Developer fast-tracks final release to meet demand from buyers

first_imgA SUCCESSFUL sellout of stage one in just eight weeks has prompted the early release of the final stage of the up-market The Tilbury residential development at Coomera.The $30 million 69-townhome project is being developed by Gold Coast-based Bos Property Group.Project director Steve Harrison attributed The Tilbury’s early success to the elevated nature of the site at 39 Old Coach Rd, plus a stunning recreation club and lap pool overlooking the Gold Coast.“There are very few remaining sites in the growth corridor between Nerang and Ormeau that offer skyline views of the Gold Coast,” he said. “The townhomes are also very reasonably priced from $389,400 and feature quality finishes.” Bos Property Group project has Gold Coast skyline views.More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach North9 hours ago02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa1 day agoAll designs have three bedrooms, some with an additional study, and there are two and three-bathroom configurations with a split-level option.Mr Harrison said the majority of buyers were local owner-occupiers but the project had also drawn interest from Sydney and southeast Queensland investors.“When Bos Property Group bought the site in 2011 it had DA approval for 144 retirement units,” he said. “But the group decided to build less than half this amount on up-market townhomes that would all have expansive views of the Gold Coast.” The Tilbury features an 18m resort pool, club lounge, barbecue, entertainment areas and landscaped gardens.It is close to Coomera Marine Precinct, the $1 billion Coomera Town Centre project, M1 Motorway, Coomera train station and the $50 million Coomera Square. Completion is expected in July.last_img read more

Now retired, Bolt excited about the next chapter

first_imgIT was not the fastest 400m of Usain Bolt’s career (his lifetime best will go down in history as 45.28, dating back to 2007) but it was a landmark circuit for the Jamaican who has illuminated track and field these past nine years with his superhuman talent and his stellar personality.Twenty-four hours after his final race ended in the anguish of a torn hamstring on the anchor leg of the 4x100m, the Jamaican phenomenon was back on the track in the London Stadium, soaking up the adoration on a fitting farewell lap of honour at the end of the final session at the IAAF World Championships London 2017.Before setting off at walking pace, the Lightning Bolt was presented with a framed piece of lane seven of the original track in the same arena, in which he won the second of his three Olympic 100m titles (in a Games record of 9.63) and 200m titles (in 19.32) in 2012, by IAAF president Sebastian Coe and London Mayor Sadiq Khan.The trackside clock flashed up the world record times Bolt set at the 2009 IAAF World Championships in Berlin, 9.58 and 19.19, and he halted both at the 200m start and 100m start for a moment’s contemplation.“I was saying goodbye to the fans and I was saying goodbye to my events also,” said the 30-year-old, whose bronze in the 100m final on day two took his men’s record World Championships medal haul to 14.“I was just saying goodbye to everything. I think I almost cried. It was close, but it didn’t come.”Asked about the reaction from the sell-out London crowd, Bolt enthused: “It was brilliant. The support has not changed. I expected it.“It’s really sad that I have to walk away now but the energy of the crowd is great. The fans really love me and I appreciate that.“I have no regrets about running this year. The fans asked me. They wanted to see me one more year.“I wanted to do it for my fans. Without them, I wouldn’t have done what I’ve done. They gave me the energy.“I don’t think one championship is going to change what I’ve done. I remember after losing the 100m final, someone said, ‘Don’t worry. Muhammad Ali lost his last fight’.“I’ve proved myself year in, year out. I think the fact that I didn’t win my last race doesn’t affect what I’ve done in the sport.”Bolt started his career hampered by injury and, sadly, has finished with an injury too. “I had treatment last night and treatment today,” he said, “and I’ll have it treated until I get an MRI scan to see if it’s as bad as I think it is. After pulling my hamstring, I’m worried about it.“I just came out and did my best. It didn’t play out to the book but everything happens for a reason. I don’t know why. It’s just championships.”As for the future, Bolt said: “The first thing I’m going to do is go out and have some fun – just to party. I need to go out and have a drink. I’ve had a stressful championships.”And, beyond that, might there be a change of heart and a return to the track? “No,” said Bolt, emphatically. “I think I’ve seen too many people return and come back into the sport and shame themselves. I won’t be one of those persons.“I would like to stay involved in athletics but I’m not sure what specifically I’ll be doing. My agent is talking to Mr Coe to figure out in what way I can help out the sport.“I’m excited about it. Track and field gave me everything I have.” (Sportsmax.com)last_img read more