Taylor Swift master tapes sold by Scooter Braun to investment fund

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Ireland face battle for World Cup

first_img Press Association South Africa and the United States are expected to pose the greatest threats to Ireland’s £100million bid to host Rugby World Cup 2023. The Irish Rugby Football Union (IRFU) has confirmed an all-Ireland bid to stage the world contest in nine years’ time. The Northern Ireland Executive and Irish Government are underpinning the joint bid to secure rugby’s global showpiece. World Rugby expects the 2023 hosts to be selected in 2017, leaving Ireland quick off the mark in acclaiming their intentions. “This is an exciting announcement that further underscores the enormous prestige, appeal and benefits of hosting Rugby World Cup for both unions and governments alike,” said a World Rugby spokesman in response to Ireland confirming their intentions so quickly. Ireland’s bid will be for sole staging of the tournament, and will not include any help from the likes of the Welsh or Scottish Rugby Union. Dublin’s Aviva Stadium, Ulster’s Kingspan ground at Ravenhill and Limerick’s Thomond Park will form the centrepiece venues. Ireland’s bid will also draw upon a host of Gaelic football stadia, with the 82,300-capacity Croke Park in Dublin at the forefront of that collaboration. Political administrations in Ireland’s north and south have given the bid the green light after a 10-month preliminary assessment exercise. Irish premier Taoiseach Enda Kenny, Stormont’s First Minister Peter Robinson and Deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness joined IRFU boss Browne to announce the bid in Armagh on Friday. England will host next year’s World Cup before the tournament descends on Japan in 2019, with World Rugby making good on long-held promises to grow the game beyond traditional heartlands. South Africa staged one of the most memorable tournaments in 1995, the hosts holding off New Zealand to claim glory under the jubilant and politically-poignant scenes of Nelson Mandela proudly sporting a Springboks shirt. New Zealand held the inaugural 1987 tournament, repeating hosting duties in 2011, while England will become the second nation to claim the honour twice, with 2015 following 1991. World Rugby could well aim to send the 2023 tournament back to a traditional rugby hotbed, after the 2019 shift to Japan: and that would leave South Africa strong contenders. The rugby-mad nation received a huge infrastructure boost for the FIFA football World Cup staged in 2010, so would argue much of the preparation work is already in place. Rugby’s rapid rise in America was cemented by New Zealand’s decision to face the US Eagles at Chicago’s Soldier Field en route to their November European tour. Chief executive Philip Browne said the IRFU and two Irish governments will expect to commit £100million to underwrite the possibility of staging the tournament. “It has been out there that South Africa has stated an interest, Italy has bid in the past and stated an interest again, while Argentina has stated interest too, and also the USA,” said Browne. “We are under no illusions it’s going to be competitive and we have to put our best foot forward. “At this stage we haven’t had to tender documents, we won’t get those for another 12 months or more. “For the Japan World Cup the guarantee tournament fee which has to be paid to Rugby World Cup is £96million. “One assumes we are going to have to pay at least that, probably more.” Governing body World Rugby will not officially launch the bidding process for Rugby World Cup 2023 host status until next year, and have not even finalised a timeline for applications. Ireland are the first nation to launch a bid for the 2023 tournament, but must now await further instruction from World Rugby on when to make any official tender. last_img read more

Volleyball returns home to host Cal and Stanford

first_imgJunyi Li | Daily TrojanFresh off of their trip to the desert, the No. 19 women’s volleyball team (13-4, 5-1 Pac-12) is back in the Galen Center this week to host Cal (11-6, 2-4) on Friday and No. 3 Stanford (13-2, 6-0) on Sunday. Arizona swept USC last Friday, handing the Trojans their first Pac-12 conference loss and snapping their five-game winning streak — but USC bounced back to beat Arizona State in four sets. The Trojans will return to the Galen Center, where they own an undefeated 5-0 record on home court this season, for this week’s games.“The good thing is we’ve been pretty good at home, in every one of the matches we played here at home this year, and so I’m hoping that they’ll do the same thing getting ready for Cal on Friday night,” head coach Mick Haley said. “That’s a big one: We gotta play Cal first, and if we can beat Cal on Friday night, then we’ll worry about Stanford on Sunday. But Cal is the big focus right now.”The Women of Troy will once again lean on a balanced offense spearheaded by senior opposite hitter Brittany Abercrombie. While the team struggled against the Wildcats, the Trojans regained their offensive composure against the Sun Devils, where four players recorded double-digit kills for USC, led by Abercrombie’s team-high 18 kills. The team also received a boost from senior opposite hitter Niki Withers, sophomore outside hitter Khalia Lanier, sophomore opposite hitter Daley Krage and senior middle blocker Danielle Geiger, who combined for 43 kills against Arizona State. Senior setter Reni Mayer-Whalley and sophomore setter Cindy Marina look to assist the team in setting up attacking opportunities. Expect the offense to revolve around an equal distribution of attacking opportunities much like it did against Arizona State. The Golden Bears are led by a trio of offensive threats. Senior outside hitter Antzela Dempi has 2.89 kills per set with 179 total kills, junior outside hitter Carmen Annevelink has 2.53 kills per set and 157 kills while freshman outside hitter Mima Mirkovic sports 2.63 kills per set with 163 total kills. The Golden Bears are looking to bounce back against USC after suffering two straight sweeps against Oregon and Oregon State. However, the odds are stacked against them, as they are 2-4 against Pac-12 opponents and are only 1-5 on the road this season, whereas USC has a perfect 5-0 home record this season and owns a 144-30 all-time record in the Galen Center.After a day’s break, the Women of Troy will be back in the Galen Center to face off against Pac-12 volleyball giant No. 3 Stanford. The Trojan defense has to prepare adequately against sophomore outside hitter Kathryn Plummer, who is averaging an astonishing 4.76 kills per set and has accumulated a total of 238 kills. Plummer’s kills per set rank 9th in Division I women’s volleyball. She is supported by sophomore middle blocker Audriana Fitzmorris and redshirt senior opposite hitter Merete Lutz, who are averaging 2.20 and 2.76 kills per set, respectively. Other notable offensive threats from the Cardinal include redshirt freshman outside hitter Michaela Keefe (1.91 kills per set), freshman outside hitter Meghan McClure (1.80 kills per set) and junior middle blocker Tami Alade (1.72 kills per set). The offensive firepower from Stanford will be key to setting the tone for the game. The Cardinal’s defense is anchored by Fitzmorris and Alade, who average 1.44 and 1.48 blocks per set, respectively, and will prove to be a tough challenge for the Trojans’ offense. The Women of Troy will have a monumental task in trying to contain the visiting No. 3 Cardinal. “October is always the hardest month for us to compete, so I’m hoping that what we learned in the past will help us through this, and I’m hoping we can come up with a couple of wins this weekend,” Haley said.The Trojans have had their fair share of tough challenges from several other opponents, but Sunday’s game against No. 3 Stanford will be one of the biggest games of the season. The Women of Troy will host the Golden Bears at 7 p.m. Friday and the Cardinal at 3 p.m. on Sunday.last_img read more

DUNGLOE MAN LOSES DEFAMATION COURT BATTLE WITH AER LINGUS

first_imgAer Lingus has won a High Court order preventing a businessman suing it for defamation over a written complaint made to Lithuanian police about his alleged drunken behaviour while abroad an Aer Lingus flight to Vilnius.Mr Justice John Hedigan ruled John McAuley had no reasonable chance of succeeding in his action against Aer Lingus; the pilot of the flight involved and a member of the cabin crew and granted the defendants an order dismissing the case.Mr McAuley, Cullion, Dungloe, Co Donegal had alleged he was slandered in front of other passengers and afterwards when the captain made a written report about the alleged incident to police in the Lithuanian capital. Aer Lingus had argued the case was frivolous and vexatious, bound to fail and disclosed no reasonable cause of action. It also claimed actions for slander are excluded under the Montreal Convention relating to rules for international carriage by air.Mr McAuley denied those claims and argued the case should not be struck out.In his substantive case, Mr McAuley alleged that, while on a flight to Vilnius on March 12th 2008, Captain Frank Feeney and a cabin crew member, Serena Wyse, accused Mr McAuley of being drunk and a nuisance aboard the aircraft.Mr McAuley claimed, during the flight, he was at all times sober, calm, polite, did not leave his seat nor raise his voice. He claimed he asked for four miniature bottles of wine during the flight, which was “the norm”, but alleged his request was refused in an unpleasant manner.He claimed he rang the bell on three occasions to enquire about the airline’s policy about serving drinks but the flight attendant refused to engage with him.On reaching the door to exit the aircraft, he claimed he was accused in front of other passengers by the flight attendant and the pilot of being intoxicated on board the aircraft. He claimed he was escorted off the aircraft by two Lithuanian police officers. He claimed the officers quickly established he was not intoxicated and allowed him to leave.He also claimed he was defamed in a report written by the pilot to the Lithuanian police alleging he had interfered with the cabin crew’s normal duties, continually looked for alcohol and confronted a flight attendant.The incident was reported in the press and Mr McAuley, whose partner and child reside in Lithuania, further claimed he was shocked and embarrassed by he way he was treated.The defendants denied the claims.In his judgment, Mr Justice Hedigan said the actions complained of occurred on the aircraft and on the tarmac immediately adjacent to the aircraft and were therefore governed by Article 17 of the Montreal Convention.It was clear from the convention the liability of the carrier is limited to cases of death or bodily harm, he said.Article 17 provides airlines are liable for damage sustained in the case of death and bodily injury of a passenger on condition the accident which caused death or injury took place on board the aircraft or in the course of any operations of embarking or disembarking, he noted.As a consequence of the convention, which was incorporated into Irish law in 2004, the judge said Mr McAuley could not succeed in his claim he was defamed while in the aircraft or while he was leaving the aircraft.endsDUNGLOE MAN LOSES DEFAMATION COURT BATTLE WITH AER LINGUS was last modified: March 25th, 2011 by gregShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:aer linguscourt casedefamationdrinkdungloelast_img read more