10 months agoNapoli coach Ancelotti delighted for matchwinner Milik

first_imgNapoli coach Ancelotti delighted for matchwinner Milikby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveNapoli coach Carlo Ancelotti was pleased with their 1-0 win over Cagliari.Arkadiusz Milik struck late to earn the points for Napoli.“He is a smart guy, who is able to deal with various situations in a balanced manner,” Ancelotti told Sky Sport Italia.“The Liverpool defeat was a heavy blow, but the reaction had already come a long time before this evening. I didn’t need to win at Cagliari to know this team had already shaken off the Anfield game.“This is a team with good prospects and we are doing very well, but in my view can do far better. We are very competitive. We were in the Champions League, we are in Serie A and will be in the Europa League.“I share the project with the club, so this is a structure that doesn’t let itself be influenced by one victory or defeat. We can really do well here.” About the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

10 months agoReal Madrid closing on deal for Malaga prospect Chechu

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Real Madrid closing on deal for Malaga prospect Chechuby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveReal Madrid are closing on a deal for Malaga prospect Chechu.Marca says Malaga defender Jose Martinez Lopez, known as Chechu, is on Real’s radar.The centre-back has been capped three times with the Under-17 national team and has drawn the attention of La Fabrica for his power and physical attributes.His height of 187 centimetres means that he dominates in the air in both areas.Chechu has been capped at U17 level by Spain. last_img read more

Mayor says Churchill cant wait until spring for rail service premier mulls

first_imgWINNIPEG – People in sub-arctic Churchill, Man., face the prospect of running out of heating fuel over the winter unless the region’s rail line is repaired and service is restored, Mayor Mike Spence said Wednesday.Spence met with federal and provincial politicians in Winnipeg and tried to persuade them to help the rail line’s owner speed up plans to repair damage from extensive flooding this spring.Denver-based Omnitrax has said it will be next spring before the many sections of washed-out track and damaged bridges can be assessed and fixed.“We need to deal with this right now. We can’t have a spring deadline,” Spence said.“Not having propane in the community — Manitoba housing units, private homes, private businesses, right? You run out of heat, you’re done.”The rail line is the only land link to the remote town of 900 on the western shore of Hudson Bay — a popular tourist destination for watching polar bears and beluga whales. Trains bring in food, fuel and other supplies, some of which are now being flown in at much higher cost.Fuel, heavy equipment and other goods can be brought in by ship, but the ice-free season is short and the winters are cold and long. The town does not have enough propane storage facilities to last an entire winter, Spence said.Omnitrax has said it has hired an engineering company that will take four weeks to assess the damage and list necessary repairs.The mayor wants the federal and provincial governments to put “boots on the ground” in the form of inspectors to help Omnitrax get a quicker assessment. He also wants government subsidies to cover the higher costs of shipping goods by air.Spence said he was encouraged after the meetings that included a chat with Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister.“What I took away from it was that there’s an opportunity here for collectively working together and seeing some positive results.”Pallister, who spoke to reporters before the meeting, said he is willing to consider subsidies and perhaps some help for repair work, but added he is not ready to make any specific commitments.“You don’t agree to a subsidy until you know what the subsidy is for,” Pallister said.“We haven’t assessed the damage on the rail line, for example. We don’t know the time frames. We don’t know the nature of the supplies that are needed.”A preliminary assessment has shown that flooding washed away the track bed in 19 places and damaged at least five bridges. Omnitrax has said another 30 bridges and 600 culverts need to be examined further.last_img read more

Ammar Baranbo UAEbased satellite broadcasting com

first_imgAmmar BaranboUAE-based satellite broadcasting company Yahlive has struck a deal with Adriatic Tours S.L., owners of Alpha One RTV Network, to launch an expanded bouquet of channels for the Balkan diaspora in the Middle East and North Africa.The bouquet, along with other free-to-air channels, is available to anyone in the MENA region that can receive signals from the Yahsat 1A satellite located at 52.5° East.The additional seven Balkan community-targeted channels include content available in several languages including Bosnian, Serbian, Croatian, Albanian, Turkish, Spanish, English and Arabic.This latest move forms part of the partnership deal struck in October 2015 with Mahir Zisko, general manager od Adriatic Tours S.L., which saw the introduction of the first Balkan TV bouquet for the Balkan community in Europe.The launch of an expanded Balkan bouquet on Yahlive follows  the latter launch of 57 Algerian channels of which 36 are exclusively available on the platform.The company says it has tripled its free-to-air channels in the region to over 247, 147 of which are exclusively available through Yahlive, in the last three months.“Our expanded offerings are designed to bring tailored content to different communities; hence we broadcast channels that are culturally and socially relevant. The Balkan community, living in MENA, holds immense significance for us and we are delighted to be able to air their favourite TV channels through Yahlive,” said Ammar Baranbo, Yahlive’s chief operating officer.“Today, Yahlive’s viewers have access to hundreds of channels in more than 12 languages. We are committed to working closely with broadcasters to ensure that we are offering more free-to-air TV channels to niche communities across our coverage area.”last_img read more

Air pollution kills 600000 children with India being worst affected says WHO

first_imgBy Dr. Ananya Mandal, MDOct 31 2018A report from the World Health Organisation (WHO) says that air pollution is responsible for killing nearly 600,000 children every year. Among millions of other children affected with the effects of air pollution it leads to severe symptoms of various conditions such as asthma, respiratory diseases, loss of intelligence, excessive weight gain and ear infections.According to the experts at the WHO parents can do little to prevent outside air pollution but can prevent household air pollution by using less polluting fuels at home for cooking and heating and by not smoking. WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said in a statement, “Polluted air is poisoning millions of children and ruining their lives… This is inexcusable. Every child should be able to breathe clean air so they can grow and fulfil their full potential.” The experts have added that major parts of continents of Asia, Latin America and Africa are one of the worst affected with air pollution.The WHO report titled “Prescribing Clean Air” has said that around 93 percent of kids around the world are affected by air pollution. This translates into 630 million children under the age of five years and 1.8 billion children under the age of 15 years. The percentage of children exposed to air pollution ranges from 52 percent in high income countries to up to 98 percent in the low and middle-income countries. The report was released Monday this week (29th of October 2018) right before the first Global Conference on Air Pollution and Health organized by the WHO in Geneva. Source:http://www.who.int/news-room/detail/29-10-2018-more-than-90-of-the-world%E2%80%99s-children-breathe-toxic-air-every-day or Download Air pollution and child health: prescribing clean air – advance copy (final version still in process) – pdf, 6.33Mb WHO Director-General tweeted, “We’re here because we know that #AirPollution is one of the biggest threats to global health, & we need to do something about it – urgently… 9 out of 10 people breathe air that has been polluted by traffic emissions, industry, agriculture and waste incineration” “The most tragic thing about these 7 million deaths is that they are so preventable. There is something we can do. It will require strong political will, swift action and endurance, but I am optimistic that we can, and must, do better,” he added.Related StoriesDaily intake for phosphates in infants, children can exceed health guidance valuesWhy Mattresses Could be a Health Threat to Sleeping ChildrenRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaMaria Neira, WHO’s head of environmental determinants of health has added that this level of air pollution had led to a rise in still births, preterm deliveries as well as conditions that have long term effect as adults. She said that that policy changes are needed to make long term effects around the world. “Something that is critical as well is this issue of the neuro-development. Imagine that our children will have less cognitive IQ. We are talking about putting at risk a new generation of having a reduced IQ. This is not only new but terribly shocking,” she added.According to the WHO, this conference “will provide the opportunity for world leaders; ministers of health, energy, and environment; mayors; heads of intergovernmental organizations; scientists and others to commit to act against this serious health threat.”The report added that there is an association between air pollution and ear infections such as otitis media among children. Air pollution also leads to conditions such as obesity and resulting insulin resistance in children. This puts them at a greater risk of diabetes later in life, the experts say. Respiratory problems such as childhood asthma, lung function deficiencies, lower respiratory tract infections and even cancers are more likely among children exposed to air pollution, the report says.India remains one of the worst affected nations with 101,788 Indian children less than five years being killed annually says the WHO report. It adds that one in 10 deaths among children under five years of age is due to air pollution. Death rates due to air pollution are 84.8 per 100,000 in India says the report. The death rates among children aged between 5 and 14 years due to air pollution was 7,234 (2.9 per 100,000).The report looked at air quality in the atmosphere and households of different countries and looked at deaths among children under five years and those between ages 5 and 14 years. The report adds that it is not just death but the long term effects of air pollution on the growth and development of the children that is more worrying. There are several impacts of air pollution of long term physical as well as cognitive and intellectual development of the children says the report.last_img read more

Implementation of HRRP program associated with increased mortality after discharge

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Dec 24 2018Bottom Line: The Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program (HRRP) was created under the Affordable Care Act and hospitals face financial penalties for higher-than-expected 30-day readmission rates for patients with heart failure, heart attack and pneumonia.Lower hospital readmission rates for those conditions have been associated with the program but it was unclear if the program was associated with a change in patient deaths. This observational study included 8 million Medicare hospitalizations for heart failure, heart attack and pneumonia before and after HRRP was implemented. Study results suggest implementation of the HRRP was associated with an increase in deaths within 30 days after discharge for hospitalization for heart failure and pneumonia but not for heart attack. More research is needed to understand if the increase in 30-day postdischarge mortality is a result of the program, considering a lack of association with mortality within 45 days of hospital admission. Source:https://jamanetwork.com/last_img read more

Facebook bug unblocks unwanted connections for a bit Update

first_img © 2018 AFP Facebook on Monday said it is notifying more than 800,000 users that a software bug temporarily unblocked people at the social network and its Messenger service. Explore further Citation: Facebook bug unblocks unwanted connections for a bit (Update) (2018, July 2) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-07-facebook-800k-users-bug-unblock.html Facebook admits privacy settings ‘bug’ affecting 14 million userscenter_img The glitch active between May 29 and June 5 has been fixed, according to Facebook, which has been striving to regain trust in the aftermath of a Cambridge Analytica data privacy scandal.”We know that the ability to block someone is important,” Facebook chief privacy officer Erin Egan said in a blog post.”We’d like to apologize and explain what happened.”Blocking someone on Facebook prevents them from seeing posts in a blocker’s profile; connecting as a friend, or starting Messenger conversations.Blocking someone also automatically “unfriends” the person.”There are many reasons why people block another person on Facebook,” Egan said.”Their relationship may have changed or they may want to take a break from someone posting content they find annoying.”People are blocked for harsher reasons, such as harassment or bullying, Egan added.The software bug did not restore any severed friend connections at the social network, but someone who was blocked could have been able to reach out to a blocker on Messenger, according to Facebook.”While someone who was unblocked could not see content shared with friends, they could have seen things posted to a wider audience,” Egan said of the glitch.The vast majority of the more than 800,000 people affected by the bug had only one person they had blocked be temporarily unblocked, according to Facebook.People affected by the bug will get notifications encouraging them to check their blocked lists.Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg earlier this year was grilled by the European Parliament and the US Congress about a massive breach of users’ personal data in the Cambridge Analytica scandal.Facebook admitted that up to 87 million users may have had their data hijacked by British consultancy Cambridge Analytica, which worked for US President Donald Trump during his 2016 campaign. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Facebook—its corporate symbol shown here in a file image—says it is notifying more than 800,000 users that a software bug temporarily unblocked people at the social network and its Messenger servicelast_img read more

UK review urges new rules to deal with power of tech giants

first_img Japan plans tighter regulation of tech giants Britain needs tough new rules to help counter the dominance of big tech giants like Facebook, Google and Amazon, a review of competition in the digital market concludes. Citation: UK review urges new rules to deal with power of tech giants (2019, March 13) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-03-uk-urges-power-tech-giants.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.center_img Wednesday’s 150-page report adds to an intensifying worldwide debate over the need for stricter regulation of Silicon Valley technology giants amid concern about their influence on the broader economy and their control of data. In the U.S., Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren last week proposed breaking up the biggest U.S. tech companies, slamming them for having too much market and political power.The British report was released the same day that Swedish music-streaming service Spotify said it filed an antitrust complaint against Apple, accusing it of stifling competition through its control over the iPhone’s operating system and app store. Spotify’s beef with Apple centers on a 30 percent tax that it and other digital services have to pay to use Apple’s “in-app” payment system, making Spotify subscriptions more expensive than Apple Music.The British government’s review was led by Harvard University professor Jason Furman, who was a chief economic adviser to former U.S. President Barack Obama. The report found that global tech giants don’t face enough competition and said that existing rules are outdated and need to be beefed up.”The digital sector has created substantial benefits but these have come at the cost of increasing dominance of a few companies, which is limiting competition and consumer choice and innovation,” Furman said. “Some say this is inevitable or even desirable. I think the U.K. can do better.”Britain’s House of Lords recently called for a new digital regulatory authority to provide overall oversight.EU authorities also have faced down big tech companies. EU competition commissioner Margrethe Vestager has slapped whopping fines on Google and ordered Apple to pay back billions in back taxes. EU, German and Austrian authorities are looking separately into Amazon’s marketplace platform over complaints of unfair practices.Britain’s financial secretary, Philip Hammond, said the government would respond later this year to the report’s recommendations, any of which must be approved by Britain’s Parliament to take effect.Recommendations include setting up a new “digital markets unit” tasked with giving people more control over their data by using open standards. That would let people move or share their personal information if they switch to a new digital service.The report’s authors said by making it easier for people to switch, “data mobility” would result in new digital services while creating new business opportunities to manage the data. This photo combo of images shows the Amazon, Google and Facebook logos. A review into competition in the U.K.’s digital market says the country needs tough new rules to help counter the dominance of big tech giants like Facebook, Google and Amazon. The independent review published Wednesday, March 13, 2019 says global tech giants don’t face enough competition and that existing rules are outdated and need to be beefed up. (AP Photo, file) Explore furtherlast_img read more