Bipartisan Move in Congress to Thwart Trade Petition Aimed at Driving Up Solar-Panel Prices

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Washington Examiner:Republican and Democratic lawmakers on Friday defended U.S. installers of rooftop solar panels and made an effort to beat back a pending decision that could make imported solar panels more expensive.Bipartisan letters from 16 senators and 53 congressman were sent to International Trade Commission Chairman Rhonda Schmidtlein, and urged the agency to reject a petition by Chinese and German-owned companies that manufactured solar panels and cells in the U.S., but have since gone bankrupt.The two foreign-owned companies that produced in the U.S. were seeking protection from imports that they say is hurting U.S.-based manufacturing. But the lawmakers wrote in their letters that imposing duties on these imports would only increase costs for domestic companies that install rooftop solar panels.“Solar companies in our states believe the requested trade protection would double the price of solar panels,” the Senate letter read. “Increasing costs will stop solar growth dead in its tracks, threatening tens of thousands of American workers in the solar industry and jeopardizing billions of dollars in investment in communities across the country.”Sens. Thom Tillis, R-N.C., and Martin Heinrich, D-N.M., spearheaded the letter writing campaign on the Senate side. Reps. Mark Sanford, R-S.C., Mike Thompson, D-Calif., Pat Meehan, R-Pa., and Matt Cartwright, D-Pa., did the same in the House of Representatives.The letters were sent ahead of the trade commission’s Aug. 15 hearing on the petition by Chinese-owned Suniva and German-owned Solar World. The ITC’s role in the case is to decide if imports are hurting U.S.-based manufacturing, even if through the import of fairly traded goods.The Solar Energy Industry Association, the main trade group for the U.S. solar industry, explained that the “agency is considering whether these two companies out of more than 8,000 across the U.S. solar industry deserve tariff relief that would impact the entire market.” The group is opposing the companies’ request at the agency.Abigail Ross Hopper, president and CEO of the solar industry group, said the lawmakers effort shows that “trade tariffs are not a red or blue state issue.”The solar energy industry has created 1 out of 50 new jobs within the U.S. in the last year, according to SEIA.More: Republicans, Democrats join forces to protect rooftop solar installers Bipartisan Move in Congress to Thwart Trade Petition Aimed at Driving Up Solar-Panel Priceslast_img read more

Clayton Kershaw will start NLCS Game 1 for Dodgers

first_imgATLANTA — Order has been restored.The Dodgers broke with expectations and started Hyun-Jin Ryu in Game 1 of their National League Division Series against the Atlanta Braves, not Clayton Kershaw.They won’t do that again.Sign up for our Inside the Dodgers newsletter. Be the best Dodger fan you can be by getting daily intel on your favorite team. Subscribe here.Dodgers manager Dave Roberts said before Monday’s victory over the Braves that Kershaw would start the team’s next playoff game whether it was Game 5 against the Braves or Game 1 of the NL Championship Series against the Milwaukee Brewers. Dodgers’ Max Muncy trying to work his way out of slow start “Looking forward to it,” he said.Asked if he took any special pride in once again being the team’s Game 1 starter, he wouldn’t admit to it.“No, I don’t know. I want to pitch,” he said. “I’m pitching Game 1. That’s great.”It’s likely Kershaw and Walker Buehler will start Games 1 and 2 (both on extra rest) at Miller Park with Ryu held back to Dodger Stadium, where he has been dominant this season (including seven scoreless innings in Game 1 against the Braves).VETERAN PICKUPSThe Dodgers are supposed to be run by statistically-focused decision-makers who make moves based on the numbers.“Yeah, that’s what I keep hearing,” Dodgers GM Farhan Zaidi.But they have also shown a fondness for adding veteran players late in the season whose skills have diminished, making them more valued for their character and experience – from Chase Utley to Curtis Granderson to David Freese and Ryan Madson this year.Freese and Madson proved critical in turning Monday’s Game 4 to the Dodgers.“We’re not trying to prove anything to anyone. We’re just trying to win a World Series,” Zaidi said. “We’ll continue to make unique moves and evaluate players in a way that gives us the best chance.”FREESE UPFreese laughed off the suggestion that his extensive postseason experience – and success in those situations – gives him some kind of advantage in October.“No, no,” he said. “Every year, guys do great things in the postseason. There’s tons of guys that do really cool things in the postseason.”Freese did some really cool things in 2011 for the St. Louis Cardinals, winning the MVP award in both the NLCS and World Series. He points to that as proof experience doesn’t necessarily mean a thing.“Two-thousand-eleven was the first year I was in the postseason,” said Freese whose two-out, two-run pinch-hit single in the sixth inning Monday gave the Dodgers a 3-2 lead. “Good things just happen. It’s all about the opportunity. If you get the opportunity good things can happen.”Related Articles Fire danger is on Dave Roberts’ mind as Dodgers head to San Francisco Cody Bellinger homer gives Dodgers their first walkoff win of season How Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling topped the baseball podcast empire Dodgers hit seven home runs, sweep Colorado Rockies The Dodgers advanced to the NLCS for a third consecutive year and Kershaw will start Friday in Milwaukee, at a time to be announced.“It was pretty simple,” Roberts said. “I think that we had our reasons why we decided on Game 1 vs. Game 2. But if there’s a potential Game 5, we feel very confident that Clayton should be the guy taking the baseball.”Kershaw made the best postseason start of his career in Game 2, holding the Braves to two hits in eight scoreless innings. Afterward, he admitted that he took a little extra pleasure from the performance because of the Dodgers’ decision to start Ryu ahead of him.“Yeah, maybe,” he said with a smile after Game 2. “Maybe a tick, for sure.”In the celebratory locker room after the Dodgers’ win Monday, however, Kershaw kept any feelings of vindication to himself. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

Dave Chappelle addresses LeBron James vs. Laura Ingraham, Kobe Bryant’s death in new special

first_imgNetflix dropped a surprise Dave Chappelle stand-up special Friday morning, but the 46-year-old comedian clearly had more on his mind than punchlines.Chappelle covered a number of hot-button issues in “8:46,” a title referencing the amount of time former Minneapolis police offer Derek Chauvin kneeled on George Floyd’s neck. Video of the incident has sparked nationwide outrage and protests against racial injustice and police brutality, and Chauvin was later charged with second-degree murder. MORE: How Colin Kaepernick’s protest started a movement in NFLAbout 15 minutes into his set, which was filmed in Yellow Springs, Ohio, and followed social distancing guidelines amid the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, Chappelle ripped Fox News host Laura Ingraham and defended Lakers star LeBron James, “one of Ohio’s greatest residents ever” in Chappelle’s eyes. Ingraham recently faced criticism for saying Saints quarterback Drew Brees had the right to share his views about NFL players kneeling during the national anthem after previously telling James to “shut up and dribble” when it comes to politics.”Let me tell you something about LeBron. This n— was on the cover of Sports Illustrated when he was 17 years old and exceeded every expectation that they had for him,” Chappelle said. “This business is treacherous. This is a good guy, LeBron. He’s a family man, and this, that and the other. He didn’t let anyone down. …”This b— told my friend to ‘shut up and dribble.’ My friend is the best at something, and this b— is not the best at anything. Just a regular-ass white b— with a platform. And I use the word ‘b—’ all the time because [it’s a black thing].”Dave Chappelle with some praise for LeBron James for speaking up on racism courtesy of @NetflixIsAJoke: pic.twitter.com/RcU5iaZMoY— The Lakers Review (@TheLakersReview) June 12, 2020Near the end of the 27-minute special, Chappelle spoke about the impact of Kobe Bryant’s death. The Lakers legend died in a helicopter crash on Jan. 26, 2020, the same day Chappelle won a Grammy award for Best Comedy Album. He also noted his birthday, Aug. 24, is a combination of the two numbers Bryant wore during his NBA career.”I loved Kobe Bryant,” Chappelle said. “He died the day I won a Grammy. He died. That’s why I didn’t show up at the Grammys, because Kobe died. … I cried like a baby.” “I loved Kobe Bryant. He died the day I won a Grammy. That’s why I didn’t show up at the Grammys, because Kobe died. They had both of his f—–g jersey numbers hanging up – 8, 24. Well that’s my birthday. I cried like a baby.” – Dave Chappellevia “8:46” pic.twitter.com/6FsOtHrdaX— The Undefeated (@TheUndefeated) June 12, 2020There are a few jokes sprinkled throughout “8:46,” but it is more a stream of consciousness than a typical stand-up routine. This is the most raw version of Chappelle and, arguably, the most captivating.You can watch the full special below (explicit language).last_img read more