2 MTC mechanics killed 6 injured as bus rams wall

first_imgChennai: Two mechanics of the Metropolitan Transport Corporation died on the spot and six of their colleagues were injured when an MTC bus rammed the wall of the room they were resting in here early on Sunday, police said.The incident occurred at around 12.45 AM at the bus depot in Vadapalani area when the six mechanical engineers of the Corporation were sleeping in the building, they said. Two of them, Bharati (32) and Sekar (48) died on the spot, while the others were admitted to the Government Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’Kilpauk Medical College Hospital. The bus driver, who escaped unhurt, has been arrested, police said. Transport department principal secretary J Radhakrishnan visited the area and took stock of the incident. He also visited the injured at the hospital. Later, speaking to reporters, he said it was too early to arrive at a conclusion on the reasons for the accident. “I was told the bus driver is an experienced man”, he said.last_img read more

Bodies of UP train mishap victims reach Durgapur

first_imgKolkata: Meena Supen (47) and her daughter Manisha Supen (19), who were travelling to Kota aboard the weekly Hazrat Nizamuddin-Thiruvananthapuram Central Superfast Express, died after they allegedly jumped off the moving train near Vrindavan in Uttar Pradesh to catch a thief who stole their handbag.Their bodies were brought to the Ranchi Colony area of Durgapur on Sunday, amidst tension among the local residents. A pal of gloom descended on the family members of the victims, who have accused the railways for the incident. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari PujaThey alleged that there were no RPF personnel, as a result of which the incident occurred. Meena was taking her daughter to Rajasthan’s Kota for admitting her to a medical coaching centre there. It was also alleged by a section of their neighbours that the mother was thrown out of the running train by the thief and the daughter jumped off after seeing her mother. The railway police in Uttar Pradesh have started a case in this regard and are probing the incident. Also Read – Bengal civic volunteer dies in road mishap on national highwayThe bodies reached Durgapur railway station at around 1 pm on Sunday. But the bodies were handed over to the family members after four hours, as the related documents did not reach the place. The family members of the victims alleged non-cooperation against the railway authorities. The local residents also demanded employment for a family member of the victims from the railways. The local MLA also reached the house of the victims and assured them of all possible help.last_img read more

Gender parity will sensitise one to women crimes Richa

first_imgMumbai: Actress Richa Chadha, who is gearing up for the release of her forthcoming film “Section 375”, says the idea is to sensitise one to women crimes and it will only happen with more gender parity within the workforce. “The gap is a reality for sure but so is the fact that there are such super woman advocates like Indira Jaising, Pinky Anand, Karuna Nandy, that we are just a step away from taking inspiration from the right people. “The government is doing their bit in setting up more Mahila courts which takes up crime cases about women and has women judges at the helm. Such initiative are surely a step in the right direction,” Richa said. Also Read – I have personal ambitions now: Priyanka “Section 375” is a courtroom drama where Richa plays the public prosecutor who is fighting the case of a rape victim Anjali Dangle, played by Meera Chopra. “The idea is to sensitise one to women crimes and it will only happen with more gender parity within the workforce as far as lawyers and judges are concerned. The survivor will be in a more comfortable spot and thus gender crimes can be approached from a more lived in space,” she added. Directed by Ajay Bahl, “Section 375” also features Akshaye Khanna. The film is scheduled to release on September 13.last_img read more

Pakistan trying to escalate violence along border ahead of UNGA Official

first_imgNew Delhi: Ahead of the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA), Pakistan is trying to escalate violence along the International Border and the Line of Control to draw attention of the world community on J&K, officials said on Thursday.Quoting intelligence inputs, a security official said terrorist infiltrations and firing from across the border are expected to increase in the coming days so that Islamabad can paint a picture of trouble in Jammu and Kashmir. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’Security forces were directed to be on extra alert along the border as well as in the hinterland so that any misadventure by the Pakistan Army and Pakistan-backed terrorists could be foiled, the official said. The UNGA begins on September 17 and will be attended by most of the world leaders which, according to intercepted intelligence inputs, Pakistan thinks gives it the right opportunity to highlight the issue of J&K. Even since the special status to Jammu and Kashmir under Article 370 was abrogated on August 5, Pakistan has been approaching world powers to speak in its favour and against the Indian government’s decision. “However, barring China, no country has supported Pakistan. Hence, Islamabad will try its best to raise the Kashmir issue through escalation of violation along the border as well as in the hinterland,” another official said. Also Read – Farooq demands unconditional release of all detainees in J&KThe Union Home Ministry has also issued a general advisory to all states and Union Territories asking them to strengthen security in sensitive places under their jurisdiction. PM Narendra Modi will attend the UNGA session. Pakistan PM Imran Khan will also attend the annual event. Khan has been repeatedly warning the possibility of a military confrontation between the two nuclear-armed neighbours over the Kashmir issue. On Wednesday, General Officer Commanding (GoC) of the Army’s 15 Corps Lt General K J S Dhillon and Additional Director General of J&K Police Munir Khan accused Pakistan of pushing infiltrators into Kashmir to carry out terrorist activities.last_img read more

Gurbani Sangeet Samagam celebrates Guru Nanak Devs 550th birth anniversary

first_imgNEW DELHI: The Punjabi Academy of the Delhi Government has organised a three-day Gurbani Sangeet Samagam 2019, to celebrate the 550th birth anniversary of Guru Nanak Dev.The annual cultural festival of Gurbani Sangeet is organised between September 6 and 8 at Talkatora Stadium of Delhi. This was the 15th year of the festival with performances of Punjabi spiritual songs and recitation of messages from the Guru Granth Sahib. The festival started with the performance of Aprampar Kirtan Group of Guru Nanak Dev Ji Khalsa College, Delhi and other singers by chanting the messages of the Holy Book Guru Granth Saheb. The unique musical tradition established by venerated Sikh Gurus of India which is nearly five-century old practice was presented in the festival by various artists. Also Read – After eight years, businessman arrested for kidnap & murderThe festival has always been a most awaited event of Delhi’s cultural life and people look forward to this festival of love, spirituality and brotherhood rendered traditionally through Raagas, as originally composed and enshrined in the Guru Granth Saheb by the Sikh Gurus. On the first day performance by Smita Rao Bellur of Mumbai and Principal Sukhwant Singh Jandiala Guru, Amritsar took place. On the second day, Ustad Lakhan Khan-Dane Khan of Rajasthan and Bhai Davinder Singh Bondal of Jalandhar performed at the event. On the last day of the festival, Delhi will witness performances from Bibi Rashmi Agarwal, Ghulam Abbas Khan and Bhai Baljeet Singh Namdhari. Also Read – Two brothers held for snatchings”Delhi has a very rich Punjabi culture, therefore, my goal is to present the message of inclusion and harmony of Guru Nanak Dev through cultural programs. I believe that culture is the best way to convey messages to the people of Delhi across religion. This festival will not only help to enrich the Sikh tradition of Delhi but also give a chance to the people to witness and explore the philosophy of Guru Nanak Dev and other Sikh Gurus,” said Delhi Deputy Chief Minister Manish Sisodia.last_img read more

Jeep captured from Pak in 1971 stands as war trophy in army

first_imgLeh: All of 48 years and maybe more, the ‘Jarpal Queen’, a symbol of India’s triumph against Pakistan, travels through the length and breadth of India as a ‘war trophy’ of the Indian Army.The ‘Queen’, named after Jarpal in Pakistan, is actually royalty on four wheels, a Willys jeep, sleek, shiny and in shipshape condition, the object of lavish attention at the 3 Grenadier Regiment’s camp, about 40 km from Leh. The vehicle, with Urdu script on its sides, is a “war trophy” captured from Pakistan during the 1971 conflict. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’Once fitted with a recoilless gun, this US-origin jeep now travels across India as a prized possession of the Regiment, which has ensured the almost 50-year-old vehicle moves like a well-oiled machine. “We captured it during the Jarpal war and it was used by the Pakistani army as a part of their attack plan at Shakargarh border, in Jarpal area of Pakistan. So, it was named Jarpal Queen. From that war, India has two Param Vir Chakra medals,” said Colonel (retd) J S Dhillon. Also Read – Farooq demands unconditional release of all detainees in J&KThe two Param Vir Chakra awardees were Colonel Hoshiar Singh from the Grenadier Regiment and Second Lieutenant Arun Khetrapal from the Armoured Regiment. “It is a ‘war trophy’ and was shown to VIP guests and was also used during guard of honour for senior officers. It is in great condition and runs very smoothly,” said Dhillon, a Sena Medal recipient who was commissioned in the 3 Grenadier Regiment in 1982 and now heads the Indian Institute of Skiing and Mountaineering, Gulmarg, under the Ministry of Tourism. He said the ‘Jarpal Queen’ had gone wherever the Regiment has been stationed. Jaipur, Kupwara, Simla, Poonch, Meerut, Ferozepur… the list is long. In 1988, when the Regiment was in Ferozpur in Punjab, the jeep was registered with the Punjab transport department for it to be driven on the road. “We took a number, insured and registered it. As far as I can recall, except the regiment’s UN mission to Eithopia, the jeep has gone everywhere with them,” said Dhillon. The jeep has also been witness to numerous border skirmishes with the neighbouring country, particularly during the regiment’s stints in Jammu and Kashmir. A full-scale war broke out between India and Pakistan over East Pakistan in 1971. It ended with surrender of 90,000 Pakistani troops and led to the creation of Bangladesh. PTIlast_img read more

Afghanistan peace talks with Taliban are dead Trump

first_imgWashington DC: President Donald Trump has said the Afghanistan peace talks with the Taliban are “dead”, saying the United States had hit the group harder in the last four days than anytime in 10 years. “They (talks with the Taliban) are dead. As far as I’m concerned, they’re dead,” Trump told reporters at the White House on Monday. The president had stunned the world on Saturday when he announced the cancellation of a secret meeting with the Taliban and Afghan President Ashraf Ghani at Camp David near Washington. It came after the Taliban claimed responsibility of an attack in Kabul last week, in which an American soldier were among the dead. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from US”They (the Taliban) thought that (they) had to kill people in order to put themselves in a little better negotiating position…. You can’t do that with me,” Trump said while responding to a question about his decision to cancel the talks. “So, they dead as far as I’m concerned,” he said. “We have hit the Taliban harder in the last four days than they have been hit in over 10 years. So that’s the way it is.” Trump said the decision to invite the Taliban to Camp David was his, and so was the call to cancel it. Justifying the move, the president underlined that he did not want the meeting to happen under circumstances “where they (Taliban) go around and try and make themselves a little bit more important by killing a soldier and also a total of 12 people”. The Taliban, Trump said, did a mistake.last_img read more

A look at some of the major issues in Nova Scotias election

first_imgHALIFAX – A look at some of the major issues in Nova Scotia’s election campaign:Balanced Books: The Liberals will portray themselves as good fiscal managers, having balanced the books in the last two years of their mandate and at a time when some governments in Atlantic Canada are running massive deficits. The Progressive Conservatives will counter that the government has done little to grow the economy by way of tax cuts for businesses. The NDP will maintain that more spending is needed in health care and community services.Labour Relations: The Liberals have gained a reputation as hard-liners when it comes to dealing with public sector unions. The election comes on the heels of a contentious dispute with 9,000 teachers that saw the government impose a contract after the union rejected three tentative deals. There is still no deal with the civil service or with several health-care units. Unions will also point to the unproclaimed Bill 148, which could be used to impose settlements and restrict arbitrated settlements.Education: Some blowback from the teachers’ contract dispute will also be felt as the Liberals move to address classroom working conditions and to address the highly charged issue of classroom inclusion. The Liberals will defend their record, saying they have fulfilled promises to restore an increased level of funding for the system to address such things as classroom caps and revamping the curriculum.Health: Both the Tories and the NDP will hammer hard on an unfulfilled Liberal promise from the 2013 election of a family doctor for every Nova Scotian. Government figures released in March indicated just over 25,000 people were on the wait list for access to a family doctor or a nurse practitioner, although figures released by Statistics Canada said 11.3 per cent of the population, or just over 100,000 people, did not have access to a health-care provider. The Liberals will counter that another kept promise to merge health authorities has resulted in a more efficient health system. Another contentious issue to be raised will be the government’s abrupt shelving of a plan that would have tripled pharmacare premiums for some seniors.Economy and Jobs: Both the Tories and the NDP will point to a net loss of jobs over the government’s mandate as proof the Liberals had no plan for the sputtering economy. The Liberals will point to gains in immigration and to programs aimed at retaining university- and college-educated workers in the professions and trades as proof of some progress in a province facing demographic challenges.Arts and Culture: The Liberals’ move to axe the province’s lucrative film tax credit early in its mandate could likely have a lingering effect in the campaign, particularly in some Halifax ridings.Yarmouth Ferry: Although all three parties support the Yarmouth to Portland, Maine, ferry, the level of taxpayer funding will be raised by the opposition. The Liberals will point to an upswing in the tourism sector as proof the ferry is a much needed economic engine in southwestern Nova Scotia.last_img read more

Mayor says Churchill cant wait until spring for rail service premier mulls

first_imgWINNIPEG – People in sub-arctic Churchill, Man., face the prospect of running out of heating fuel over the winter unless the region’s rail line is repaired and service is restored, Mayor Mike Spence said Wednesday.Spence met with federal and provincial politicians in Winnipeg and tried to persuade them to help the rail line’s owner speed up plans to repair damage from extensive flooding this spring.Denver-based Omnitrax has said it will be next spring before the many sections of washed-out track and damaged bridges can be assessed and fixed.“We need to deal with this right now. We can’t have a spring deadline,” Spence said.“Not having propane in the community — Manitoba housing units, private homes, private businesses, right? You run out of heat, you’re done.”The rail line is the only land link to the remote town of 900 on the western shore of Hudson Bay — a popular tourist destination for watching polar bears and beluga whales. Trains bring in food, fuel and other supplies, some of which are now being flown in at much higher cost.Fuel, heavy equipment and other goods can be brought in by ship, but the ice-free season is short and the winters are cold and long. The town does not have enough propane storage facilities to last an entire winter, Spence said.Omnitrax has said it has hired an engineering company that will take four weeks to assess the damage and list necessary repairs.The mayor wants the federal and provincial governments to put “boots on the ground” in the form of inspectors to help Omnitrax get a quicker assessment. He also wants government subsidies to cover the higher costs of shipping goods by air.Spence said he was encouraged after the meetings that included a chat with Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister.“What I took away from it was that there’s an opportunity here for collectively working together and seeing some positive results.”Pallister, who spoke to reporters before the meeting, said he is willing to consider subsidies and perhaps some help for repair work, but added he is not ready to make any specific commitments.“You don’t agree to a subsidy until you know what the subsidy is for,” Pallister said.“We haven’t assessed the damage on the rail line, for example. We don’t know the time frames. We don’t know the nature of the supplies that are needed.”A preliminary assessment has shown that flooding washed away the track bed in 19 places and damaged at least five bridges. Omnitrax has said another 30 bridges and 600 culverts need to be examined further.last_img read more

Neverbefore seen images beamed live from the bottom of the Gulf of

first_imgCHETICAMP, N.S. – A scientific expedition in the Gulf of St. Lawrence is revealing never-before seen images of odd and valuable marine life.Federal researchers have joined with the non-profit group Oceana Canada to use a $6-million robotic submersible, known as ROPOS, to explore the seabed, and live-stream sometimes spectacular high-definition video to the internet.“The Gulf of St. Lawrence has never been explored with the type of technology we have,” Oceana’s science director, Robert Rangeley, said in an interview Monday from Cheticamp, N.S., where the two-ship expedition was poised to begin another week of exploring the Gulf’s depths.“There’s hardly been any camera work at all.”Alexandra Cousteau, granddaughter of the famous French filmmaker and marine conservationist Jacques Cousteau, is part of the expedition and an adviser to Oceana, an international ocean conservation group based in Washington, D.C.“It’s such a thrill to be part of something that has never been done before,” Alexandra Cousteau said in a dockside interview.The recent deaths of at least 10 endangered North Atlantic right whales in the Gulf has focused international attention on the importance of the vast area.Cousteau said previous studies have typically relied on the use of underwater sleds that were dragged along the ocean floor and later hoisted to the surface for inspection by scientists.“What they got at the surface was broken,” she said. “They had no idea how the species were interacting. We’ve been able to see how that whole neighbourhood works.”In particular, Cousteau said the high-tech submersible — ROPOS stands for Remotely Operated Platform for Ocean Sciences — has recorded video images of large numbers of juvenile redfish seeking shelter amongst fields of sea pens, a type of bottom-dwelling coral that looks like old-fashioned pens made from fanciful feathers.Redfish, which are also known as ocean perch, are a commercially valuable species that have been on the decline for years. But the video suggests the species may be making a comeback, as some Gulf fishermen have already suggested.“If this is where the juveniles are finding shelter, then we need to protect that,” said Cousteau. “I think that’s something everybody can agree on.”Rangeley, a research scientist who used to work with World Wildlife Fund Canada and the Fisheries Department, said he and his colleagues have also spotted porbeagle sharks, right whales, cod, colourful sponges and large schools of sand lance, a herring-like fish that is a key source of food for whales and seabirds.“We saw massive schools of them for the longest time,” the marine biologist said. “We could hardly see through the lens of the ROPOS … It’s a pretty lively place, the Gulf of St. Lawrence.”At one point, the cameras captured the moment when a northern gannet, a large seabird known for its torpedo-like fishing skills, plunged into the water to feast on sand lance.“We’re also measuring stuff,” Rangeley said, adding that expedition scientists are taking samples for genetic and chemical analysis. “We’re not just taking pretty pictures. It’s a full-spectrum science effort.”The research is important because Canada has the world’s longest coastline. Spread across three oceans, it covers more than 243,00 kilometres. The federal government has committed to conserving 10 per cent of the country’s marine areas by 2020.The expedition started last week off the coast of Quebec’s Anticosti Island, and then moved to the American Bank, a submarine cliff lying off the eastern tip of Quebec’s Gaspe Peninsula. More exploration is expected this week off the west coast of Cape Breton.Oceana, established two years ago in Canada, was part of a similar expedition in the Gulf of Maine in June.The ROPOS submersible, which can dive to 5,000 metres, is being carried aboard the CCGS Martha L. Black, a Canadian Coast Guard light icebreaker. The submersible is owned by the Canadian Scientific Submersible Facility, based in North Saanich, B.C.— By Michael MacDonald in Halifaxlast_img read more

Man charged with seconddegree murder robbery in NS businessmans death

first_imgSYDNEY, N.S. – A 28-year-old man has been charged with second-degree murder and robbery with violence in the death of a prominent Nova Scotia businessman.Jim Matthews — co-founder of a financial planning business in Halifax — was found dead at in his apartment in Sydney last Tuesday.Cape Breton Regional Police Chief Peter McIsaac said Aaron Shaun Young of New Waterford has been charged in the 54-year-old man’s death.Young is also facing firearms and robbery-related charges for two separate incidents in New Waterford last Monday, said McIsaac.“These offences occurred subsequent to the homicide of Mr. Matthews,” said McIsaac, noting that Young was charged early last week in those armed robberies and was remanded into custody.“Our investigators were quickly able to identify Mr. Young as a suspect, and we knew that there was not an individual at large in our community after committing a homicide, and we were satisfied that there was no ongoing risk to public safety.”Matthews split his time between Halifax and Cape Breton, and was part-owner of the market building where his body was discovered.The coal miner’s son co-owned Matthews McDonough Financial Planning Inc., in Halifax.Originally from Sydney Mines, he had a passion for revitalizing Sydney’s downtown core. He owned several office buildings in the city, including the popular Prince Street Market.“He wanted to help revitalize downtown. He was passionate about it and the building is up and running and a success.” John Tompkins, his long-time business partner, said Aug. 31.“Jim was a guy that was up at 3:30 or four o’clock in the morning and was out for a run and an hour bike ride before you had your coffee. You could never match his energy and his zest for life.”Young appeared in Sydney provincial court on Friday and is scheduled to appear in court again Oct. 10.last_img read more

Lack of racial diversity in medical textbooks could mean inequity in care

first_imgVANCOUVER – Sitting in a doctor’s waiting room in Vancouver, Patricia Louie saw posters that only featured white and light skin-toned people depicted as patients. She wondered if medical textbooks would also reflect what she considered to be a biased portrayal of Canada’s diverse population.The experience in 2012 led the sociology student who was studying at the University of British Columbia at the time to analyze faces in four textbooks widely used in North American medical schools. She concluded in an honours thesis that racial diversity was being ignored.Most images in medical books are of legs, arms and chests, showing only skin tone, not race, so Louie broadened her research as a master’s student at the University of Toronto and focused on skin tone in over 4,000 images in later versions of the same textbooks.The study by Louie and co-author Rima Wilkes, a sociology professor at the University of British Columbia, found the proportion of dark skin tones represented was very small in images featured in “Atlas of Human Anatomy,” “Bates’ Guide to Physical Examinations and History Taking,” “Clinically Oriented Anatomy” and “Gray’s Anatomy for Students.”“Atlas” had fewer than one per cent of photos featuring dark skin, while the highest amount — five per cent — was included in “Gray’s,” the researchers say in the study, published in the journal Social Science and Medicine.Imagery of six common cancers for people of colour or dark skin tone hardly exist in the textbooks, says the study, which suggests unequal health care could result.“Although we can’t make any causal statements, I think it’s fair to say that the material in textbooks may influence how doctors think about who a patient is and that the under-representation of dark skin-toned people may contribute to inequities in treatment,” said Louis, who is of Caucasian and Asian heritage.She said mortality rates for some cancers, including breast, cervical, lung, colon and skin, are higher on average for black people, who are often diagnosed at later stages of the disease.The study draws on research that says 52 per cent of black people receive an initial diagnosis of an advanced stage of skin cancer compared with 16 per cent of white people.“The research shows that even though blacks are less likely to get skin cancer than whites, they’re more likely to die when diagnosed,” Louis said.Skin cancer would require doctors to look for melanomas on nails, hands and feet, but none of the textbooks included images of what that would look like in dark-skinned patients, raising questions about whether physicians are adequately trained to treat people of diverse races, she said.“I would like publishers of medical textbooks to include more images of darker-skinned people and also to pay attention to the way diseases are presented on darker skin tones because that is very necessary for equality of care for racial minorities and darker-skinned people in Canada and the U.S.,” said Louie, who is now doing a PhD in racial inequality in health care.The study cites data from two American studies that suggest race-based inequities pervade the health-care system in the United States, and black dialysis patients are less likely than their white counterparts to be referred to transplant waiting lists.Dr. Roger Wong, executive associate dean at the University of B.C.’s faculty of medicine, said valuing diversity should mean promoting it in textbooks.“So updating future editions is the way to go,” he said of the four books related to the study. “I do think it has flagged for these editors and for writers that all of us need to be very mindful, and I do agree there’s work to be done.”Beyond textbook learning, Wong said case studies presented at the university’s medical school are rigorously vetted to ensure they reflect Canada’s ethnic diversity and real patients who volunteer to interact with students are selected based on similar guidelines.“With Indigenous patients, traditional medicine is very important,” he said, citing an example of diversity. “We need to respect and understand where that’s coming from and also understand some of the nuances of when we talk about ‘western medicine.’”— Follow @CamilleBains1 on Twitter.last_img read more

NS looking for more foster parents especially African Nova Scotians

first_imgHALIFAX – Nova Scotia needs more foster parents — with a particular emphasis on African Nova Scotians — even after the recruitment of 80 new foster parents, officials told a legislature committee on Tuesday.There are currently 684 children in foster care, with 663 total homes, but the numbers fluctuate, said Nancy MacLellan, associate deputy minister of the Department of Community Services.“Our social workers could get a call tomorrow and we could have a family of four that needs care, so in an ideal world we’d have approved foster families that are waiting for children,” said MacLellan.She told the committee that an additional $1.6 million in supports announced last July have helped, and resulted in about $900 more per foster family per child. The changes included increasing the per diem rate per child, and raising the babysitting rate and the amount families receive for recreation.“Which are pretty material increases, and still … we want to do more,” MacLellan said.She said work is also being done to reduce approval-process red tape, and on recruitment efforts in African Nova Scotian communities as part of boosting the numbers of available foster parents.“These measures contributed to an increase of more than 80 foster parents in the last year and we still are always looking for more foster parents,” MacLellan said.Leonard Doiron, the province’s executive director of Child, Youth and Family Supports, told the committee there is an increased emphasis for social workers to delve into foster children’s backgrounds in order to address cultural needs.He said greater efforts are being made to gather information which is often noted in the files of social workers, although there is no formal tracking process in place.They have also increased outreach efforts, he said.“Our teams are working very hard to work with community groups to give them voice and choice and to inform us about what their needs are.”Later, Doiron said the numbers provided to the committee included about two-thirds of children under the province’s care, noting that foster care isn’t appropriate for all children.He said although recruitment numbers are on an upward trend, the needs remain for foster parents who can provide more specialized levels of care and for homes better suited to a child’s cultural background.The biggest challenge, Doiron said, is the need to adapt the foster program to meet the needs of diverse modern families, where most often both parents work outside the home.“The needs of the children are different, the prospective foster parents, their needs are different, he said. “All of these things have to be re-thought and transformed.”NDP committee member Susan Leblanc believes the government funding hike for foster families has helped, but she said a bigger help would be more resources at the “front end” for families who are in crisis.“So that perhaps we don’t need as many foster families because children can stay in their homes and families can stay together with the proper supports,” said Leblanc.Progressive Conservative Barbara Adams also applauded the changes, but called for more training resources for potential foster parents.“The more we can do to help the foster parents succeed and have an enjoyable experience the better,” Adams said.The total cost of foster care in 2017-18 was $15.7 million, including for per diem payments, competency payments and the maintenance of children in care.last_img read more

Donald Trump in his own words after meeting with the G7 in

first_imgLA MALBAIE, Que. – Donald Trump held a free-flowing news conference as he departed the G7 summit on Saturday. It was his first visit to Canada as president of the United States, and he stayed about 24 hours. Here are some highlights from his comments:On Canada and the summit: “It has worked out to be so wonderful. The people of Canada are wonderful, and it’s a great country, and a very beautiful country.”On the state of global trade: “From the standpoint of trade and jobs and being fair to companies, we are really, I think, committed. I think they are starting to be committed to a much more fair trade situation for the United States, because it has been treated very, very unfairly….And I don’t blame other leaders for that. I blame our past leaders. There was no reason that this should have happened.”On the North Korea summit: “I’ll be on a mission of peace, and we will carry in, really — in my heart, we’re going to be carrying the hearts of millions of people, people from all over the world. We have to get denuclearization. We have to get something going. We really think that North Korea will be a tremendous place in a very short period of time. And we appreciate everything that’s going on. We appreciate the working together with North Korea. They’re really working very well with us.”On bringing Russia back into the G7: “I think it would be an asset to have Russia back in. I think it would be good for the world. I think it would be good for Russia. I think it would be good for the United States. I think it would be good for all of the countries of the current G7.”On the ultimate goal for global trade rules: “You want a tariff-free, you want no barriers, and you want no subsidies, because you have some cases where countries are subsidizing industries, and that’s not fair. So you go tariff-free, you go barrier-free, you go subsidy-free. ….“It’s got to change. It’s going to change. I mean, it’s not a question of ‘I hope it changes.’ It’s going to change, a hundred per cent. And tariffs are going to come way down, because people cannot continue to do that. We’re like the piggy bank that everybody is robbing. And that ends.”On renegotiating NAFTA: “So two things can happen on NAFTA. We’ll either leave it the way it is, as a threesome deal with Canada and with the United States and Mexico, and change it very substantially — we’re talking about very big changes. Or we’re going to make a deal directly with Canada and directly with Mexico. Both of those things could happen.”On rating G7 friendships: “I would say that the level of relationship is a 10. We have a great relationship. Angela and Emmanuel and Justin. I would say the relationship is a 10.”last_img read more

Hedley frontman facing three sex offence charges in Toronto

first_imgToronto police have charged the frontman of the band Hedley with three sexual offences involving two women.Police say 34-year-old Jacob Hoggard is scheduled to appear in a Toronto courtroom on Thursday.He is charged with one count of sexual interference and two counts of sexual assault causing bodily harm.Police allege the offences happened on three dates in 2016 after a man met with two women on separate occasions.Hoggard’s lawyer could not immediately be reached for comment.last_img

Diabetes Canada disappointed federal budget didnt include funds for national strategy

first_imgVANCOUVER (NEWS 1130) – The government has missed a critical opportunity. That’s the message is coming from Diabetes Canada, in response to the federal government’s budget, which does not include funding for a new national strategy.Diabetes Canada president and CEO Dr. Jan Hux says there’s a huge sense of urgency. “The number of Canadians diagnosed with diabetes has doubled in the last 12 years. Another person is diagnosed every three minutes.”“We estimate the current costs — direct, attributable costs — of diabetes are in the order of $28 billion. A 20-year-old in Canada now faces a 50/50 lifetime risk of developing diabetes,” she said.Hux says the organization was asking for $150 million over seven years to implement its strategy, which she argues would lead to 90 per cent of Canadians living in environments that prevent the development of diabetes.“Ninety per cent of Canadians [would] be aware of their diabetes status and — for those affected — 90 per cent of them would receive treatment. And of those receiving treatment, 90 per cent would be showing measurable improvements in their health outcome.”She admits there are some items in the federal budget that are of benefit to people with diabetes. “Most noteably, changes to the application of the registered disability fund, so people could actually retain access to those funds after turning 21. That is encouraging for people living with Type 1 Diabetes, in particular, who face very high out-of-pocket costs.”last_img read more

Cities around the world flip the switch to mark Earth Hour

first_imgTORONTO (680 NEWS) — Landmarks around the world from the CN Tower to the Eiffel Tower are going dark for an hour at 8:30 local time tonight for Earth Hour.This will mark the 13th year Canada is switching off the lights in response to the global movement.While it can be a good tool to raise awareness, scientists say an hour isn’t going to repair climate change.“There needs to be government action. There needs to also be individual lifestyle changes as well,” says Dr. Dave Atkinson, an arctic ecologist at Ryerson University.“We can’t continue to do the things the way we’ve been doing them and burning the amount of carbon that we have. Carbon dioxide levels continue to rise and it’s just creating a warmer planet.”#EarthHour : ce soir @LaTourEiffel et plus de 200 autres monuments de @Paris s’éteignent pour rappeler l’engagement de notre ville contre le dérèglement climatique. @WWFFrance pic.twitter.com/8HWAqNtsbH— Anne Hidalgo (@Anne_Hidalgo) March 30, 2019Beginning in Sydney in 2007, Earth Hour has spread to more than 180 countries, with tens of millions of people joining in.This year’s Earth Hour is specifically focused on conserving nature and biodiversity.Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo dimmed the lights Saturday on the city’s most famous monument for an hour starting at 8:30 p.m.Here’s how some countries have celebrated Earth Hour so far:Open Gallery4 items– With files from the Associated Presslast_img read more

Montreal Mayor Valerie Plante faces online threats over secularism stance

first_imgMONTREAL — Quebec’s premier is speaking out against online threats levelled against Montreal’s mayor over her stance on Bill 21.Montreal Mayor Valerie Plante has said she’s been the target of increasing threats since making known her opposition to the provincial secularism bill.Plante told reporters threats of physical violence on social media have spiked recently, and she’s taking them very seriously.A senior aide to the mayor told The Canadian Press that messages deemed to have crossed a line have been flagged and given to Montreal police.In Quebec City, Premier Francois Legault called the threats unacceptable and said the debate over Bill 21 must be respectful.Bill 21 would prohibit public servants in positions of authority — including teachers, police officers, Crown prosecutors and prison guards — from wearing religious symbols on the job. A grandfather clause would protect people already hired in those positions.The debate surrounding the proposed legislation has been divisive since the bill was tabled last month.“This is unacceptable. We have to repeat again that this debate has to be done respectfully, and we have to be careful about any kind of violence,” Legault said in Quebec City on Thursday.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Warriors even up NBA Finals with win over Raptors

first_imgAndre Iguodala’s 3-pointer with 5.9 seconds left was the clincher as the Golden State Warriors held off the Toronto Raptors 109-104 on Sunday, evening the best-of-seven NBA Finals at 1-1.Stephen Curry scored 23 points for the Warriors while Klay Thompson scored 25 points before leaving with an injury as the Warriors scored the first 18 points of the second half to take the lead for good.Kawhi Leonard had 34 points and 14 rebounds to lead the Raptors, his 12th 30-point game of these playoffs, while Fred VanVleet had 17 and Kyle Lowry contributed 13 points.RELATED: Raptors fans confident ahead of Game 2The Raptors led by as many as 12 points in the first half, but were done in by an awful third quarter that saw the Warriors race out to an 18-0 run while fans were still filing back to their seats. The Raptors turned the ball over five times and missed their first nine shots in the ugly stretch.The loss snaps the Raptors five-game winning streak.A split isn’t bad news for the Raptors, with 12 of the 17 teams who won the first game going on to win the Larry O’Brien Trophy when the series is tied 1-1.Among the stars in the building for Sunday’s game was 44 – Barack Obama, the 44th President of the United States and noted basketball fan.Obama was accompanied by Raptors president Masai Ujiri as he walked past the Toronto dressing room prior to the game. He was seated next to NBA commissioner Adam Silver near the floor of the lower bowl. Obama and Drake exchanged a hug and a handshake before taking their separate seats.Drake was in his normal courtside perch.Other celebs said to be in attendance at Scotiabank Arena were actors David Boreanaz and David Castaneda, singer-musicians Alessia Cara, Fantasia, J. Cole, Shawn Mendes, The Weeknd and manager Amir (Cash) Esmailian, Steve Aoki and Flo Rida, golfers Rory McIlroy, Sergio Garcia, Graeme McDowell, Justin Thomas and Danny Willett, Maple Leafs centre Nazem Kadri, GM Kyle Dubas and president Brendan Shanahan and Toronto Argonauts James Wilder Jr., and S.J. Green.Canadian musicians Win Butler, Dallas Green, Paul Langlois and two members of the Arkells were also in the house.Fantasia, wearing an eye-popping red sequined jumpsuit, sang the U.S. national anthem while Cara, clad in a Raptors jersey, looked after “O Canada.”last_img read more

As the House rises which bills made it through — and which

first_imgOTTAWA — The House of Commons has risen for the summer, following a flurry of legislating that rushed numerous significant bills into law before the break. But other potential laws remained mired in the legislative process as of late Thursday, awaiting action in the Senate — or a possible special summer session centred on ratification of the new North American free trade deal.Some of the high-profile bills that reached final votes after the beginning of last week and now just await royal assent:Bill C-48, the Oil Tanker Moratorium Act, a much-debated bill that would ban oil tankers from a portion of the British Columbia coast. Its journey through parliament has been marked by a committee report that recommended it not pass, the defeat of that report and the House’s rejection of some Senate amendments. Following the adjournment of the House and much debate, the Senate chose not to pursue further changes and passed it Thursday evening.Bill C-93, which will allow expedited pardons for Canadians who were convicted of simple possession of cannabis before legalization came into effect. The bill passed in the Senate Wednesday, without amendment.Bill C-59, a bill to establish a national-security review agency, create an “intelligence commissioner” to oversee the conduct of Canada’s spy agencies, and clarify the mandate and powers of the Communications Security Establishment (the government cybersecurity agency). The bill was amended by the Senate but several of those changes were rejected by the House, and the Senate voted Tuesday not to insist on its recommendations.Bills C-91, a bill that will create a commissioner for Indigenous languages and take other steps to save and revitalize those languages. The Senate voted Thursday, after the House had adjourned, to decline to insist on its amendments, finalizing the bill. Bill C-92, clarifying the jurisdiction of Indigenous people over family and child services in their communities, also passed through the Senate Thursday.Bill C-75, which will “hybridize” a series of offences so that they can now be prosecuted as either indictable or less-serious summary charges, and establish peremptory challenges of jurors. The bill was passed through the Senate with amendments, the House chose not to accept several of those, and the Senate Thursday decided not to insist on the remaining changes.Bill C-84, a long-awaited bill that expands the definition of bestiality to any sexual contact with an animal. Those convicted of bestiality will now be registered as sex offenders and banned from owning animals. It also widens the definition of animal fighting so that it applies to the construction of any arena for that purpose. It passed without amendment Tuesday.At the time the House adjourned for the summer Thursday, several bills still required further consideration in the upper chamber, which continued sitting. Among them were several controversial and consequential bills:Bill C-69, also fiercely criticized by the Conservatives, is the second of the government’s two major environmental bills, and would create a new environmental-impact assessment process for major projects in Canada. The House rejected a majority of the Senate’s amendments. It was due for a vote late Thursday.Bills C-98, which gives a review commission powers to review the Canada Border Services Agency,  was accelerated through the House Wednesday, when it was read a third time and passed in one swift motion.Bill C-83, which aims to eliminate the use of solitary confinement in Canadian prisons. The House rejected several key amendments proposed by the Senate, which some have said are needed to make the bill constitutional.Bill C-262, a law that would ensure federal laws are brought in line with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. But the government’s representative in the Senate, Peter Harder, announced Wednesday he did not see a path forward for the bill in the Senate and that the Trudeau government would campaign on fulfilling the intent of the bill.Bill C-97, a sprawling budget-implementation bill which includes changes to Canada’s refugee system, support for news journalism, and introduces the Canada Training Credit.And then there’s the one bill that could affect all the others:Bill C-100, the government’s bill to ratify the new NAFTA agreement among Canada, the United States and Mexico. It has only been introduced and read for the first time in the House of Commons, but might move quickly through Parliament before the election should the United States complete its own ratification of the deal in Congress. If Parliament returns for that bill, the Commons and the Senate could also take up others at the same time.Christian Paas-Lang, The Canadian Presslast_img read more