eunan’s but also his beloved Manchester Utd.He told on one occasion in 1999 when Manchester Utd took on Bayern Munich in Barcelona. With no direct flights to Barcelona, Raymond instead booked a flight via Lourdes but had to stop off to say some prayers as his late dad Harry would never have forgiven him if he didn’t make an effort!Among the chief mourners at the funeral was Raymond’s brothers Joe, Kevin and David and sister Ita.Local musician Declan Nee provided the moving music.As Raymond was led out of the church, a spontaneous burst of applause rang out from mourners which rippled down Market Square.Members of St Eunan’s again gave Raymond a guard of honour down the Main Street of the town he loved so well while other members of the club stood silently outside O’Donnell Park as the tricolour flew at half-mast. He was laid to rest a short time ago at Conwal Cemetary, a short distance out the road from the beloved GAA club he was so much a part of.Rest in peace Raymond.Hundreds bid farewell to proud Letterkenny man Raymond Blake was last modified: March 21st, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:funeralletterkennyRaymond Blakelast_img read more

Why Did God Create Jupiter?

first_imgDr. Jerry Bergman has taught biology, genetics, chemistry, biochemistry, anthropology, geology, and microbiology at several colleges and universities including for over 40 years at Bowling Green State University, Medical College of Ohio where he was a research associate in experimental pathology, and The University of Toledo. He is a graduate of the Medical College of Ohio, Wayne State University in Detroit, the University of Toledo, and Bowling Green State University. He has over 1,300 publications in 12 languages and 40 books and monographs. His books and textbooks that include chapters that he authored, are in over 1,500 college libraries in 27 countries. So far over 80,000 copies of the 40 books and monographs that he has authored or co-authored are in print. For more articles by Dr Bergman, see his Author Profile.(Visited 682 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Some Evolutionists Explain Our Solar System’s Unique Arrangement by Mimicking Velikovsky’s Ideasby Jerry Bergman, PhDA cover story in New Scientist on May 25 discusses the Juno spacecraft, an “audacious mission circling Jupiter’s poles” that arrived in 2016 and is schedule to orbit Jupiter until 2021. In this article, writers Leah Crane and Richard Webb give a remarkable role to the largest planet that has worked out for our benefit. They state that Jupiter is “the biggest and perhaps most important planet in the solar system…. And might even ultimately be responsible for life on the earth.”[1] To understand why, we must look at the solar system as a functioning unit, and not as a haphazard grouping of planets independently operating separately. The study of the solar system as a system has increasingly supported the conclusion that life is not about just being in the “habitable zone,” but is intricately connected with the arrangement of all the other planets.The most well-documented example of interdependence is the research indicating that our moon is required for life on Earth. There are many reasons for this. For example—unlike at Venus and Mars, which both lack a large moon—our moon’s gravitational influence helps to ensure that Earth’s spin axis is stable at an inclination of 23.5 degrees with respect to the plane of its orbit. This results in seasons. As a result, our climate variations have remained very modest throughout Earth’s history. Stabilization of the Earth’s rotation on its axis by the moon allows for a far more stable, life-friendly climate. The Earth’s tilt, called its obliquity, has not varied by much more than a few degrees for most of Earth’s recent history. Obliquity stability is necessary for climate stability, thus for human life.[2]In 1994, Jupiter disrupted Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 and then absorbed the impacts of all 23 fragments, which would have devastated Earth.Jupiter as a Protective ShieldOne theory is Jupiter, as is believed true of all of the planets, especially Saturn, Neptune and Uranus, helps to protect the Earth from damage caused by asteroids, meteorites and comets. Astrobiologist Kevin Grazier disputes this notion. “It has been widely reported that Jupiter has a profound role in shielding the terrestrial planets from comet impacts in the solar system, ….(a phenomenon often referred to as the ‘Jupiter as shield’ concept).”[3] Grazier’s own computer simulation has challenged this common assumption, but has noted another reason for Jupiter’s importance to Earth. He simulated the behavior of10,000 particles in each of the jovian inter-planet gaps for the cases of full-mass and embryo planets for up to 100 My. The results of these simulations predict a number of phenomena that not only discount the “Jupiter as shield” concept, they also predict that in a Solar System like ours, large gas giants like Saturn and Jupiter had a different, and potentially even more important, role … delivering the volatile-laden material required for the formation of life.[4]Simulation studies are problematic because they make many assumptions when designing the study, such as the need to consider all relevant conditions in the simulation that could influence the outcome.Although Webb and Crane in the New Scientist article do not mention the theory that Jupiter protects Earth from impacts, they agree with Grazier that the planet may have been responsible for sending water to the Earth.[5] The Earth is known as the water planet because it contains far more liquid water than any other planet in our solar system. Nonetheless, many observers still prefer the shield theory for many reasons. One study of the planets finds that, although asteroids, meteorites and comets regularly crash into most of the planets, comparatively few large objects have struck the Earth since its creation. The ‘Jupiter as shield’ explanation argues that most objects that would otherwise strike the Earth are pulled away from the path that allows them to reach the Earth, deflecting meteorites and other large objects.[6]As Crane and Webb correctly note, Jupiter is enormous, 140,000 kilometers across, or close to 11 times Earth’s diameter. It is not only the largest planet in our solar system, but, they claim, may even be one of the largest planets in the known universe that is very distant from its star. Although most extrasolar planets discovered so far tend to be gas giants, they are located very close to their star, unlike Jupiter. We must keep in mind that we have only explored a few planets around a few nearby stars, not the entire universe.[7] Furthermore, if the “Jupiter as shield” theory is correct, some of Jupiter’s 79 satellites contribute to the effect. One of them is larger than the planet Mercury (Ganymede) and two others,  larger than the Earth’s moon (Callisto and Io). As a result, even more objects are deflected or absorbed, causing them to miss colliding with the Earth.Additionally, if the “Jupiter as shield” theory is valid, the entire massive set of bodies in the outer solar system plays a significant role in protecting the Earth. This supports Webb and Crane’s observation that Jupiter’s “origin and early history are of huge significance not just for understanding it, but also for the wider history of the solar system.” [8] The moon’s surface area is only seven percent of the Earth’s surface area, and its effect is not as large as Jupiter’s, but because it is much closer to the Earth, its effect is not, by any means, insignificant.[9]In short, if the shield theory is valid, the Earth is protected from meteorites, asteroids and comets by all of the five planets on the Earth’s far side (Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune), plus the over 100  moons circling these planets, as well as the two planets on the side of the Earth facing the Sun (Mercury and Venus).  The charting of the orbits of the planets for decades, indicates that the Earth is in a protected zone, reducing enormously the number of potential extraterrestrial collisions.Sun and planet sizes to scale. Jupiter outweighs all the other planets combined. Credit: Lunar and Planetary Institute.Crane and Webb Had to Mention the Church’s “Persecution” of GalileoWhen discussing astronomy, it seems mandatory to mention the persecution of Galileo. The New Scientist article is no exception. They write when Galileo “discovered four moons circling Jupiter… they were the first bodies conclusively shown to be orbiting a planet other than Earth. That … helped get Galileo into a lot of trouble with the religious authorities of his day.[10]Read our biography of Galileo for more facts about the “Galileo affair.”The “Galileo affair,” allegedly perpetrated by the Catholic Church, may not only be the most quoted example of “persecution” of science by religion, but one of the most misunderstood events in history. University of New Mexico History of science professor Timothy Moy correctly observed thatUnfortunately, Galileo’s trouble with the Church later became a popular archetype for the historical relationship between science and religion. Nothing could be further from the truth. For most of the medieval and Renaissance periods, and even stretching into the eighteenth century Enlightenment, the primary supporter of research and teaching in the sciences was the Roman Catholic Church…. the Church, in the aftermath of the Galileo affair, continued to promote research into evidence for heliocentrism, even to the point of turning entire cathedrals into giant pin-hole cameras to measure the apparent diameter of the solar disk at various times of the year.[11]Galileo’s main problem, what Professor Santilana called his “fatal mistake,” was his “rash indiscretion, his insistence on throwing open to the common people, by writing in the vernacular, a question which was far from being settled.”[12] This year another book was published on this topic, this time by Fulbright scholar Dr. Michael Keas (PhD in the history of science from the University of Oklahoma). In chapter 5 of Unbelievable: 7 Myths About the History and Future of Science and Religion, Keas quotes claims of persecution by leading atheists, showing their claims irresponsibly repeat common beliefs that do not comport with history.[13]Yet, in spite of numerous scholarly studies completed by leading scholars and science historians, the myth of Galileo persists, as is illustrated by the misleading claim in New Scientist quoted above.[14] To many, watching the transit of the four Galilean moons of Jupiter across Jupiter’s surface with a telescope is a very lovely sight to scientists and religious people alike. Such evidence first witnessed by Galileo does not threaten their faith. The transit of Venus, a much rarer event, is both delightful and scientifically informative.[15]The Solar System Designed for Life on EarthThe existing design of the solar system, with rocky planets near the sun and gas giants far away, is ideal for life to thrive on Earth. As far as is known, it is unique anywhere else in the universe. Thus, the Earth appears to occupy a privileged place in the solar system and, as far as known, in the universe as well.[16] The question is, how did it get that way? In attempting to account for the origin of Jupiter and the other planets, Crane and Webb, excluding intelligent design, decided the “only way we can explain the size and disruption of the planets as they now are is if they formed somewhere else and migrated to their current positions. To move whole worlds around you need something to give them a gravitational shove.”[17] This something, they conclude, could only have been the other planets.The Ghost of Velikovsky ReturnsAlthough Crane and Webb do not mention him for good reasons, they presented an idea eerily similar to one of the most derided theories in astronomy— that proposed by Immanuel Velikovsky.[18] Velikovsky’s most well-known book Worlds in Collision was first published in 1950. The book postulates that around the 15th century B.C., the modern planet Venus was ejected from Jupiter and passed near the Earth, ending up where it is today. On its trip to where it is today, Venus altered Earth’s orbit and axis, causing innumerable catastrophes. The details of Crane and Webb’s theory are very different than Velikovsky’s account, of course, but the basic idea is similar. It invokes “Jupiter’s gravitational bulldozing” planets into different positions from where they formed. They call this idea astronomers’ “best guess” for how the planets moved around, producing the solar system existing today.Velikovsky’s idea of the solar system’s formation was treated so poorly in the 1950s and 1960s that the leading American science organization, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, agreed to hold a session on Worlds in Collision, in which Velikovsky was able to take part.[19] Nonetheless, most all of the papers presented at the session were very negative towards his catastrophic views. Velikovsky’s work is frequently cited as a canonical example of pseudoscience.[20] Yet, a team of leading cosmologists at a conference in Nice, France proposed a catastrophic theory of planet formation that is now widely accepted, including drastic rearrangements of planets that led to our present solar system. It reminds one of Velikovsky’s basic theory![21] What goes around comes around.ConclusionsThe Galileo mission (1989-2003) orbited Jupiter and sent a probe into the atmosphere, but raised even more questions.The main findings of the space probes Pioneer 11 and Voyagers 1 and 2, which gave scientists their first looks at the outer solar system, is that the more we learn about the universe, the more we realize “we are learning a lot about Jupiter … but it’s raising even more questions … [and showing there are] real mysteries still to be revealed….” This is a common reaction in most areas of science, especially astronomy where most of what scientists do is observe and discover, not run repeatable lab experiments like biochemists can. It is becoming clearer as research progresses that the intelligent design explanation, accepted for most of Western history, fits the facts better than the problematic materialistic explanations, which depend on luck.References[1] Leah Crane and Richard Webb. 2019. “Hey, Big Splendour!” New Scientist. 242(3231):34-38, May 25-31. The online version was titled “By Jupiter! How the solar system’s giant made Earth ripe for life.” [2] Ward, Peter and Donald Browenlee. 2000. Rare Earth: Why Complex Life is Uncommon in the Universe. New York, NY: Copernicus Books.[3] Grazier, Kevin R. 2016. Jupiter: Cosmic Jekyll and Hyde. Astrobiology  16(1):1-20. January.[4] Grazier, 2016. Abstract. https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/ast.2015.1321.[5] Crane and Webb, 2019, p. 37.[6] DeYoung, Don and John Whitcomb. 2003. Our Created Moon: Earth’s Fascinating Neighbor. Green Forest, AR: Master Books, p. 82.[7] Crane and Webb, 2019, p. 35.[8] Crane and Webb, 2019, p. 36.[9] Gonzalez, Guillermo and Jay Richards. 2004. The Privileged Planet. Washington, DC: Regnery Publishing, p. 115.[10]  Crane and Webb, 2019, p. 35.[11]  Moy, Timothy. 2001. “Science, Religion, and the Galileo Affair” Skeptical Inquirer. 25(5):43-49, p. 45.[12] Santillana, Giorgie de. 1955. The Crime of Galileo. Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press,  p. 18.[13] Keas, Michael. 2019. Unbelievable: 7 Myths About the History and Future of Science and Religion. Wilmington, DE: Intercollegiate Studies Institute. Chapter 5 Gagging Galileo.[14] Ronald Numbers (Editor). 2009. Galileo Goes to Jail and Other Myths About Science and Religion. Cambridge,   MA: Harvard University Press. Myth 8, pp. 68-78.[15] Lomb, Nick. 2011. Transit of Venus. 1631 to the Present. New York, NY: The Experiment, pp. 46-47.[16]  Gonzalez and Richards, 2004.[17] Crane and Webb, 2019, p. 36.[18] Bergman, Jerry. 2014. “Immanuel Velikovsky and the Worlds in Collision.” Investigator. No. 154, pp. 41-45, 25. January.[19] Sagan, Carl. 1977. “An Analysis of Worlds in Collision” in Scientists Confront Velikovsky, Ed. by Donald Goldsmith. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.[20] Gordin, Michael. 2012. The Pseudoscience Wars: Immanuel Velikovsky and the Birth of the Modern Fringe. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.[21] Crane and Webb, 2019, p. 37.last_img read more

HubSpot TV – Star Spangled Banner Ads and Blogging

first_imgEpisode #47 – July 2nd, 2009 Forum Fodder: http://www.areallygoodejob.com How do you get started with YouTube, video podcasting, live streaming, or viral videos. to learn how to use online video to grow your business with inbound marketing. 7 Ways To Develop A Unique Brand For Your Blog Enlist one new person in your company to be a communicator to spread your message. Military Marketing with www.HubSpot.tv in your tweet! karenrubin “The key for communicators is that you need to open the door and pull the curtain back.” : Happy Fourth of July!!! www.InboundMarketing.com Big Websites Start Running Bigger Display Ads. Big Mistake. Intro mvolpe Banner Ads Go Big Time Launching ideas at the U.S. Air Force Marketing Takeaway: Facebook Taking Status Updates Public (A La Twitter) Subscribe in iTunes – Marketing Takeaway: The US Air Force: Armed with social media : Think about using Facebook for business and not just as a personal social network.  from Laura Neufelder at Digital Knowledge If the US Military can open themselves up to social media, your company can too! http://itunes.hubspot.tv 24 Hours at Sea on the USS Nimitz “The blogosphere churns Headlines Facebook statuses are headed public…like Twitter One more reason to think about monitizing content through your product and not through ads. “We are not launching missiles, we are launching ideas.” Blog Branding Bonanza Marketing Tip of the Week Karen – 6. Create a better signal to noise ratio &7. Focus on achieving consistency “The real motivation was to providemarketers and agencies with the opportunity to deliver a brandedexperience directly on the pages of these very rich content sites.” Special Thursday episode! Where do I start? Marketing Takeaway: Start blogging now before your competition does to get a head start in the marketing race. Note: Karen says June, but we swear it’s July! The “bet” was that a HubSpotter could trick her into saying the wrong month. Tricky, tricky! Mike – Consistency and Unique Topic “TheOnline Publishers Association yesterday announced that 37 of itsmembers, including juggernauts like The New York Times, Forbes, ESPN,CNN and MSNBC.com are (or are soon going to start) running the new,larger ad units…” Closing “Capt.Faggard says. “I am concerned with how insurgents or potential enemiescan use Social Media to their advantage. It’s our role to provide aclear and accurate, completely truthful and transparent picture for anyaudience.” , @ out nearly 1 million posts every 24 hours” – community where you can post questions, learn about inboundmarketing, meet others, find and post jobs Webinar: How to Use Online Video for Inbound Marketing Marketing Takeaway Doing It Right Reasonablepath: Create a Target Persona, Publish Content, Optimize Content,Promote Content (build network) then think about conversion (offers,calls to action, landing pages) (Episode Length: 20 minutes, 36 seconds) Murphy Goode Vineyard Everyonein the air force is a diplomat and a communicator. Even in thecorporate world, you really can’t have just a marketing department orjust a PR department, you need to understand that everyone should beinvolved in spreading your message. Facebook Becomes Twitterific? Download the free webinar How to interact on Twitter – @ Originally published Jul 4, 2009 2:39:00 PM, updated July 04 2013 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

5 Places to Promote Your Business’ Social Media Presence

first_img Considering it’s such a hub for new activity and fresh content for many websites, your blog is often the first place people will look to see if you’re on social networks like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, etc. Add easy-to-find follow buttons to the sidebar of your blog. If you don’t have a business blog ? email The “About Us” page on your website is another logical place to promote your presence. Frequently visited by new site visitors and often a destination page for media professionals and bloggers looking for more information about your company, products, and services, your website’s “About Us” page is an obvious choice for the promotion of your social presence. 1. On Your Blog: internet marketing strategy 5 Places to Promote Your Social Media Presence but still maintain a social media presence, consider adding these follow buttons to your homepage instead. 2. On Your “About Us” Page: set up. It’s simply because they’re not promoting the presence they have! your business’ social media presence I can’t even begin to explain how frustrating it is to be searching for a specific person, business, or brand in social media only to find that … they’re impossible to find! If social media is supposed to make it easy for your fans, prospects, and customers to connect with you, shouldn’t it be easy for them to find you there in the first place? And a lot of times, it isn’t because the particular subject doesn’t have This might sound odd, but think about it. If someone is willing to Like your Facebook Page and they are also on Twitter and LinkedIn, they’ll likely be interested in your presence on those sites, too. Once you’ve created your social media accounts and optimized your profiles, the next step is to promote them and increase your reach. Don’t miss out on these 5 simple places to promote your presence. It’s as simple as adding social media follow links and buttons, but you’d be surprised how often this low-hanging fruit gets neglected…center_img social media accounts 4. On Your Other Social Media Accounts: Originally published Aug 11, 2011 9:00:00 AM, updated March 21 2013 , consider adding social media logos and corresponding URLs to your profile pages on these sites right onto your ads and promotional materials. This will encourage people who discover you offline to also connect with you online, making for a truly integrated campaign. Topics: 5. On Print Materials: Where else do you suggest promoting 3. In Your Emails: and social media should go hand in hand. Include small follow buttons or links in the footer of your email sends to encourage email recipients to connect with you in social media. If you are the owner of a brick and mortar business and are using print advertising or other materials to complement your These days, Social Media Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

Facebook Rolling Out Video Ads to News Feeds, and Other Marketing Stories of the Week

first_img Topics: Social Media Video You’ve heard the saying over and over again, but it still holds true: Content is king. Whether you’re creating a blog post, infographic, tweet, or even a PPC ad, creating content that people naturally want to consume will help you attract visitors, capture leads, and convert customers. This week, this saying held especially true in the world of inbound marketing. From Facebook’s new video advertising offering to Q&As with industry experts on Klout, this week’s roundup will fill you in on all things content-related on the web. Oh, and Happy Mother’s Day! ;-)Facebook Rolling Out Video Ads to News Feeds, From AdWeekOver the past few months, Facebook has been making some major moves with its social advertising platform. And the social network’s latest move doesn’t surprise us in the least: Facebook will be rolling out video ads in users’ News Feeds as soon as July. A few big brands including Ford, Coca-Cola, and American Express, are expected to participate in the first round of testing. For the time being, advertisers will only be allowed to choose among four different demographics to target.The 15-second ads will most likely appear to the side of the News Feed, on auto play, and muted by default with the option of unmuting. We’re still not sure yet if this new feature is good or bad news for marketers. While the new ad format opens up more opportunities to attract visitors and generate leads from Facebook, it could potentially alienate Facebook users. Many users complain that their News Feeds are already a bit cluttered with sponsored posts and pages — this new advertising format could add to the fray. That being said, it’s still too early to give the new ad format a yay or nay. Depending on how Facebook plans to moderate the number of ads per News Feed, these video ads could either turn the platform into an ad-filled mess or an effective ad-serving platform. Read more about Facebook’s video advertising options at Adweek.Google Launches YouTube Trends Map to Show the Most Popular Videos Across the U.S. in Real Time, From The Next WebAs you probably know by now, we love data — and the new Trends Map for YouTube melts our heart. Although it’s still in its infancy, the new Trends Map shows the most popular videos across the U.S., broken down by viewer age or gender. The map gives marketers a nice visual representation of how viral videos are shared and received across the country in real time. The videos that make it onto the map are chosen based on the number of shares by users, or total number of views. In addition to the map, marketers can also examine the popularity of particular videos based on certain demographics.For marketers, YouTube Trends Map is a great place to find relevant data on which videos go viral and why. Right now, the Trends Map only displays demographic information, but once there is more robust data available, it could be an incredibly powerful tool for marketers. Still, YouTube Trends Map can help marketers find engaging content to share with their followers, discover viral videos to newsjack, or even create a viral video of their own. Read more about YouTube Trends Map and what it means for marketers at The Next Web.YouTube Paid Subscription Channels Set to Launch Soon, From Marketing LandIt’s been a busy week for YouTube. Not only did the company recently release YouTube Trends Map, but it also started rolling out paid subscription channels offering premium video content. Besides providing a potential new revenue stream for YouTube, these paid subscription channels could attract a different type of audience who is concerned with the quality of the videos he or she watches rather than the quantity of videos available. The premium subscription is planned to compete with other premium video services such as Amazon, Hulu, and Netflix. With as many as 50 subscription-based channels at the time of launch and fees as low as $1.99 a month, this could be a great alternative revenue stream for YouTube.What marketers should know is that this new move will open up a number of advertising opportunities for companies looking to place ads in higher quality content. Even though its user-generated videos have been an effective way of serving ads, some marketers are looking to pay for TV–like quality. The new premium subscription channels could open up a whole new demographic of users for marketers to target with higher quality ads on higher quality videos. Read more about YouTube’s paid subscription channels at Marketing Land.Traditional Turned Inbound: Reimagining 5 Iconic Ad Campaigns From the Past, Free Ebook From HubSpotSometimes, it boggles our minds how much things in marketing have changed in the last 60 years. Some of the most iconic advertising campaigns happened before we had social media, precise ad targeting, or even the internet. Thinking back got us thinking — what would an iconic advertising campaign from the “Mad Men” era look like today? Based on advice from current marketing experts, our new ebook explores how today’s marketers could execute those iconic ad campaigns to get the same impact they had in past. Get ready for a dive into the history of marketing and advertising, and download the ebook today!Klout Gets Into the Q&A Business by Launching Klout Experts (With Help From Bing), From TechCrunchThe popular influence-measurement startup is launching a new program built around industry “expert” Q&As that influencers can use to boost their street cred. Klout is asking users who are influential about certain topics to answer questions in 300 characters or less, allowing Klout to enter into the content creation space. Klout will also be working closely with Microsoft to ensure that relevant answers to questions will appear in searches on Bing.Marketers should see this as the perfect opportunity to boost their SEO on Bing. The program isn’t open to all users just yet, but if you’re one of those influential marketers on Klout that happens to be asked a few questions, answer them, and let Bing do the rest of the work. This might be a great way to establish yourself as an industry thought leader and promote your social media presence through quality content. You may even increase the ranking of your other content online. Read more about Klout and what it means for inbound marketers at TechCrunch.What were some of the top marketing stories you heard about this week? Originally published May 12, 2013 9:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

How to Write Emails People Want to Respond To [SlideShare]

first_img Originally published Dec 4, 2013 4:00:00 PM, updated February 01 2017 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Email Templates This post originally appeared on Inbound Sales, a new section of Inbound Hub. To read more content like this, subscribe to the Sales section.Hi. My name is Michael Pici, and I thought I’d share some content around writing emails in order to … okay, I’ll stop right there. Does that opening honestly make you want to read this blog post any further? Probably not. That’s why it bewilders me that sales reps and marketers actually use this structure to contact their prospects.The purpose of a prospect email isn’t simply to send it — it’s to get a response too. That’s why I’d like to share my five-part sales email template for writing emails people actually want to respond to.I first presented this content through an Intelligent.ly class on writing awesome emails. The room was full of marketers, salespeople, small business owners, and others who simply want to see success through their email efforts. And since they shared how they found it valuable, we adapted the presentation into a SlideShare for others to check out as well, which you can check out below.center_img Topics: How to Write Emails People WANT to Respond to [Sales Template] from HubSpot All-in-one Marketing SoftwareOne of my favorite parts of presenting this to the Intelligent.ly class was hearing examples of how people are writing their emails using these best practices. Whether you attended or not, I’d love to hear example use cases below.Michael Pici is an inbound marketing and sales specialist at HubSpot. He was previously an account executive for Bouvier Insurance and Liberty Mutual. He also co-founded sellinbound.com where he shares modern sales best practices. To hear more from Michael, subscribe to our sales content here.last_img read more

30-Day Blog Challenge Tip #7: Don’t Do It Alone

first_img Topics: How to Write a Blog Post1. Understand your audience.Before you start to write your first blog post, have a clear understanding of your target audience. What do they want to know about? What will resonate with them? This is where creating your buyer personas comes in handy. Consider what you know about your buyer personas and their interests while you’re coming up with a topic for your blog post.For instance, if your readers are millennials looking to start their own business, you probably don’t need to provide them with information about getting started in social media — most of them already have that down. You might, however, want to give them information about how to adjust their approach to social media from a more casual, personal one to a more business-savvy, networking-focused approach. That kind of tweak is what separates you from blogging about generic stuff to the stuff your audience really wants (and needs) to hear.Don’t have buyer personas in place for your business? Here are a few resources to help you get started:Create Buyer Personas for Your Business [Free Template]Blog Post: How to Create Detailed Buyer Personas for Your BusinessMakeMyPersona.com [Free Tool] Hi 👋 What’s your name?First NameLast NameHi null, what’s your email address?Email AddressAnd your phone number?Phone NumberWhat is your company’s name and website?CompanyWebsiteHow many employees work there?1Does your company provide any of the following services?Web DesignOnline MarketingSEO/SEMAdvertising Agency ServicesYesNoGet Your Free Templates You’ve probably heard how paramount blogging is to the success of your marketing. But it’s important that you learn how to start a blog and write blog posts for it so that each article supports your business.Without a blog, your SEO can tank, you’ll have nothing to promote in social media, you’ll have no clout with your leads and customers, and you’ll have fewer pages to put those valuable calls-to-action that generate inbound leads.So why, oh why, does almost every marketer I talk to have a laundry list of excuses for why they can’t consistently blog?Maybe because, unless you’re one of the few people who actually like writing, business blogging kind of stinks. You have to find words, string them together into sentences … ugh, where do you even start?Download Now: 6 Free Blog Post TemplatesWell my friend, the time for excuses is over.What Is a Blog?A blog is literally short for “web log.” Blogs began in the early 1990s as an online journal for individuals to publish thoughts and stories on their own website. Bloggers then share their blog posts with other internet users. Blog posts used to be much more personal to the writer or group of writers than they are today.Today, people and organizations of all walks of life manage blogs to share analyses, instruction, criticisms, and other observations of an industry in which they are a rising expert.After you read this post, there will be absolutely no reason you can’t blog every single day — and do it quickly. Not only am I about to provide you with a simple blog post formula to follow, but I’m also going to give you free templates for creating five different types of blog posts:The How-To PostThe List-Based PostThe Curated Collection PostThe SlideShare Presentation PostThe Newsjacking PostWith all this blogging how-to, literally anyone can blog as long as they truly know the subject matter they’re writing about. And since you’re an expert in your industry, there’s no longer any reason you can’t sit down every day and hammer out an excellent blog post.Want to learn how to apply blogging and other forms of content marketing to your business? Check out HubSpot Academy’s free content marketing training resource page. Free Templates: 1. List-Based PostExample: 10 Fresh Ways to Get Better Results From Your Blog PostsList-based posts are sometimes called “listicles,” a mix of the words “list” and “article.” These are articles that deliver information in the form of a list. A listicle uses subheaders to break down the blog post into individual pieces, helping readers skim and digest your content more easily. According to ClearVoice, listicles are among the most shared types of content on social media across 14 industries.As you can see in the example from our blog, above, listicles can offer various tips and methods for solving a problem.2. Thought Leadership PostExample: What I Wish I Had Known Before Writing My First BookThought leadership blog posts allow you to indulge in your expertise on a particular subject matter and share firsthand knowledge with your readers. These pieces — which can be written in the first person, like the post by Joanna Penn, shown above — help you build trust with your audience so people take your blog seriously as you continue to write for it.3. Curated Collection PostExample: 8 Examples of Evolution in ActionCurated collections are a special type of listicle blog post (the first blog post example, described above). But rather than sharing tips or methods of doing something, this type of blog post shares a list of real examples that all have something in common, in order to prove a larger point. In the example post above, Listverse shares eight real examples of evolution in action among eight different animals — starting with the peppered moth.4. Slideshare PresentationExample: The HubSpot Culture CodeSlideshare is a presentation tool owned by the social network, LinkedIn, that helps publishers package a lot of information into easily shareable slides. Think of it like a PowerPoint, but for the web. With this in mind, Slideshare blog posts help you promote your Slideshare so that it can generate a steady stream of visitors.Unlike blogs, Slideshare decks don’t often rank well on search engines, so they need a platform for getting their message out there to the people who are looking for it. By embedding and summarizing your Slideshare on a blog post, you can share a great deal of information and give it a chance to rank on Google at the same time.Need some Slideshare ideas? In the example above, we turned our company’s “Culture Code” into a Slideshare presentation that anyone can look through and take lessons from, and promoted it through a blog post.5. Newsjacking PostExample: Ivy Goes Mobile With New App for Designers”Newsjacking” is a nickname for “hijacking” your blog to break important news related to your industry. Therefore, the newsjack post is a type of article whose sole purpose is to garner consumers’ attention and, while offering them timeless professional advice, also prove your blog to be a trusted resource for learning about the big things that happen in your industry.The newsjack example above was published by Houzz, a home decor merchant and interior design resource, about a new mobile app that launched just for interior designers. Houzz didn’t launch the app, but the news of its launching is no less important to Houzz’s audience.6. Infographic PostExample: The Key Benefits of Studying Online [Infographic]The infographic post serves a similar purpose as the Slideshare post — the fourth example, explained above — in that it conveys information for which plain blog copy might not be the best format. For example, when you’re looking to share a lot of statistical information (without boring or confusing your readers), building this data into a well-designed, even fun-looking infographic can help keep your readers engaged with your content. It also helps readers remember the information long after they leave your website.7. How-to PostExample: How to Write a Blog Post: A Step-by-Step GuideFor our last example, you need not look any further than the blog post you’re reading right now! How-to guides like this one help solve a problem for your readers. They’re like a cookbook for your industry, walking your audience through a project step by step to improve their literacy on the subject. The more posts like this you create, the more equipped your readers will be to work with you and invest in the services you offer.Ready to blog? Don’t forget to download your six free blog post templates right here. Free Blog Post Templatescenter_img Tell us a little about yourself below to gain access today: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Originally published May 6, 2019 7:30:00 PM, updated October 25 2019 How to Write a Blog Post 2. Create your blog domain.Next, you’ll need a place to host this and every other blog post you write. This requires choosing a content management system (CMS) and a website domain hosting service.Sign Up With a Content Management SystemA CMS helps you create a website domain where you’ll actually publish your blog. The CMS platforms available for you to sign up for can manage domains, where you create your own website; and subdomains, where you create a webpage that connects with an existing website.HubSpot customers host their website content through HubSpot’s content management system. Another popular option is a self-hosted WordPress website on WP Engine. Whether they create a domain or a subdomain to start their blog, they’ll need to choose a web domain hosting service after choosing their CMS.This is true for every blogger seeking to start their own blog on their own website.Register a Domain or Subdomain With a Website HostYour own blog domain will look like this: www.yourblog.com. The name between the two periods is up to you, as long as this domain name doesn’t yet exist on the internet.Want to create a subdomain for your blog? If you already own a cooking business at www.yourcompany.com, you might create a blog that looks like this: blog.yourcompany.com. In other words, your blog’s subdomain will live in its own section of yourcompany.com.Some CMSs offer subdomains as a free service, where your blog lives on the CMS, rather than your business’s website. For example, it might look like “yourblog.contentmanagementsystem.com.” However, in order to create a subdomain that belongs to a company website, you’ll need to register this subdomain with a website host.Most website hosting services charge very little to host an original domain — in fact, website costs can be as inexpensive as $3 per month. Here are five popular web hosting services to choose from:GoDaddyHostGatorDreamHostBluehostiPage3. Customize your blog’s theme.Once you have your blog domain set up, customize the appearance of your blog to reflect the theme of the content you plan on creating.Are you writing about sustainability and the environment? Green might be a color to keep in mind when designing the look and feel of your blog, as green is often associated with sustainability.If you already manage a website, and are writing your first blog post for that website, it’s important that your blog is consistent with this existing website, both in appearance and subject matter. Two things to include right away are:Logo. This can be your name or your business’s logo, either one helping to remind your readers who or what is publishing this content. How heavily you want to brand this blog, in relation to your main brand, is up to you.”About” page. You might already have an “About” blurb describing yourself or your business. Your blog’s “About” section is an extension of this higher-level statement. Think of it as your blog’s mission statement, which serves to support your company’s goals.4. Identify your first blog post’s topic.Before you even write anything, you need to pick a topic for your blog post. The topic can be pretty general to start with. For example, if you’re a plumber, you might start out thinking you want to write about leaky faucets.Then, as you do your research, you can expand the topic to discuss how to fix a leaky faucet based on the various causes of a faucet leak.You might not want to jump right into a “how-to” article for your first blog post, though, and that’s okay. Perhaps you’d like to write about modern types of faucet setups, or tell one particular success story you had rescuing a faucet before it flooded someone’s house.If a plumber’s first how-to article is about how to fix a leaky faucet, for example, here are four other types of sample blog post ideas a plumber might start with, based on the five free blog templates we’ve offered to you:List-based Post: 5 ways to fix a leaky faucetCurated Collection Post: 10 faucet and sink brands you should look into todaySlideShare Presentation: 5 types of faucets that should replace your old one (with pictures)News post: New study shows X% of people don’t replace their faucet on timeFind more examples of blog posts at the end of this step-by-step guide.If you’re having trouble coming up with topic ideas, check out this blog post from my colleague Ginny Soskey. In this post, Soskey walks through a helpful process for turning one idea into many. Similar to the “leaky faucet” examples above, she suggests that you “iterate off old topics to come up with unique and compelling new topics.” This can be done by:Changing the topic scopeAdjusting the time frameChoosing a new audienceTaking a positive/negative approachIntroducing a new format5. Come up with a working title.Then you might come up with a few different working titles — in other words, iterations or different ways of approaching that topic to help you focus your writing. For example, you might decide to narrow your topic to “Tools for Fixing Leaky Faucets” or “Common Causes of Leaky Faucets.” A working title is specific and will guide your post so you can start writing.Let’s take a real post as an example: “How to Choose a Solid Topic for Your Next Blog Post.” Appropriate, right? The topic, in this case, was probably simply “blogging.” Then the working title may have been something like, “The Process for Selecting a Blog Post Topic.” And the final title ended up being “How to Choose a Solid Topic for Your Next Blog Post.”See that evolution from topic, to working title, to final title? Even though the working title may not end up being the final title (more on that in a moment), it still provides enough information so you can focus your blog post on something more specific than a generic, overwhelming topic.6. Write an intro (and make it captivating).We’ve written more specifically about writing captivating introductions in the post, “How to Write an Introduction,” but let’s review, shall we?First, grab the reader’s attention. If you lose the reader in the first few paragraphs — or even sentences — of the introduction, they will stop reading even before they’ve given your post a fair shake. You can do this in a number of ways: tell a story or a joke, be empathetic, or grip the reader with an interesting fact or statistic.Then describe the purpose of the post and explain how it will address a problem the reader may be having. This will give the reader a reason to keep reading and give them a connection to how it will help them improve their work/lives. Here’s an example of a post that we think does a good job of attracting a reader’s attention right away:7. Organize your content in an outline.Sometimes, blog posts can have an overwhelming amount of information — for the reader and the writer. The trick is to organize the info so readers are not intimidated by the length or amount of content. The organization can take multiple forms — sections, lists, tips, whatever’s most appropriate. But it must be organized!Let’s take a look at the post, “How to Use Snapchat: A Detailed Look Into HubSpot’s Snapchat Strategy.” There is a lot of content in this post, so we broke it into a few different sections using the following headers: How to Setup Your Snapchat Account, Snaps vs. Stories: What’s the Difference?, and How to Use Snapchat for Business. These sections are then separated into sub-sections that to go into more detail and also make the content easier to read.To complete this step, all you really need to do is outline your post. That way, before you start writing, you know which points you want to cover, and the best order in which to do it. To make things even easier, you can also download and use our free blog post templates, which are pre-organized for five of the most common blog post types. Just fill in the blanks!8. Write your blog post!The next step — but not the last — is actually writing the content. We couldn’t forget about that, of course.Now that you have your outline/template, you’re ready to fill in the blanks. Use your outline as a guide and be sure to expand on all of your points as needed. Write about what you already know, and if necessary, do additional research to gather more information, examples, and data to back up your points, providing proper attribution when incorporating external sources. Need help finding accurate and compelling data to use in your post? Check out this roundup of sources — from Pew Research to Google Trends.If you find you’re having trouble stringing sentences together, you’re not alone. Finding your “flow” can be really challenging for a lot of folks. Luckily, there are a ton of tools you can lean on to help you improve your writing. Here are a few to get you started:Power Thesaurus: Stuck on a word? Power Thesaurus is a crowdsourced tool that provides users with a ton of alternative word choices from a community of writers.ZenPen: If you’re having trouble staying focused, check out this distraction-free writing tool. ZenPen creates a minimalist “writing zone” that’s designed to help you get words down without having to fuss with formatting right away.Cliché Finder: Feeling like your writing might be coming off a little cheesy? Identify instances where you can be more specific using this handy cliché tool.For a complete list of tools for improving your writing skills, check out this post. And if you’re looking for more direction, the following resources are chock-full of valuable writing advice:The Marketer’s Pocket Guide to Writing Well [Free Ebook]How to Write Compelling Copy: 7 Tips for Writing Content That ConvertsHow to Write With Clarity: 9 Tips for Simplifying Your MessageThe Kurt Vonnegut Guide to Great Copywriting: 8 Rules That Apply to AnyoneYour Blog Posts Are Boring: 9 Tips for Making Your Writing More InterestingThe Beginner’s Guide to Starting a Successful Blog in 20199. Edit/proofread your post, and fix your formatting.You’re not quite done yet, but you’re close! The editing process is an important part of blogging — don’t overlook it. Ask a grammar-conscious co-worker to copy, edit, and proofread your post, and consider enlisting the help of The Ultimate Editing Checklist (or try using a free grammar checker, like the one developed by Grammarly). And if you’re looking to brush up on your own self-editing skills, turn to these helpful posts for some tips and tricks to get you started:Confessions of a HubSpot Editor: 11 Editing Tips From the TrenchesHow to Become a More Efficient Editor: 12 Ways to Speed Up the Editorial Process10 Simple Edits That’ll Instantly Improve Any Piece of WritingWhen you’re ready to check your formatting, keep the following advice in mind …Featured ImageMake sure you choose a visually appealing and relevant image for your post. As social networks treat content with images more prominently, visuals are now more responsible than ever for the success of your blog content in social media. In fact, it’s been shown that content with relevant images receives 94% more views than content without relevant images.For help selecting an image for your post, read “How to Select the Perfect Image for Your Next Blog Post” — and pay close attention to the section about copyright law.Visual AppearanceNo one likes an ugly blog post. And it’s not just pictures that make a post visually appealing — it’s the formatting and organization of the post, too.In a properly formatted and visually appealing blog post, you’ll notice that header and sub-headers are used to break up large blocks of text — and those headers are styled consistently. Here’s an example of what that looks like:Also, screenshots should always have a similar, defined border (see screenshot above for example) so they don’t appear as if they’re floating in space. And that style should stay consistent from post to post.Maintaining this consistency makes your content (and your brand) look more professional, and makes it easier on the eyes.Topics/TagsTags are specific, public-facing keywords that describe a post. They also allow readers to browse for more content in the same category on your blog. Refrain from adding a laundry list of tags to each post. Instead, put some thought into a tagging strategy. Think of tags as “topics” or “categories,” and choose 10-20 tags that represent all the main topics you want to cover on your blog. Then stick to those.10. Insert a call-to-action (CTA) at the end.At the end of every blog post, you should have a CTA that indicates what you want the reader to do next — subscribe to your blog, download an ebook, register for a webinar or event, read a related article, etc. Typically, you think about the CTA being beneficial for the marketer. Your visitors read your blog post, they click on the CTA, and eventually you generate a lead. But the CTA is also a valuable resource for the person reading your content — use your CTAs to offer more content similar to the subject of the post they just finished reading.In the blog post, “What to Post on Instagram: 18 Photo & Video Ideas to Spark Inspiration,” for instance, readers are given actionable ideas for creating valuable Instagram content. At the end of the post is a CTA referring readers to download a comprehensive guide on how to use Instagram for business:See how that’s a win-win for everyone? Readers who want to learn more have the opportunity to do so, and the business receives a lead they can nurture … who may even become a customer! Learn more about how to choose the right CTA for every blog post in this article. And check out this collection of clever CTAs to inspire your own efforts.11. Optimize for on-page SEO.After you finish writing, go back and optimize your post for search.Don’t obsess over how many keywords to include. If there are opportunities to incorporate keywords you’re targeting, and it won’t impact reader experience, do it. If you can make your URL shorter and more keyword-friendly, go for it. But don’t cram keywords or shoot for some arbitrary keyword density — Google’s smarter than that!Here’s a little reminder of what you can and should look for:Meta DescriptionMeta descriptions are the descriptions below the post’s page title on Google’s search results pages. They provide searchers with a short summary of the post before clicking into it. They are ideally between 150-160 characters and start with a verb, such as “Learn,” “Read,” or “Discover.” While meta descriptions no longer factor into Google’s keyword ranking algorithm, they do give searchers a snapshot of what they will get by reading the post and can help improve your clickthrough rate from search.Page Title and HeadersMost blogging software uses your post title as your page title, which is the most important on-page SEO element at your disposal. But if you’ve followed our formula so far, you should already have a working title that will naturally include keywords/phrases your target audience is interested in. Don’t over-complicate your title by trying to fit keywords where they don’t naturally belong. That said, if there are clear opportunities to add keywords you’re targeting to your post title and headers, feel free to take them. Also, try to keep your headlines short — ideally, under 65 characters — so they don’t get truncated in search engine results.Anchor TextAnchor text is the word or words that link to another page — either on your website or on another website. Carefully select which keywords you want to link to other pages on your site, because search engines take that into consideration when ranking your page for certain keywords.It’s also important to consider which pages you link to. Consider linking to pages that you want to rank well for that keyword. You could end up getting it to rank on Google’s first page of results instead of its second page, and that ain’t small potatoes.Mobile OptimizationWith mobile devices now accounting for nearly 2 out of every 3 minutes spent online, having a website that is responsive or designed for mobile has become more and more critical. In addition to making sure your website’s visitors (including your blog’s visitors) have the best experience possible, optimizing for mobile will score your website some SEO points.Back in 2015, Google made a change to its algorithm that now penalizes sites that aren’t mobile optimized. This month (May 2016), Google rolled out their second version of the mobile-friendly algorithm update — creating a sense of urgency for the folks that have yet to update their websites. To make sure your site is getting the maximum SEO benefit possible, check out this free guide: How to Make a Mobile-Friendly Website: SEO Tips for a Post-“Mobilegeddon” World.12. Pick a catchy title.Last but not least, it’s time to spruce up that working title of yours. Luckily, we have a simple formula for writing catchy titles that will grab the attention of your reader. Here’s what to consider:Start with your working title.As you start to edit your title, keep in mind that it’s important to keep the title accurate and clear.Then, work on making your title sexy — whether it’s through strong language, alliteration, or another literary tactic.If you can, optimize for SEO by sneaking some keywords in there (only if it’s natural, though!).Finally, see if you can shorten it at all. No one likes a long, overwhelming title — and remember, Google prefers 65 characters or fewer before it truncates it on its search engine results pages.If you’ve mastered the steps above, learn about some way to take your blog posts to the next level in this post. Want some real examples of blog posts? See what your first blog post can look like, below, based on the topic you choose and the audience you’re targeting.Blog Post ExamplesList-Based PostThought Leadership PostCurated Collection PostSlideshare PresentationNewsjacking PostInfographic PostHow-to Postlast_img read more

How SMBs Use Twitter: 15 Stats You Should Know

first_img Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Social Media Marketing Small- and medium-sized businesses are turning to social media to generate leads and customers. In fact, in 2013, 36% of SMBs attracted a customer from their Twitter marketing campaigns. As more and more companies look to Twitter to generate site traffic and customers, the interactions on Twitter become more meaningful to customers and companies alike.Twitter recently launched a study of 1,000 people living in the United States who use Twitter monthly, and follow SMBs on Twitter, to determine how businesses interact with their followers. I have highlighted some of the best takeaways from their report to help give you both an understanding of how SMBs are using Twitter, as well as how they’re interacting with their followers. To view the full report, check it out on Twitter’s website. How SMBs Are Using Twitter in 20141) 51% of SMBs use Twitter daily. (Tweet This Stat.)2) 73% of people said they feel more confident in an SMB after following them and reading some of their Tweets. (Tweet This Stat.)3) 57% of people have discovered a new SMB on Twitter. (Tweet This Stat.)4) The top way people found a new SMB is in the “Who to Follow” recommendations on the left, followed by a friend tweeting about the SMB. (Tweet This Stat.)5) 32% of people found a new SMB from a promoted tweet from the SMB. (Tweet This Stat.)6) 40% of people who follow SMBs do so because they want to learn about new products. (Tweet This Stat.)7) 2/3 of people have retweeted a tweet from an SMB. (Tweet This Stat.)8) 81% of people who follow an SMB are more likely to take an action after seeing something on Twitter than any other marketing channel — including visiting their website, getting an email, and getting direct mail. (Tweet This Stat.)9) 9 out of 10 people have engaged in a conversion with or about an SMB on Twitter. (Tweet This Stat.)10) 76% of people have tweeted directly to an SMB. (Tweet This Stat.)11) 90% of those who got a reply from an SMB felt better about the company. (Tweet This Stat.)12) Of the people who notice promoted accounts on Twitter, 2 out of 3 started following an SMB because of it. (Tweet This Stat.)13) 48% of people who have noticed a promoted tweet have clicked through the link in the tweet. (23% end up purchasing something!) (Tweet This Stat.)14) 85% of followers feel more connected to an SMB after following them. (Tweet This Stat.)15) The most common reason someone tweets at an SMB is to share a positive experience they had. (Tweet This Stat.) Originally published Mar 13, 2014 11:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017last_img read more

11 Things You Didn’t Know You Were Doing Wrong on Twitter

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Are you trying to amass a large following on Twitter? Want to increase your engagement and have meaningful conversations? Or maybe even drive more traffic to your website?These are great goals to set for yourself, but there are some mistakes you might be making on Twitter that are likely hindering your efforts, and you’re not even aware of it.Making some of these mistakes might even lead to people UNFOLLOWING you. *Collective gasp of horror.*Here are eleven things you didn’t know you were doing wrong on Twitter — some of which may be why people are unfollowing you:Click here to access a free Twitter for Businesses kit.1) Tweeting Purely Self-Promotional ContentThere’s a lot of interesting content out there. Chances are, your followers are interested in more than just yours. And if all you do is tweet content about yourself, you’re going to bore your audience pretty quickly — especially if you tweet the same link over and over. It will be hard to grow a valuable following if you don’t share other unique content, retweet, and reply to others.2) Tweeting at People With Irrelevant LinksYou might think your latest blog post is the most brilliant article to be posted on the internet all month. Maybe it is. But it’s generally a bad idea to tweet at people using their @ handles with a link to your article. If there is a specific person you know would be interested in your content based on previous conversations you’ve had with them, that’s one thing. But to @ every person you follow in your industry and your city with a link will get you unfollowed faster than you can say “spam.”3) Retweeting Every Tweet That Mentions YouIf people are mentioning you and your content in their tweets, that’s great! You can thank them by replying to them or favoriting their tweets. But retweeting every tweet in which you’re mentioned makes you look like you’re trying to win a popularity contest. Just like blasting out self-promotional tweets, it will clutter your followers’ feeds with tweets about … you.4) Keeping Your Twitter Lists HiddenMost of the people I keep track of on Twitter are not people I follow — they’re people I’ve organized into various lists. In fact, sometimes when people follow me, I add them to a list instead of following them back, since I pay attention to lists more than my main Twitter stream. When you create a list on Twitter, you can choose to create a public or private list.Public list: Anyone you add to the list will receive a notification that you’ve added them to that list. Anyone can also find and follow your list, or add your list to their Tweetdeck as a column.Private list: It’s private to you. Nobody on that list will know that you’re following them. Nobody can find or follow the list you’ve curated.Some lists should remain private, e.g. lists you’ve created for groups of friends and/or family. But if you’ve created an industry or professional-related list, consider making it public. That way the people included in your lists may reciprocate or follow you, or not get offended that you didn’t “follow” them back, since they know you’re paying attention to them.5) Favoriting Every Tweet Someone TweetsYou don’t want people to think you’re a stalker, do you?It’s fine to be a super fan. There are certain people on Twitter that you admire and like to follow closely, and that’s great. Much like the “Like” button on Facebook, favoriting is an easy way to show appreciation for shared content on Twitter. But if you favorite every single tweet someone puts out there, they will notice — and not always in a good way. Worse yet, some people favorite every tweet someone is even mentioned in.I think sometimes people use software to automatically favorite these tweets, but either way, it’s super creepy and can get you unfollowed or even blocked.6) Griping or Complaining I am guilty of this sometimes. When I get frustrated about something, it’s easy to tweet out a short rant and feel like I’ve gotten something off my chest.Publicly spewing negativity is a bad idea. While there are some very nice people out there who will tweet at me with pictures of kittens and puppies, my follower count takes a small dip each time I rant about something. People don’t like to be surrounded by negative people. So try to avoid airing out your dirty laundry on Twitter and maintain a positive outlook — your followers will love you for it.7) Tweeting All Your Content for the Day at OnceYou might not have much time for Twitter. In fact, Twitter (and other social media responsibilities) might be your “morning coffee” activity, which means you spend 15 minutes responding to tweets, publishing new tweets, and sharing interesting content. But don’t forget to space things out! If you tweet five times in a row first thing in the morning, and that’s it for the day, your tweets will only be seen by people who happen to check Twitter around that time. Your tweets will be pushed too far down the stream for the afternoon crowd to see. You can use tools like Social Inbox to schedule your tweets throughout the day. This way, you can still get your Twitter tasks out of the way in the morning, but your account will be active throughout the day.8) OversharingThere are certain mundane details of your life that your Twitter followers probably don’t want to know about, including but not limited to problems you’re having with your wilted lettuce, how uncooperative your children are being in the grocery store, or how many hours of sleep you got last night. #nobodycaresSometimes it’s fine to share this kind of day-to-day life drama — it adds to your personality, makes you more relatable, and lets you connect with your audience. But if you only tweet this stuff … all the time … you won’t become a very influential person on Twitter (unless you’re already a celebrity). Oversharing could also mean tweeting too frequently. If you overwhelm your followers’ Twitter streams, they likely won’t follow you for long.9) Auto DMsThere are some services you can use to automatically send a direct message (DM) to a new follower. Sadly, some people still think using these services is a good idea. Upon polling Twitter to ask why people would unfollow someone, auto DM was the #1 most common response. Auto DMs are annoying, inauthentic, and make you seem like a bot or spammer.10) Being Rude to Other Twitter UsersI will never understand why people go out of their way to be mean or rude to strangers on Twitter, but it happens all the time. Maybe you’ve read articles saying the best way to gain a following is to be controversial. Or maybe you don’t realize you’re being rude.A good rule of thumb to follow: If you wouldn’t say something to someone’s face in real life, you shouldn’t say it to them on Twitter. The same etiquette should apply. For the most part, Twitter isn’t really anonymous. The people you’re rude to can see who you are. So for goodness sake, behave!11) Only RetweetingIf you like to retweet often, that’s great! You’re not being overly-self-promotional, and you’re contributing to the conversation. But there is the opposite extreme as well, and that’s ONLY retweeting other people’s tweets, especially if you don’t provide commentary of your own. If you want to be influential on Twitter, you need to contribute some original content, as well. Otherwise your followers might as well only follow the people you retweet, and not follow you.Want to share this post? Here are some ready-made tweets:Click to tweet: 11 Things You Didn’t Know You Were Doing Wrong On Twitter – http://hub.am/1hnPg3S by @DianaUrban at @HubSpotClick to tweet: 11 Things You Didn’t Know You Were Doing Wrong On Twitter – http://hub.am/1hnPg3S http://pic.twitter.com/wvx3f86dgvClick to tweet: Here are 11 things you might be doing wrong on Twitter… are you guilty of any? http://hub.am/1hnPg3SImage source: TweetBrander. Topics: Originally published Mar 27, 2014 8:11:00 AM, updated July 28 2017 Twitter Marketinglast_img read more

5 Tips to Punch Up Your Product Descriptions

first_img Product Marketing Topics: Pictures of products are great for showing customers what they’re considering giving you hard-earned money for. Still, a picture can’t tell the whole story. Sometimes only words can do that. If you’re skating by with minimal product descriptions, you may be earning minimal profits. Here are a few hints to help you boost your bottom line.Download Now: Free Product Marketing KitConsider Your BuyersWhat do your buyers find most important? Will they be more likely to buy if you focus on the status they’ll acquire when they purchase your products, or are they more pragmatic? Is a fun and quippy product description going to catch their eyes, or do they prefer just the facts? If you write with your buyer personas in mind, you’re more likely to reel them in.Write Something… AnythingSure, the manufacturer provides a succinct product description, complete with product numbers, sizes, colors, and other pertinent details. A lot of ecommerce companies only post that, to their detriment. Keep in mind that other online stores may work with the same manufacturers, which means they might post the exact same descriptions. You should augment the description, instead of simply posting what’s provided. Tell a StoryWhether that story is a few simple words or a couple of paragraphs, your buyers want to read it. They want to picture themselves with that product, enjoy the benefits and the stares of envy. And you? You want to make sure every word you write supports your brand and continues to share your vision. A story is the only way to connect with your buyers.Get DetailedKeep in mind that people may search for specific items by various terms, including product numbers, colors, sizes, and even materials used in production. You should share any and all information within your product descriptions, and consider sharing that information again in another tab. The story is important, but so are the minute details.Avoid FluffIt’s not easy to tell a story without putting in all sorts of frilly language, but you must resist. If you include information that can’t be substantiated, such as “exceptional quality,” your buyers will not be persuaded. Instead, focus on things that you can back up with facts. Describe the features and then explain the benefits. Let the customer decide if the product is of exceptional quality. If he or she deems it so, your other buyers will find out through reviews from past customers. Those words hold so much more weight than yours do.Product descriptions are one more chance for you to soothe your buyers’ pain points—to let them know exactly why they need the items you’re selling. If you miss this chance to convince them to buy, you may never get another. That’s why it’s so important to give everything you have to creating copy that focuses on converting those visitors into paying customers.Which ecommerce companies really kill it with product descriptions? We’d love to know who your favorites are. Originally published Oct 8, 2015 7:00:00 AM, updated June 19 2019 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more