FL man realizes he can’t drive stick shift during carjacking

first_imgAn Orlando man is behind bars after realizing he could not drive stick shift mid-carjacking.Police say 25-year-old Jaelyn Alexander was in the process of fleeing the scene with elderly man’s car before he ‘automatically’ realized he could not drive a stick.Alexander then stole another car and fled the scene.He was arrested near the scene, shortly after.Alexander is facing multiple charges including carjacking, battery on a person over the age of 65, and grand theft.last_img

Another lackluster 3rd period leads to 6-3 loss to Northwestern

first_img Published on October 12, 2019 at 8:13 pm Contact Gaurav: gshetty@syr.edu Facebook Twitter Google+ Just 37 seconds into the third period, forward Emma Polaski was sent to the box for interference. Then, Kristen Siermachesky joined her in the box a minute later. Going into the second intermission, Syracuse was down a goal. But the moment the third period began, Northeastern started pulling away. Gifted with a five-on-three powerplay, Northeastern punished Syracuse with a quick goal. The Orange were left chasing shadows for the rest of the game and were handed their fifth straight loss.“The third period was pretty ugly hockey,” said SU head coach Paul Flanagan. “It was like watching paint dry.”In front of a packed crowd for alumni weekend, Syracuse (0-5) faced off against No. 3 Northeastern (3-0) for the second time in two days. In the first two periods, both the Huskies and Orange went back-and-forth, leading to a 4-3 Northeastern advantage heading into the final period. But in the third, the Huskies extended their lead as the Orange scrambled to keep players out of the penalty box.Flanagan likened his team’s play in the third period to figure skaters — his team was slow and a step behind Northeastern for the entire third period. “We have to condition ourselves to play back-to-back games,” Flanagan said.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textIts sluggishness played a part in the seven penalties committed by the Orange. Most were minor stick penalties, like hooking and tripping, leading Syracuse to playing a large chunk of the game with four players on the ice. “You really don’t want to get into that type of play,” said Flanagan. “It’s like a broken record so far this year.”With just under five minutes remaining in the second period, the Huskies scored on a power play and took a 4-3 lead into the second intermission. Sophomore Lauren Bellefontaine tied the game 3-3 in the second, but succumbed along with her teammates to the Huskies third period onslaught. “I think once we got down 4-3 we just stopped skating and we stopped working,” said Bellefontaine. “If we just kept it up I think it would’ve been a totally different game.”This season, the Orange haven’t been overpowered by ranked opponents in the early stages of games. Then, fatigue kicks in, Syracuse commits penalties and struggles to keep pace.Against Clarkson, Boston College, and Northeastern — all top programs out of their conference — Syracuse couldn’t keep up with them at the end of their matchups. They start with penalties, and a lack of energy from load management lead to the close losses, and Syracuse’s early losing streak. The scoring started early in Saturday’s game as SU jumped out to a 1-0 lead with a goal just three minutes into the game. Five minutes later, Northeastern had the lead after scoring two goals in three minutes. Halfway through the first, the Orange tied it at two. However, with just two minutes remaining in the first period, Chloe Aurard scored on the powerplay to give the Huskies the lead going into the intermission.Friday’s game between the two was scoreless until the third period where Northeastern scored the game-winner in the final minutes. Saturday afternoon, the game was again tied. But the high scoring affair to start became one sided, and Syracuse couldn’t hang with the speed and skill of the Huskies in the third period.“The difference from yesterday and today is just the momentum,” said Eastwood. “We had a lot of energy yesterday and once they got up on us in the third period we lost that energy and we lost our legs.”Flanagan said SU needs to find a balance this season or it’ll continue to face the cumulative effect of its problems. Despite the never ending cycle of a season that the players face, Flanagan believes that his team can find a way to get it together.“At the end of the day we’re better for it, so you can’t get disappointed right now,” said Flanagan. “You look at our record you want to get down, but we turn our focus to next Friday night.” Commentslast_img read more

Clear Lake council to discuss early retirement incentive program

first_imgCLEAR LAKE — Clear Lake’s City Council tonight will discuss establishing an early retirement incentive program. The voluntary program would assist eligible city employees who wish to retire but cannot do so because of medical insurance coverage concerns. To be eligible, participants would have to be current full-time or full-time equivalent employees who are age 56 or older and have not less than 25 years of continuous employment with the city. Those who would participate in the program at age 60 would remain up to five years or when they become Medicare eligible on the city’s group health insurance plan under a single policy. Employees can choose to continue family health coverage by paying the difference between the cost of the family plan and the city’s contribution toward a single coverage premium. An employee who retires prior to age 60 can utilize post-retirement accumulated paid leave conversion credit to pay health insurance premiums. If that would be insufficient to cover the cost of health insurance to the age of 60, the employee would be responsible for the full premium until age 60, at which point the premium for a single policy would be covered by the city.Eligible employees must retire from city employment between August 1st and September 30th of this year, with notice of intent to retire having to be filed prior to July 17th. The Clear Lake City Council meets tonight at 6 o’clock at City Hall.last_img read more