This suburb is attracting buyers because of its strong sporting credentials

first_img16 Flower St, Woolloongabba. Picture: realestate.com.auThe living and dining areas flow out to a large rear deck, which overlooks the garden. A renovated bathroom has a large combined bath and shower.Both of the bedrooms have built-in wardrobes and the front room would operate well as an office.For investors, the property has a good rental history of long-term tenants.It is two blocks from the South City development which, upon completion, will include a full-sized supermarket, cafes and restaurants. 27 Henry St, Woolloongabba. Picture: realestate.com.auThe three-bedroom home is listed through Will Torres, of Place – Coorparoo.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home5 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor5 hours agoThe house is on 405sq m and has the potential for renovation or redevelopment subject to council approval. It is a short walk from Logan and Ipswich roads. The post-war home has original VJ walls, timber flooring and exterior fretwork. Two of the bedrooms are airconditioned and there is a central bathroom.The kitchen is open plan and next to a dining and living area, from which the front deck can be accessed.Meanwhile, another home close to all of the sporting action is the renovated two-bedroom home at 16 Flower St, Woolloongabba.It is listed, seeking best offers of more than $615,000, through Kellie O’Connor, of O’Connor Realty. Love  your sport? Reckon living within walking distance of one of Brisbane’s major sporting stadiums sounds like a dream come true?If you answer yes to any of these questions, then Woolloongabba is for you. The suburb, about 3km from the Brisbane CBD, is home to the famous Gabba stadium.If you want to live not far from all the AFL or cricket action, the property at 20 Vanda St is listed for buyers of more than $1.18 million.The five-bedroom, triple-gable Queenslander is fully self-contained on both levels, with kitchens, living areas and entertainment spaces.Upstairs is a more traditional Queenslander style, with two bedrooms and a third bedroom in the sleepout. Downstairs is more modern, with three bedrooms, an open-plan living area and a kitchen overlooking the fenced yard. The property has a swimming pool and a wooden garage that has been converted for storage. There is also a Queenslander-style cubby house.Also not a long walk from the stadium is 27 Henry St, Woolloongabba, which is scheduled for auction on May 20.last_img read more

Wellington girls hit 13 3-pointers in 65-38 victory over Andale, Duke boys lose

first_img10 Andale 14 65 17 6 13 21 18 38 13 Andale boys 58 Wellington 45 Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. There are no comments posted yet. Be the first one! Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Andale: Dagenars 6, Cothran 3, Meyer 5, Carney 13, Walstad 11, Bruce 5, Ast 14. Total 10 (7) 17-25 58 18 Follow us on Twitter. 13 4center_img Wellington girls 65 Andale 38 16 Andale: Hopper 2, Easter 4, Eck 4, Bergkamp 6, Dreiling 12, Winter 2, Chavez 2, Walther 2. Total: 17 (0) 4-10 38 8 16 Wellington Connor Phelps brings ball downcourt against Andale.by Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — The 3-pointers came raining down in Crusader gymnasium as the second-ranked Wellington girls beat Andale 65-38 Friday evening.The boys lost to Andale 58-45 in the nightcap.A huge homecoming crowd was on hand to view the festivities that eventually ended with Julian Cornejo crowned the Duke of Wellington.Fresh off a scare against Winfield Tuesday, the Wellington girls had little trouble disposing of their Ark Valley Chisholm Trail League Div. IV rival as the second rotation of league play began. Wellington is now 6-0 in league and 16-0 overall.Wellington tied a school record by hitting 13 3-pointers as five girls contributed to the cause. Both Grace Mitchell and Avery Rusk knocked down four of them, while Lauryn Snipes and MeKenna Adams had two apiece. Even freshman Jacelyn Buck got in the act, nailing a three late in the fourth quarter on a running clock.Going into this contest, there was some uncertainty, even though Wellington had beaten this same team 59-43 at its place in December. Andale had earlier beat Winfield 46-32.The game started slowly, but Wellington went on a nice run at quarter’s end to lead 13-6. In the second quarter, for the first time since Augusta, Wellington found its offensive grooved the 3-pointers started to come. Fellow sophomores Rusk and Adams took turns hitting treys. By halftime, Wellington led 31-19 at the half.“They were throwing a lot of junk defenses on us, triangle-and-two, box-and-ones,” Adams said. “We did a good job tonight shaking that off.”Mitchell had only three points at halftime, victim of those defenses built to stifle her. But by the third quarter, when it was apparent Andale wasn’t stopping the other girls,  the Indians went into standard defensive sets. Mitchell then returned to form and would eventually score 18 of the game.But this night belonged to Rusk, who had 19.“Coach told us in practice that he thought Andale could beat us,” Rusk said. “It made us mad so we went out there to prove him wrong.”Wellington will host Mulvane Tuesday before traveling to Wichita Collegiate next Friday. 45 ————The Wellington boys have always played Andale tougher the second time around.When the Crusaders traveled to Andale in December, the Indians won 63-26. Andale would go on an 18-0 run in the first quarter to coast to victory.Andale got off to a similar start Friday night, taking a 16-4 lead into the second quarter. The difference this time Wellington would never let the Indians expand on its lead thereafter.Too bad there wasn’t a fifth quarter for this game. A.J. Snipes seemed to be just warming up. He scored 25 points for the game, but he had 2 in first, 4 in the second, 8 in the third and 11 in the fourth – including three 3-pointers.Wellington could never shave the lead into single digits, but it was clear it was outplaying Andale down the stretch – outscoring the Indians 17-16 in the fourth.The Crusaders are back at .500 at 8-8 and hosts Mulvane Tuesday. Andale 58 Wellington: Snipes 15, S. French 4, Rusk 19, Adams 6, Buck 3, Mitchell 18. Total: 9 (13) 8-12 65. Wellington 6 Wellington: Ca. Phelps 2, Co. Phelps 4, Frame 5, Snipes 25, King 9, Total 10 (4) 13-20 45 13last_img read more

Obua takes over lango province ahead of FUFA drum kick off

first_imgWhereas Obua’s arrival is considered a big boost to the team, Moi says they are aware that their encounter with Buganda Province won’t be an easy match since they will be facing defending champions.Geoffrey Omara, the chairman Fans Association for Lango Province, says they have embarked on a fundraising drive to secure sufficient funds for the team.About 16 provinces have been created and confirmed to participate in the second edition of the FUFA drum tournament.******URNShare on: WhatsApp FUFA Drum competitions participating provinces. PHOTO via @OfficialFUFAKampala, Uganda | THE INDEPENDENT | The former Uganda Cranes striker, David Obua has pitched camp in Lira town to coach the Lango Province team a head of the FUFA drum kick off this week.Obua, who arrived on Tuesday afternoon, is overseeing the training of more than 40 players who have camped at Uganda Martyrs University, Ngetta Campus. His arrival triggered excitement among team members who have been undergoing drills ahead of their tie with Buganda Province at Bishop SS in Mukono district this weekend.Shortly after his arrival in Lira Town, Obua appeared on major radio stations to drum support for the Lango Province team and promised better performance in the second edition of FUFA Drum competitions, which started two weeks ago.Obua said he was in Lira for good performance, saying Lango region is known for producing good players and athletes and assured soccer fans of clean results. He urged them to support the team so as to deliver credible performance.Daniel Moi, the Spokesperson Lango Province is optimistic that the arrival of Obua combined with a number of senior players like KCCA’s Allan Okello among others; they are destined for victory in their first match against Buganda Province in Mukono this weekend.last_img read more

Some colleges tell players not to sign autographs

first_imgIn this April 1, 2014, file photo, Florida State quarterback and 2013 Heisman Trophy winner Jameis Winston autographs a program from the BCS National Championship for Michelle Reilly in the Capitol Courtyard in Tallahassee, Fla. (AP Photo/Phil Sears, File)Mississippi State star Dak Prescott says he is taking steps to avoid being the next college football star to be accused of exchanging autographs for cash.“I’ve started just personalizing things — making sure I write to the person that they’re asking for. And I don’t sign things in bundles — just being a lot more aware of what I’m signing,” the Heisman Trophy contender said.Personalizing an autographed item lowers its value.Good idea, but still a simple Google search of ‘Dak Prescott autograph’ generates about a dozen images of photographs, mini-helmets and footballs for sale with Prescott’s signature on them. Or at least a signature the seller claims to be Prescott’s. Prices range for $20 for an 8×10 print to $200 for that mini-helmet, which would otherwise go for about $30.Somebody is making a nice profit off this stuff.From left are file photos showing college football players Braxton Miller, Ohio State; Bryce Petty, Baylor; Nick Marshall, Auburn; Myles Jack, UCLA; Marcus Mariota, Oregon and Todd Gurley, Georgia. Six players that have a chance of taking home the Heisman trophy. (AP Photo/File)A year after Johnny Manziel was suspended for a half after an investigation by Texas A&M and the NCAA into whether he was paid to sign memorabilia, Georgia’s Todd Gurley is being investigated for the same thing. The star running back has already missed one game, and it’s unclear if he’ll return.The quantity of signatures from Heisman winner Jameis Winston  — many authenticated by the same company linked to Gurley — has forced Florida State coach Jimbo Fisher to field questions about whether his two-sport star has done anything wrong.“He’s never taken a dime for anything,” Fisher said earlier this week. “He’s signed thousands of things. I mean, the guy sits for an hour and a half before a baseball game and signed and an hour and a half after a baseball game. … He is very accommodating to people.”In some cases, schools have encouraged their players to be less accommodating.Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel reacts after being selected by the Cleveland Browns as the 22nd pick in the first round of the 2014 NFL Draft, Thursday, May 8, 2014, in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)Arizona wide receiver Austin Hill said coach Rich Rodriguez has made the team cut back on the impromptu autograph sessions after games.“I think our media staff and everyone we have now controls it a little better than what we had in the past, because in the past there used to be people around McKale (Center) just with pieces of paper, with footballs, with random things, trying to get us to sign,” he said. “To be nice, we used to sign them. But since Coach Rod got here, it hasn’t been too much of a problem.”Of course, sometimes the school asks him to sign material.“I had to sign a couple of footballs for some big donors, things like that,” Hill said.Former Louisville player Calvin Pryor, now with the New York Jets, said he didn’t get asked to do much signing in college but saw plenty of demand for teammate Teddy Bridgewater, the record-breaking quarterback who is now with the Minnesota Vikings.Pryor, who played under coach Charlie Strong, now with Texas, said Louisville coaches had a very clear policy: Do not give any autographs, and that the staff monitored it closely.He said the message was: “Better be safe than sorry, because we don’t want you to get suspended or having to go through the NCAA. They just kept us away from it.”That meant occasionally disappointing fans, though Louisville would hold formal sessions that gave fans access to players. Pryor said those took the pressure off the biggest stars.“I think that’s a smarter way to do it,” he said.South Carolina receiver Pharoh Cooper said there are no rules against signing away from school-sponsored events, but the Gamecocks are drilled on the rules by compliance staff and coaches and told to be wary.“They just ask us to be careful about it, about what we sign and how many items,” he said. “But sometimes, they’ll tell you to personalize it. People are going to try and get money off your name and sell it, so you’ve just really got to be smart about what you do.”Those school sponsored autograph sessions can be part of the problem, though. They produce hundreds of signed items that nobody is tracking.“It’s always a concern of ours any time that there’s an issue in college football that’s very, very difficult to control externally,” Alabama coach Nick Saban said. “We are very vigilant with our process of how we counsel players, teach players. Our compliance people try to do the best possible job that we can so that we don’t have those issues. There’s a lot of folks out there that are trying to do these types of things for their own personal benefit, and the player is the one that’s going to suffer the consequences if he doesn’t make a good choice and decision.”___AP sports writers Rachel Cohen in Florham Park, New Jersey, Pete Iacobelli in Columbia, South Carolina, David Brandt in Starkville, Mississippi, and John Zenor in Montgomery, Alabama, contributed.___Follow Ralph D. Russo at www.Twitter.com/ralphDrussoAPlast_img read more

Mentoring One Child at a Time, Over Time

first_img“Justin changed my life,” D.J. said about his mentor, who is the most important male role model in his world. “I don’t think I would be here without him.”January is National Mentoring Month. Groups like Big Brothers Big Sisters of Monmouth & Middlesex Counties are hoping to bring attention to use the moment to recruit more “big siblings,” especially men, to make a positive difference in a young person’s life.“Everyone has had a mentor in life,” said Marybeth Bull, a resident of Fair Haven who is also director of development at Big Brothers Big Sisters of Monmouth & Middlesex Counties (BBBS). “Whether it was a family member, or a boss, somebody in their life who has been there for them and showed them the way and been a positive person in their life.”You don’t need special skills. “You just have to be willing to share time with a child that needs a positive person in their life,” Bull said.Adults 19 years or older who can commit to spend four to six hours a month for at least a year, are great candidates for the volunteer position, she said.“To be a friend, spend time, be an ear for them, be a shoulder for them,” she said. “To point them in the right direction.”Headquartered in Asbury Park, BBBS currently serves 700 children in its program across Monmouth and Middlesex counties.“Littles” – who range in age from 6 to 15 years old – usually join the program at school and may be referred by guidance counselors and other social organizations. They are often from single parent households. The BBBS typically provides girls with a female mentor and boys with a male mentor. Bull said a woman can be a Big Sister to a young boy in certain circumstances, because there are many more female mentors than males. The program has an acute need for men to volunteer as Big Brothers for the large number of boys on the waiting list.Mentors undergo in-depth interviews. Screened applicants are matched with Littles based on similar interests, hobbies, and personal traits. “We’re not going to match a kid who wants to go to the library with someone who wants to play basketball,” Bull said.Although some duos may not immediately hit it off, Bull said matches are usually successful. “We have a wonderful length of our matches,” she said. “An average of 3 ½ years more than the national averages. And a lot of people stay in touch for a lifetime.”Training and case managers who check in regularly and monthly group activities with other Bigs and Littles, help a new mentor break the ice. “We let them know they’re not alone,” said Bull.Bull said the program stresses the duo should participate in low cost, simple activities, such as a trip to the park or shooting hoops. “It’s about building a friendship,” she said. “The child needs special one-to-one attention.”In addition to the traditional community-based programs, BBBS has other programs including one at Monmouth University that pairs college student mentors with Asbury Park high school students, similar to a peer-to-peer mentoring relationship.Bull finds many of the Littles in the program never thought about college but after meeting with the college students and touring the university, they “start to really see themselves in that environment.”She cites a Little Brother who not only went on to attend Monmouth University, but is now a Big Brother in the program.In addition, a program focused on a workplace environment, like Monmouth Medical Center and New Jersey Natural Gas, matches employees at all levels – from IT techs to senior vice presidents – with Littles.“The kids get a sense of a lot of different opportunities,” Bull said.Mentoring allows volunteers a chance to “see life through a child’s eyes again,” said Bull, who has been with BBBS for 15 years. “I’ve gotten to see how it makes such a difference in an impressionable child. How this person can impart their wisdom and help with everything from homework to life skills. D.J. and his Big Brother Justin Brown celebrate D.J.’s induction to the National Honor Society last year. Photo: BBBS“From Day One, it felt so natural, the first time we hung out,” said Justin Brown, 35, who became a Big Brother to D.J. in 2010. “He has such a wide-open personality.” (At the BBBS request, D.J.’s last name is being withheld to protect his privacy.)As a teacher, previously at Lakewood High School and now at Neptune High School, Brown said he sees a lot of kids “missing that strong role model.”In those early days, when D.J. was in 7th grade, he and Brown would go for pizza or take a trip to the beach.D.J. was an active Boy Scout – he is now working on his Eagle Scout project – so they found a common interest in the outdoors. “We did a lot of outdoor stuff – hiking, kayaking,” said Brown, who was also a Boy Scout. “It was all the things I like to do.”“D.J. comes from a good family,” Brown said, and credits D.J.’s grandmother for being very involved in his life. With an older sister who went to college, it was always expected that D.J. would go on for a degree. “His grandmother was pushing him not to let outside forces take him down the wrong road.”As a Big Brother, Brown said, “I think I gave him a big-picture perspective.”“It’s been just a good feeling, just to be there, to see him grow so much,” said Brown. “It’s been a positive influence in my life, too.“As a teacher you develop bonds with students, but with D.J., I really feel he’s part of my family.“He’s just my little brother,” said Brown, “he’s been part of my life.”So much so that two years ago D.J. served as a groomsman in Brown’s wedding.“D.J. will be part of my life forever.”For D.J., who will turn 18 soon, much of his high school senior year has been spent getting ready for college. He has already been accepted to a host of schools, including NJIT, University of Delaware, Drexel University, SUNY Alfred and Monmouth University, and is waiting on decisions from a few more. He plans to study medical engineering.Both men agree college was always in D.J.’s plans.“My grades were spot on – A’s and B’s,” D.J. said. “It was the internal stuff” that he feels he needed from his Big Brother.“I live in a family full of girls,” said D.J. “I have 10 half sisters.”Over the years, D.J. consulted with Brown about everything from homework and colleges to social pressures and girls.“He’s got the girl thing covered,” D.J. said.As mentors go, D.J. thinks his match was perfect. “We share nearly everything in common. He likes everything I love to do,” said D.J. “He’s actually a brother to me.”And now D.J. looks forward to his new role: as “big brother” to Brown’s 5-month old son River. So too will be a special person in his life – his “Big Brother” Justin Brown, a 35- year-old high school teacher who volunteers his time through Big Brothers Big Sisters. By Judy O’Gorman AlvarezWhen high school senior D.J. accepts his diploma at Long Branch High School graduation this June, his family will be proudly watching. “If you think about one child at a time,” she said, and then “if you look at the big picture, it changes lives for generations.”last_img read more