Minors looking to reach decider for second successive year

first_imgHe’s been impressed by what he’s seen of Tipperary.Tipp FM’s build-up to this game begins at 1.15 with throw-in at 1.30.  Our coverage will be brought to you in association with Jamie Lawlor Crash Repairs, Ard Gaoithe Business Park, Clonmel. Like their senior counterparts they also met in 2015, albeit in the final itself.Tipp coach Mikey Beevans has this assesment of the Tribesmen’s current standing.Jeffrey Lynskey led Galway to the Irish Press Cup just under twelve months ago and is still at the helm of the side.last_img read more

All the coaches who have managed Tottenham Hotspur in the 21st century

first_imgThere is a new boss in North London as Jose Mourinho makes a return to football coaching duty after being named the new head coach of Tottenham Hotspurs.After five years in charge of Spurs, Mauricio Pochettino was shown the exit door for failing to deliver trophies and a poor start to the season, just five months after taking the club to its first UEFA Champions League finals.Despite losing to Liverpool in Madrid by a lone goal, the incredible story of their Champions League campaign and a first-ever final will forever be remembered.Now the love story between Argentine and the club is over and former Chelsea boss, Jose Mourinho has been appointed as manager until 2023.But, how many permanent managers have Tottenham Hotspur appointed for the first team since the start of the 21st century?While some appointments were on a short-term basis, many others were given permanent deals but could not stand the test of time at the club.Here is the list of coaches Spurs have had in the 21st centuryGlenn Hoddle (2001-2003)Hoddle was named Spurs’ manager in March 2001, taking over from John Graham. He lasted just two years at the club.PIC ALAN WALTER 220202TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR V SUNDERLAND FA PremiershipSpurs manager GLENN HODDLEHe took the club to the League Cup final, where they lost to Blackburn Rovers. In his stint at the club, he guided Tottenham to ninth and tenth place finishes respectively.Jacques Santini (2004-2004)The Frenchman’s reign is perhaps the shortest in the history of the club.Santini after 13 years resigned from the post due to personal problems. However, after his departure, it was widely reported that he left because of a series of disagreements with the then Sporting Director, Frank Arnesen.Speaking in 2005, Santini said he quit partly because he felt agreements with the club were broken, but he admitted he “dug his own grave” by agreeing to join the club before the end of Euro 2004.Martin Jol (2004-2007)After the resignation of Jacques Santini, Martin Jol, his assistant was named as his successor on November 8, 2004.He led Spurs to ninth position after taking over the club.In the summer of the 2005/2006 season, he signed a new three-year contract.He led the team to its highest finish since 1990, fifth.The club board sacked Martin Jol on 25th October, 2008 after Spurs’ 2-1 defeat to Getafe in the UEFA Cup.Juande Ramos (2007-2008)Spanish international, Juande Ramos took over from Martin Jol.He helped the club to its first trophy since 1999 after beating London rivals, Chelsea in the League Cup.After a poor start to the 2008-2009 season where he won just two points in eight matches, he was dismissed together with his assistant, Gus Poyet on October 25, 2008.Harry Redknapp (2008-2012)Harry Redknapp immediately replaced Juande Ramos at the club. He led the club to their second-highest finish in three years.On June 13, 2012, he was dismissed after failing to agree to new terms with the club over a pending contract.André Villas-Boas (2012-2013)André Villas-Boas was named the new manager of Tottenham Hotspur on 3 July 2012, taking over from Harry Redknapp.He helped the club accrue its highest points after earning 72 points.After a series of poor results in the Premier League including a 6-0 loss to Manchester City and a 5-0 defeat to Liverpool, he left his position as the manager.He left the club on December 16, 2013.Tim Sherwood (2013-2014)Tim Alan Sherwood assumed first-team duties on 16th December 2013, replacing Villas-Boas.A week later, he was given a permanent 18 months.Sherwood achieved a sixth-place finish in the league with Spurs with a total of 69 league points. He was, however, sacked by Chairman Daniel Levy on 13 May 2014.Mauricio Pochettino (2014-2019)On 27 May 2014, Pochettino was appointed head coach of Tottenham Hotspur on a five-year contract, replacing Tim Sherwood.He took the club to another League Cup finals in January 2015 but lost to Chelsea by 2-0.On 12 May 2016, Pochettino agreed to a contract extension.He had guided Spurs to their first Champions League final five months ago.Despite turning Tottenham into a consistent top-four team in the Premier League and a title contender, Pochettino has been criticized for failing to win any silverware in his time at the club.Jose Mourinho (2019-?)last_img read more

FAMILY VALUES – WHY DONEGAL’S KERRYMEN MAY BE SLEEPING IN THE SPARE ROOM!

first_imgCome the final whistle after today’s All Ireland quarter final, the respective Walsh households will be a difficult place to live for certain members of the family. Donegal women Roisin and Caroline Walsh just happen to be married to Kerry brothers Justin and Diarmuid Walsh.But they have refused to follow the Kingdom and will be proudly wearing the green and gold of Tir Chonaill today.Justin and Caroline (nee Sweeney) both work in Letterkenny IT while his brother Diarmuid and wife Roisin are both teachers in Inishowen.Both families have just returned from holidaying in the Kingdom but will be travelling to Croke Park today to support their teams. While in Kerry, Caroline, who is on the Committee for Relay for Life Donegal, met up with the Chair and Vice Chair of the Donegal Association of Kerry, who are keen to offer their support for Relay for Life by promoting and selling the Daniel O’Donnell’s CD (I’ll see this journey through) on the committees behalf and are also putting plans in place to organise a fundraising event for Relay for Life Donegal 2013.The Association was founded in March 2011 by Sean Gallagher.Living in Killorglin with his wife Mary, the Inver native is having great sport with the people of Kerry. With over 100 members the Donegal Association of Kerry is enjoying the tribal banter in all corners of the county this week as today’s showdown looms.“I think it is any team’s game and it is going to be tight. We are a farly tight-knit community here in Kerry alright, we’d have to be in a week like this, but the craic is mighty,” said Sean.Included in the picture are Sean Gallagher (back row – second in from right hand side), Kieran Boyle (back row on left hand side), Bridget Moore (formerly McElhinney, Creeslough) with her husband John from Causeway, Co Kerry. Bridget’s nephew, Martin McElhinney is on the Donegal panel for Sunday which makes it all the more exciting but although John would love to see Martin getting a medal, he will definitely be cheering for Kerry on the day! Also included of course are The Walsh families – Justin and Caroline with kids Sarah and Darragh (wearing Kerry Jerseys!!) and Diarmuid and Roisin with kids, Donal, Aoife and Michael (wearing Donegal Jerseys).    FAMILY VALUES – WHY DONEGAL’S KERRYMEN MAY BE SLEEPING IN THE SPARE ROOM! was last modified: August 5th, 2012 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Pushing the boundaries of experiential travel to t

first_imgPushing the boundaries of experiential travel to the natural world, Ecuador’s Mashpi Lodge has launched its highly-anticipated Dragonfly canopy gondola for guests to enjoy captivating bird’s eye views of the 1300-hectare Mashpi Rainforest Reserve via a cable-driven system of gondolas that glide above, below and through the tree canopy up to 200 metres above the ground and travelling two kilometres across the magical cloud forest with Mashpi’s resident naturalists to identify the sights and sounds of the forest.Comprising three different stations and embarkation points located at different altitudes, guests can choose whether to combine a ride on The Dragonfly with a testing hike through the forest and along the riverbed, or to take the full two-hour return trip for a more relaxing experience, while still accessing hidden waterfalls, swimming holes and walking trails. Adhering to Mashpi’s sustainability ethos, The Dragonfly was carefully constructed over a period of 18 months largely by hand and without the use of any heavy machinery, to ensure minimal impact to the Reserve and its wildlife. Much like the lodge itself, The Dragonfly is powered by renewable energy and designed to blend seamlessly and silently into the surrounding forest.Opened in April 2012, and last year selected as a founding member of National Geographic ‘Unique Lodges of the World’, Mashpi Lodge is an intimate cocoon in the clouds, accommodating 44 guests in 22 understated yet luxurious rooms. The contemporary glass and steel structure features floor-to-ceiling windows, giving remarkable views of the forested mountains on one side and the rainforest up close on the other.A paradise for nature lovers, Mashpi Lodge features an immersive Life Centre, where wildlife enthusiasts can learn more about the Reserve’s magical inhabitants including 500 species of bird, as well as butterflies, frogs and monkeys. The Hummingbird Viewpoint offers avid birders an unrivalled setting for bird-watching, featuring a shelter with seating and feeders for the birds strung from its roof. Mashpi’s unique ‘Sky Bike’ is another truly thrilling way to explore the canopy up close, as guests pedal their way along a cable stretched between the trees, while the climb to the top of the 26m-high Observation Tower rewards with panoramic views across the forest.Back indoors, guests can be pampered in the Wellness Area, indulging in specialised massages using natural ingredients from the forest. The double height dining room offers exquisite Ecuadorian cuisine inspired by flavours of the forest, utilising regional ingredients such as naranjilla, papaya, palm heart, coffee, manioc, chocolate and plantain.Rates start from $1437 per room per night based on two sharing, including all activities, meals, guiding and return transfers from central Quito hotels.last_img read more

Update Surprise Innovation bill clears House heads to president

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The top Democrat on the science committee, Representative Eddie Bernice Johnson (D–TX), hinted at the work it took to complete the bill. “I did not always believe we would arrive at this agreement,” Johnson said in a statement. “The partisan and widely criticized House-passed version of an America Competes Act Reauthorization (H.R. 1806) was miles apart from the widely supported bipartisan Senate bill. The version of S. 3084 before us today represents what we can achieve when all parties agree to listen to each other, and perhaps more importantly, to the experts in the agencies and the stakeholder communities.” The Association of American Universities, a Washington, D.C.–based coalition of 62 research universities, captured the surprising finale with a statement from its president, Mary Sue Coleman: “With two outs in the bottom of the ninth inning, Congress has come through and passed the American Innovation and Competitiveness Act. We applaud this bipartisan action. This was a case in which a legislative process that carefully balanced competing interests and took into account the input provided by the university community was rewarded with enactment of good legislation.”The bill now goes to President Barack Obama, who is expected to sign it. It will replace a 2010 reauthorization that expired in 2013.Here is our earlier story, published on 12 December:In the predawn hours Saturday, the U.S. Senate passed a bill to bolster innovation and research activities at NSF, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and various research and education programs managed by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (see earlier story below).The legislation’s bipartisan appeal allowed it to win unanimous approval shortly before the Senate adjourned for the year after passing a spending bill that freezes agency budgets through April 2017 and avoided a government shutdown. But procedural objections by one senator prevented the Senate from acting quickly enough to send the bill to the House of Representatives before its members left town last Thursday.That means the bill won’t be going to President Barack Obama’s desk to be signed into law. Still, supporters are hoping that the hard-fought compromise serves as a template for quick action after the new Congress convenes in January 2017.“This legislation represents a bipartisan and bicameral approach to boosting innovation and maximizing scientific research opportunities that Congress will pick up next year,” said Senator John Thune (R–SD), who chairs the Senate commerce and science committee that crafted S. 3084, the American Innovation and Competitiveness Act. “I congratulate Sen. [Cory] Gardner and Sen. [Gary] Peters for their outstanding efforts. … I also appreciate House Science Committee Chairman Lamar Smith and Ranking Member Eddie Bernice Johnson for working with us to find an agreement that can pass both chambers.”Here is our original story, published on 5 December:Congress is poised to back NSF’s approach to researchCongress has reached a truce—and possibly a lasting settlement—in the fiercely partisan 3-year war between Republican leaders in the House of Representatives and the scientific community over how NSF should operate. The terms of the agreement, between House and Senate negotiators, may seem like minor changes. But the compromise, which the Senate could adopt as early as this week, resolves differences over how NSF should conduct peer review and manage research in ways that the agency thinks it can live with.The battleground is a reauthorization of the 2010 America Creating Opportunities to Meaningfully Promote Excellence in Technology, Education, and Science (COMPETES) Act, which sets out policies governing NSF, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and federal programs on innovation, manufacturing, and science and math education. Reauthorization bills don’t fund an agency, but they provide important policy guidance.Since 2013, the House has adopted a succession of bills containing language that scientific leaders argued would have restricted NSF’s ability to support the best research. The strategy, coordinated by Representative Lamar Smith (R–TX), chairman of the House science committee, over the objections of committee Democrats, included favoring some disciplines over others and linking basic research projects more tightly to improvements in health, the economy, and national security. Republicans said they were simply trying to ensure that every NSF grant serves “the national interest.” But many scientists interpreted that language to mean NSF should tilt toward funding applied research with obvious payoffs.Their Senate counterparts, in contrast, united behind a single, bipartisan piece of legislation crafted by senators Cory Gardner (R–CO) and Gary Peters (D–MI) that scientists saw as much more supportive of the research enterprise. And it is that bill (S.3084), which was approved earlier this year by its science committee but never reached the Senate floor, that seems to have largely prevailed when legislators from both houses sat down to reconcile their different approaches.The final text strongly endorses the two criteria NSF now uses to judge its grant applicants—the “intellectual merit” of the idea, and the “broader impacts” of the research on society. The “national interest” categories favored by Representative Smith remain in the bill—increasing economic competitiveness, advancing the health and welfare of the public, training a globally competitive workforce, strengthening national security, and enhancing partnerships between academia and industry. But they are now listed as examples of how researchers can satisfy NSF’s second criterion—broader impacts—rather than as the primary rationale for the proposed research.   At the same time, senators bowed to their House counterparts by removing language setting any spending targets. The original Senate bill called for a 4% boost for NSF and NIST in 2018. But House leadership has banished any statements in authorization bills relating to a desired amount of future funding, in keeping with their commitment to reduce the federal deficit. So the conferenced COMPETES bill is silent on funding levels for any specific program, as well as for the agencies as a whole.Senate leaders are hoping to win passage this week of the bill, which as of this morning had not been publicly posted on a government website. Its prospects are less clear in the House. And its status could be affected by how soon Congress adopts an extension of the spending freeze that applies to the current budgets of every agency.Science lobbyists are still parsing the language. But some are already reacting more favorably than they did to earlier versions, which they regarded as worse than no bill at all. According to a spokesperson for the Association of American Universities based in Washington, D.C., the compromise “balances and takes into account input provided by the university community while at the same time addressing major congressional issues and concerns.”NSF is not officially commenting on the bill. But one agency official who requested anonymity said there are no poison pills in it, and that much of the bill seems to offer support for things NSF is already doing.The bill also addresses several issues that have spurred sharp debate in recent years. NSF’s flawed oversight of the National Ecological Observatory Network, for example, has led to tighter oversight of large facilities. Congressional displeasure with the large salaries of some academic scientists, called rotators, coming to NSF for stints of 2 to 4 years has prompted new reporting requirements. But other issues transcend the agency, like reducing the administrative burden on universities receiving federal funds, policing scientific misconduct, and allowing for travel to scientific conferences.Here are selected provisions: Email The bill would require a formal analysis of the proposed cost of a large facility before construction begins, and another while it is being built. Management fees are still allowed (the House had wanted to ban them), but their use must be closely monitored. NSF must provide written justification for the salaries of every rotator earning more than a senior government manager in the equivalent job. NSF must notify other federal agencies when it issues a finding of scientific misconduct. The bill does not say whether the notification must be made public. The language addresses concerns that such “bad apples” might be funded by another government agency. A long-running program meant to help states that receive relatively few federal research dollars would become a permanent feature of NSF’s portfolio. The “E” in the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research would be changed to “established,” in recognition that few states have ever graduated out of the program. An interagency working group would be created within the White House to examine ways to reduce the paperwork associated with receiving a federal research grant. It is seen as complementing a provision in medical reform bill poised to become law, the 21st Century Cures Act, that would create a Research Policy Board with the same mission. The bill would require federal agencies to clarify their policies on travel to scientific conferences and workshops. It endorses the importance of allowing employees to attend scientific conferences and workshops to share their findings and foster collaborative research. This afternoon the U.S. House of Representatives passed the compromise version of S. 3084, meaning that it will soon become law. The surprising turn ends a 4-year odyssey for legislation that triggered a bitter partisan battle over how the National Science Foundation (NSF) manages its $7 billion research portfolio.The last step came after House members had gone home for the holidays—but left themselves a parliamentary loophole through which to pass unoffending legislation. That allowed a recently negotiated compromise between the House and Senate versions of the bill (see story, below) to make its way onto the House floor today. Representative Barry Loudermilk (R–GA) introduced the measure, and though no actual vote was taken, the bill was deemed passed by unanimous consent.“This bill maximizes the nation’s investment in basic research, and helps boost U.S. competitiveness, creates jobs and spurs new business and industries,” said Representative Lamar Smith (R–TX), who chairs the House science committee, in a statement issued shortly after the vote. “It improves accountability and transparency, reduces administrative burden on researchers, enhances agency oversight, which improves research coordination, and reforms federal science agency programs to increase the impact of taxpayer-funded research.”last_img read more